• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Lung cancer
 

Lung cancer

on

  • 536 views

INCIDENCE ...

INCIDENCE
CAUSES
TYPES
PATHOPHYSIOLOGY
STAGES
SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS
COMPLICATIONS
DIAGNOSTIC TESTS
TREATMENT
NURSING DIAGNOSES AND PATIENT OUTCOMES
NURSING INTERVENTIONS

Statistics

Views

Total Views
536
Views on SlideShare
536
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
1
Downloads
41
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Lung cancer Lung cancer Presentation Transcript

    • TABLE OF CONTENTS            INCIDENCE CAUSES TYPES PATHOPHYSIOLOGY STAGES SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS COMPLICATIONS DIAGNOSTIC TESTS TREATMENT NURSING DIAGNOSES AND PATIENT OUTCOMES NURSING INTERVENTIONS
    • LUNG CANCER The most common forms of lung cancer are squamous cell carcinoma, small cell carcinoma, Adenocarcinoma and large cell carcinoma.
    • INCIDENCE 28% of cancer deaths are from lung cancer.
    • CAUSES  Exact cause is unknown  Risk factors include       Tobacco smoking Exposure to industrial air pollutants ( eg.asbestos, arsenic) Diesel exhaust Radiation Genetic predisposition A diet poor in vitamins A, C & E
    • TYPES LUNG CANCER SMALL CELL LUNG CANCER(SCLS) LARGE CELL CARCINOMA NON-SMALL CELL LUNG CANCER (NSCLC) ADENOCARCIN OMA SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA
    • PATHOPHYSIOLOGY  Lung cancers originate in the respiratory tract epithelium, most originate in the lining of the bronchi.  Small cell carcinoma sometimes called oat cell carcinoma. It grows rapidly and has metastasized by the time of diagnosis. It is usually caused by smoking and often found centrally, near the bronchi. The patient with small cell carcinoma has a poor prognosis.
    •  Large cell carcinoma is rapidly growing cancer that can occur anywhere in the lungs. It metastasizes early in the disease, so the patients have poor prognosis.  Adenocarcinoma occurs more in women, and most often in the peripheral lung fields. It is slow growing but often is not diagnosed until metastasis has occurred.  Squamous cell carcinoma usually originates near the bronchi and metastasizes late in the disease. They are associated with history of smoking.
    • STAGES OF LUNG CANCER (TNM STAGING) CANCER TYPE STAGE CHARACTERISTICS Non- small cell lung cancer I No metastasis to lymph nodes Atelectasis or Pneumonia may be present Cancer has spread to local lymph nodes II III IV Small cell lung cancer Limited Extensive Cancer has invaded chest wall and usually has spread to lymph nodes Tumor has metastasized to distant organs and lymph nodes Cancer is limited to one side of the chest Cancer cells are found outside one side of the chest or in pleural fluid
    • SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS  Cough with sputum production  Repeated respiratory infections  Thick, purulent sputum  Hemoptysis  Dyspnea if the airway becomes obstructed by the tumor  Wheezing or stridor  Late signs include chest pain, weight loss, anemia and anorexia
    • COMPLICATIONS  Pleural effusion  Superior vena cava syndrome  Ectopic hormone production  Atelectasis and Pneumonia  Metastasis  Hypertrophic osteoarthropathy
    • DIAGNOSTIC TESTS  A complete medical history and physical examination  Chest X-ray examination  CT Scan and Lung scan  Sputum analysis for abnormal cells  Brain and bone scans are done to find out metastatic lesions  Biopsy of the lesion
    • TREATMENT SURGERY RADIATION CHEMOTHERAPY IMMUNOTHERAPY LASER THERAPY • Partial lung removal • Wedge resection • Segmental resection • Lobectomy • Radical lobectomy • Total removal • Pneumonectomy • Radical pneumonectomy
    • NURSING DIAGNOSES AND PATIENT OUTCOMES Anticipatory grieving related to poor prognosis Expected outcome: The patient will express his feelings about his diagnosis and the potential for death. Fatigue related to hypoxia Expected outcome: The patient will employ measures to prevent and modify fatigue. Impaired gas exchange related to pulmonary dysfunction Expected outcome: The patient will maintain his respiratory rate within 5 breaths/minute of his baseline.
    • NURSING INTERVENTIONS  Give supportive care and provide patient teaching to      minimize complications and speed patient’s recovery. Urge the patient to voice his concerns and provide proper explanations before doing any procedures. Prepare the patient for surgery. Encourage the patient to eat high calorie . Provide antiemetics and antidiarrheals as needed with chemotherapy. Provide skincare to minimize skin breakdown.