Seeing Nutrition Through the Consumer's Eyes
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Seeing Nutrition Through the Consumer's Eyes

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Visit www.restaurant.org/events/nutrition for details.

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  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
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  • The meeting in Chicago did not provide time enough to discuss the ongoing controversy among medical experts over the scientific questions. The science was reviewed by Dr. Larry Appel, a member of the anti-salt activist group WASH #273 at http://www.worldactiononsalt.com/home/docs/wash_members.xls

    For balance, I've downloaded a recent PPT by Dr. Hillel Cohen, author of several health outcomes studies of the NHANES database. You can find it at

    http://www.slideshare.net/rhanneman/salt-and-cardiovascul...



    Dick Hanneman, Salt Institute
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  • Your presentation was a helpful reminder that the food industry exists to meet the needs of its customers, food purchasers and that positive, holistic messaging is likely the most effective means. Right on. You noted that 15% of consumers in your 2007 survey report trying to avoid salt/sodium. This is 31 years after the McGovern Commission advocated salt reduction and 28 years after the Dietary Guidelines began its relentless PR effort. Thus, the conclusion of many at the meeting that consumer choice is not delivering the hoped-for salt reduction and, for some, the view that a stealth campaign to remove salt from products without notice to consumers is a strategy more likely to produce results. Beyond the ethics of reducing consumer choices in a “stealthy” manner and beyond the fact that consumers regularly value taste and price more highly than “healthfulness,” IFIC’s consumer perception surveys don’t address two key, related points: 1) Taste is clearly related to purchase choices, but is there any evidence that taste is related to total dietary sodium intake? And 2) if consumers succeed in replacing “regular” sodium foods with low-sodium alternatives (e.g low-sodium spaghetti sauce replacing the original higher-sodium recipe) will the end result be lower overall dietary sodium intakes? While the logical, intuitive and knee-jerk response is “of course, why wouldn’t it,” the science raises real questions as to whether salt is the food limiter and other dietary components will change as the body attempts to keep its “regular” sodium intake. For further info, see our website, http://www.saltinstitute.org/28.html.



    Dick Hanneman

    Salt Institute
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Seeing Nutrition Through the Consumer's Eyes Seeing Nutrition Through the Consumer's Eyes Presentation Transcript

  • Seeing Nutrition through the Consumer’s Eyes Shelley Goldberg, MPH, RD Senior Director International Food Information Council (IFIC) Foundation Nutrient Essentials: Sodium and the Healthy Plate July 10, 2008
  • International Food Information Council (IFIC) Foundation Mission: To effectively communicate science-based information on health, nutrition, and food safety for the public good. Primarily supported by the broad-based food, beverage and agricultural industries. http://www.ific.org
  • Research To Be Covered
    • IFIC Foundation
    • Food & Health Survey (2006-2008)
    • Food Biotechnology: A Study of U.S. Consumer Attitudinal Trends (2003-2007)
    • Addressing the Obesity Debate: A Consumer Point of View (2004)
    http://ific.org/research
  • IFIC Foundation Food & Health Survey 2006 2007 http://ific.org 2008
  • Methodology *Weighting is a widely accepted statistical technique that is used to ensure that the distribution of the sample reflects that of the population on key demographics. With any data collection method, even when the outgoing sample is balanced to the Census, some populations are more likely than others to respond. ↑ Significant increase from year indicated ↓ Significant decrease from year indicated IFIC Foundation Food & Health Survey 2008 Methodology Web Survey Population Representative Sample of Americans Aged 18+ Data Collection Period February 21-March 11, 2008 Sample Size (Error) n=1,000 ( + 3.1 For 2008) ( + 4.4 Among 2008, 2007, 2006) Data Weighting* Data Weighted on Age, Income, Education and Race
  • Attitudes Toward Health
  • The majority of Americans view their health status positively. (n=1000) Which of the following best describes your overall health status? IFIC Foundation Food & Health Survey 2008 ↑ Significant increase from year indicated ↓ Significant decrease from year indicated Total does not add to 100 percent due to rounding 81% Poor Fair Good Very Good Excellent
  • A little over half of Americans are satisfied with their health status. IFIC Foundation Food & Health Survey 2008 (n=1000) How satisfied are you with your overall health status? ↑ Significant increase from year indicated ↓ Significant decrease from year indicated Total does not add to 100 percent due to rounding 60% Not At All Satisfied Not Very Satisfied Neither Satisfied Nor Unsatisfied Somewhat Satisfied Extremely Satisfied
  • Health: Where consumers are and where they want to be. Unhealthy Healthy International Food Information Council, 2004 Where they ARE Where they WANT to be
  • What’s healthy, what’s not. Healthy
      • Active
      • Energetic
      • Confident
      • Smiling
      • Good complexion
      • Good posture
      • Bright and wide-eyed
      • Works out/is fit
      • Positive attitude
      • Well-rested
    Unhealthy
      • Overweight
      • Unkempt
      • Smokes/drinks/does drugs
      • Walks slowly
      • Dejected, holds head down
      • Bundle of nerves
      • Lays on couch
      • Out of breath
      • Dull skin
      • Depressed/negative
    vs. International Food Information Council, 2004
  • Consumers and Dietary Changes
  • The majority of Americans have made changes to improve the healthfulness of their diet in the past six months. IFIC Foundation Food & Health Survey 2008 (n=1000) Over the past six months, have you made any changes in an effort to improve the healthfulness of your diet? ↑ Significant increase from year indicated ↓ Significant decrease from year indicated Yes No
  • Losing weight (and improving health) is a top driver of dietary change. IFIC Foundation Food & Health Survey 2008 For which of the following reasons, if any, are you trying to improve the healthfulness of your diet? * Modification from 2006: “To improve my overall health” (69%) was changed to two items, including “To improve my overall well-being” and “To improve my physical health”. ↑ Significant increase from year indicated ↓ Significant decrease from year indicated ↓’ 07/’06 ↑’ 06 69% 69% 64% 34% 11%
  • Consumers say they increase and decrease consumption to improve their diet’s healthfulness. Which of the following changes, if any, have you made in the past six months to improve the healthfulness of your diet? ↑ ’ 06 ↑ ’ 06 ↑ ’ 07 IFIC Foundation Food & Health Survey 2008 ↑ Significant increase from year indicated ↓ Significant decrease from year indicated 2008 (n=669)
  • Thinking about your diet over the past few months, are there any foods or ingredients that you have avoided or eaten less of? Many consumers report avoiding certain foods/ingredients. The number of Americans that say they are avoiding certain foods or ingredients has been stable for the past three years. International Food Information Council, 2007 Yes No 2004 2005 2006 2007 2003
  • [IF AVOIDED FOODS] What foods or ingredients have you avoided? [OPEN END] Types of foods and ingredients consumers report avoiding. International Food Information Council, 2007 = Statistically significant 50% 33% 28% 12% 16% 2% 1% 0% 11% 54% 38% 21% 15% 14% 4% 2% 2% 11% 0% 0% Sugar/carbs Fats/oils/cholesterol Animal products Salt/sodium Snack foods/fast foods/soda Artificial/additives Spices Processed/refined foods Biotech Other 2006 2007
  • Nutrition Information and Messaging
  • Information Interesting but Confusing and Conflicting IFIC Foundation Food & Health Survey 2008 To what extent do you agree or disagree with the following statements regarding food and health information? Reading or hearing about the relationship between food and health is of interest to me I feel that food and health information is confusing and conflicting 2008 (n=1000) Total does not add to 100 percent due to rounding
  • Consumers tell us how to make messages more effective.
    • Consumer mandates:
      • Be positive
      • Keep it short and simple
      • Create it just for me
      • Make it specific and manageable
      • Provide the payoff
      • Talk food
      • Make it fun!
  • Taste is the #1 factor influencing Americans’ food and beverage purchasing decisions. IFIC Foundation Food & Health Survey 2008 How much of an impact do the following have on your decision to buy foods and beverages? 84% 88% 85% 70% 72% 64% 62% 65% 58% 55% 55% 48% Taste Price Healthfulness Convenience ↑ ’ 06 ↓ ’ 07 (n=1000) ↑ Significant increase from year indicated ↓ Significant decrease from year indicated ↑ ’ 06 ↑ ’ 06 ↑ ’ 06 Great impact Some impact * One percent difference due to more rigorous rounding criteria * *
  • In Summary... IFIC Foundation Food & Health Survey 2008
    • Consumers have a desire to be healthier
    • Health is holistic and means something different to everyone
    • Efforts to improve health must:
      • Consider lifestyle factors
      • Be positive
      • Involve tasty food