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Best Practices in Foodservice Menu Planning
 

Best Practices in Foodservice Menu Planning

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  • Addresses those who SAY they want healthier foods, but choose otherwise NOT sneaking in F&V. Transparency Positioning, Desire for food that is Exciting, Flavorful, Convenient, Speedy, Our Goal: All of our guests score 100 on Healthy Eating Index!

Best Practices in Foodservice Menu Planning Best Practices in Foodservice Menu Planning Presentation Transcript

  • BEST PRACTICES IN FOODSERVICE MENU PLANNING Deanne Brandstetter, M.B.A., R.D., C.D.N. Vice President of Nutrition & Wellness Compass Group, North America
    • World’s leading foodservice company
    • $19.5 billion revenues
    • Over 400,000 employees around the world
    • Ranked the 12th largest employer by Fortune magazine in 2006.
    • Emphasis on Sustainability and Health & Wellness
    Compass Group PLC
  • Targeting High Volume Ingredients and Convenience Products
    • 2007 reduced sodium soy sauce, no added salt canned diced tomatoes
    • 2007 10-15% reduction in ABP branded soups
    • 2008 meats, poultry & seafood products, bases
    • 2009 database of sodium in all contracted purchases
  • Education & Training
    • Speed Scratch
    • Taste First
    • Emphasis on Portion Control
  • Foodservice Challenges
    • How do we measure success?
    • Trends in operational model promotes use of convenience products
      • Loss of space for prep/ scratch cooking
      • Pressure from clients to reduce labor
    • Variability in customer salt acuity
    • Gradual changes, small step model