Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Chapter4
Chapter4
Chapter4
Chapter4
Chapter4
Chapter4
Chapter4
Chapter4
Chapter4
Chapter4
Chapter4
Chapter4
Chapter4
Chapter4
Chapter4
Chapter4
Chapter4
Chapter4
Chapter4
Chapter4
Chapter4
Chapter4
Chapter4
Chapter4
Chapter4
Chapter4
Chapter4
Chapter4
Chapter4
Chapter4
Chapter4
Chapter4
Chapter4
Chapter4
Chapter4
Chapter4
Chapter4
Chapter4
Chapter4
Chapter4
Chapter4
Chapter4
Chapter4
Chapter4
Chapter4
Chapter4
Chapter4
Chapter4
Chapter4
Chapter4
Chapter4
Chapter4
Chapter4
Chapter4
Chapter4
Chapter4
Chapter4
Chapter4
Chapter4
Chapter4
Chapter4
Chapter4
Chapter4
Chapter4
Chapter4
Chapter4
Chapter4
Chapter4
Chapter4
Chapter4
Chapter4
Chapter4
Chapter4
Chapter4
Chapter4
Chapter4
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Chapter4

496

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
496
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
14
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1.   CHAPTER4    Linear Wire Antennas 4.1 INTRODUCTION  .............................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 2  .4.2 INFINITESIMAL DIPOLE ................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 2  4.2.1 Radiated Fields ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 3  4.2.2 Power Density and Radiation Resistance ............................................................................................................................................................................ 7  4.2.3 Near‐Field ( ) Region .............................................................................................................................................................................................. 13  4.2.5 Intermediate‐Field (kr > 1) Region ..................................................................................................................................................................................... 15  4.2.6 Far‐Field (kr >> 1) Region ................................................................................................................................................................................................... 17  4.2.7 Directivity ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 19 4.3    SMALL DIPOLE ....................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 21 4.4    REGION SEPARATION .............................................................................................................................................................................................................. 25  4.4.1 Far‐Field (Fraunhofer) Region ............................................................................................................................................................................................ 27  4.4.2 Radiating Near‐Field (Fresnel) Region ............................................................................................................................................................................... 30  4.4.3 Reactive Near‐Field Region ................................................................................................................................................................................................ 32 4.5 FINITE LENGTH DIPOLE ................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 33  4.5.1 Current Distribution ........................................................................................................................................................................................................... 33  4.5.2 Radiated Fields: Element Factor, Space Factor, and Pattern Multiplication ..................................................................................................................... 35  4.5.3 Power Density, Radiation Intensity, and Radiation Resistance ......................................................................................................................................... 37  4.5.4 Directivity ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 41  4.5.5 Input Resistance  ................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 42  .4.6 HALF‐WAVELENGTH DIPOLE ......................................................................................................................................................................................................... 45 4.7 LINEAR ELEMENTS NEAR OR ON INFINITE PERFECT CONDUCTORS ............................................................................................................................................. 49  4.7.1 Image Theory ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 50  4.7.2 Vertical Electric Dipole ....................................................................................................................................................................................................... 53  1.  Radiation pattern ................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 54  2.  Radiation power and directivity  ......................................................................................................................................................................................... 57  . 3.  monopole ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 61  4.7.4 Antennas for Mobile Communication Systems ................................................................................................................................................................. 63  4.7.5 Horizontal Electric Dipole .................................................................................................................................................................................................. 67 PROBLEMS .......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 74    
  • 2.  4.1 1 INTROD DUCTION Wire  antennas, a , linear or curved,  are some e of the o oldest, sim mplest, cheapest, an nd the mo ile for many applica ost versati ations.   4.2 2 INFINITESIMAL D DIPOLE  Infinitesimal dipol les are no ot practica al, they ar re used to o represen nt capacit tor‐plate  antennas   s.  In additio on, they a are utilized as build ding more e complex x geometr ries.    The  end  pl lates  are used  to  e  provide c e loading  to mainta capacitive ain  the  current  on  the  dippole  neaarly  uniform.      
  • 3.   The  plates  are  very  small,  their  radiation  is  usually  negligible.  The  wire,  in addition to being very small (l <<), is very thin ( ). The spatial variation of the current is assumed to be constant    ′ ;     =  constant                      (4‐1) 4.2.1 Radiated Fields To  find  the  fields  radiated  by  the  current  element,  it  will  be  required  to determine first    and    and then find the    and  .  1. Calculation of    Since  the  source  only  carries  an  electric  current  ,  therefore    and  the potential function    are zero. To find    we write  , , ′ ′                  (4‐2)  x, y, z   : the observation point ;      x’, y’, z’ : the source coordinates        : the distance from any point on the source to the observation point  path C    : is along the length of the source    
  • 4.  Fo or the problem of F Figure 4.1 , , 4‐3 0   (infinite esimal dip pole)  ′   so o we can w write (4‐2) as  / , , /          (4‐4)        
  • 5.   2. Calculation of    and    To  calculate    and  ,  it  is  simpler  to  transform  (4‐4)  from  rectangular  to spherical components.              (4‐5)  0 For this problem,  0, so (4‐5) using (4‐4) reduces to                            (4‐6)  0 ⟹                     (4‐7) Substituting (4‐6) into (4‐7) reduces it to  0   (4‐8) 1 
  • 6.  Th he electric c field E ca an now be e found. T That is,  ∙   (4‐9)  1 1             (4‐10)  0 The  and  ‐field  components are valid  ev e  verywher except on  the  re,  t so ource  itself,  and  th are  sketched  hey  sin  Figure  4 4.1(b)  on the  surfa of  a  ace sp phere of ra adius  .      
  • 7.  4.2.2 Power Density and Radiation Resistance The input impedance of an antenna consists of real and imaginary parts. For a lossless antenna, the real part of the input impedance was radiation resistance.    To find the input resistance for a lossless antenna, the following procedure is taken.    For the infinitesimal dipole, the complex Poynting vector can be written using (4‐8a)–(4‐8b) and (4‐10a)–(4‐10c) as  1 ∗ 1 ∗   2 2 ∗ ∗                                 (4‐11)  
  • 8.   1 ⟹   (4‐12)  | | 1 Since     is  imaginary,  it  will  not  contribute  to  real  radiated  power.  The reactive  power  density,  which  is  most  dominant  for  small  values  of  ,  has  both radial and transverse components. It merely changes between outward and inward directions to form a standing wave at a rate of twice per cycle. It also moves in the transverse direction.  The  complex  power  moving  in  the  radial  direction  is  obtained  by  integrating (4‐11)–(4‐12b) over a closed sphere of radius r. Thus it can be written as  ∯ ∙ ∙ 4‐13 ⟹ 1         (4‐14)  Equation  (4‐13),  which  gives  the  real  and  imaginary  power  that  is  moving outwardly, can also be written as  
  • 9.   ∗ ∙   1 P j2ω W W    (4‐15) Where: P power in radial direction ; Prad time‐average power radiated W time‐average magnetic energy density in radial direction W time‐average electric energy density in radial direction 2 W W time‐average imaginary reactive power From (4‐14)  P   ;      2ω W W     (4‐16, 17)  It  is  clear  from  (4‐17)  that  When  kr ∞, the reactive power diminishes and vanishes.  
  • 10.  1. radiation resistance of the infinitesimal dipole  Since the antenna radiates its real power through the radiation resistance, for the infinitesimal dipole it is found by equating (4‐16) to    | | ⇒   80      (4‐18, 19)  For a wire antenna to be classified as an infinitesimal dipole, its overall length  must be very small (usually  ).                
  • 11.  Example 4.1  Find the radiation resistance of an infinitesimal dipole whose overall length is  /50. Solution:    Using (4‐19)    1 80 80 0.316   50 Since  the  radiation  resistance  of  an  infinitesimal  dipole  is  about  0.3  ohms,  it will present a very large mismatch when connected to practical transmission lines, many  of  which  have  characteristic  impedances  of  50  or  75  ohms.  The  reflection efficiency ( ) and hence the overall efficiency ( ) will be very small.          
  • 12.  2. The reactance of an infinitesimal dipole is capacitive.    This  can  be  illustrated  by  considering  the  dipole  as  a  flared  open‐circuited transmission line. Since the input impedance of an open‐circuited transmission line a distance    from its open end is given by      2where    is its characteristic impedance, it will always be negative (capacitive) for  ≪ .        
  • 13.  4.2.3 Near‐Field ( ) Region An inspection of (4‐8) and (4‐10) reveals that for    / 2  they can be approximated by  (4‐8a, 10c)  (4‐20c) (4‐8b)                        (4‐20d)            (4‐10a)                    (4‐20a)      (4‐10b)            (4‐20b)  The E‐field components,    and    are in time‐phase;  They are in time‐phase quadrature with the H‐field component     ;    Therefore  there  is  no  time‐average  power  flow  associated  with  them.  This  is demonstrated by forming the time‐average power density as  ∗ ∗ W Re E H∗ Re    
  • 14.   | | ⟹W Re 0        (4‐22)  Equations (4‐20a) and (4‐20b) are similar to those of a static electric dipole and (4‐20d) to that of a static current element. Thus we usually refer to (4‐20a)–(4‐20d) as the quasi‐stationary fields.                    
  • 15.  4.2.5 Intermediate‐Field (kr > 1) Region As  the  values  of    begin  to  increase  and  become  greater  than  unity,  the terms that were dominant for  ≪ 1 become smaller and eventually vanish.    1 (4‐8b)     (4‐23d)  1           (4‐10a)     (4‐23a)  1 (4‐10b)   (4‐23b)  For moderate values of  :   The  E‐field  components  lose  their  in‐phase  condition  and  approach  time‐phase quadrature.     Their  magnitude  is  not  the  same,  they  form  a  rotating  vector  whose  extremity  traces  an  ellipse.  This  is  analogous  to  the  polarization  problem  except  that  the  vector  rotates  in  a  plane  parallel  to  the  direction  of  propagation and is usually referred to as the cross field.  
  • 16.    At  these  intermediate  values  of  ,  the    and    components  approach  time‐phase,  which  is  an  indication  of  the  formation  of  time‐average power flow in the outward direction.  (4‐8a, 10c)  (4‐23c) (4‐8b)  (4‐23d) (4‐10a)  (4‐23a) (4‐10b) (4‐23b) The total electric field is given by                            (4‐24)          
  • 17.  4.2.6 Far‐Field (kr >> 1) Region In  a  region  where  ≫ 1 ,  (4‐23a) – (4‐23d)  can  be  simplified  and approximated by  (4‐8a, 10c)            (4‐26b)  (4‐8b)        (4‐26c)                  (4‐10a)                              (4‐26b)    (4‐10b)   (4‐26a)  The ratio of    to    is equal to  Z                         (4‐27)  The E‐ and H‐ field components are perpendicular to each other, transverse to the  radial  direction  of  propagation.  The  fields  form  a  Transverse  ElectroMagnetic (TEM) wave,its wave impedance is the intrinsic impedance of the medium.    
  • 18.  Example 4.2  For an infinitesimal dipole determine and interpret the vector effective length. At  what  incidence  angle  does  the  open‐circuit  maximum  voltage  occurs  at  the output terminals of the dipole if the electric‐field intensity of the incident wave is 10 mV/m? The length of the dipole is  10 cm.   Solution:    Using (4‐26a) and the effective length as defined by (2‐92), we can write that  4 26a ⟹    2 92The  maximum  value  occurs  at   90   and  it  is  equal  to .  The  open‐circuit maximum voltage is equal to  | ∙ | 10 10 ∙ | 10 volts    
  • 19.  4.2.7 Directivity The  real  power  P   radiated  by  the  dipole  was  found  in  Section  4.2.2,  as given by (4‐16). The same expression can be obtained by first forming the average power density, using (4‐26a)–(4‐26c). That is,  ∗ Re | |             (4‐28)  Integrating  (4‐28)  over  a  closed  sphere  of  radius  r  reduces  it  to  (4‐16). Associated with the average power density of (4‐28) is a radiation intensity U which is given by  | |   ⟹        (4‐29, 30)  Using (4‐16) and (4‐30), the directivity reduces to  4                         (4‐31) and the maximum effective aperture to                        (4‐32)  
  • 20.     
  • 21.  4.3   SMALL DIPOLE 3  E  The creation of th he current distribution on a a thin wiree was disscussed in n Section  1.4, and it was illu ustrated w with somee examplees in Figure 1.16.  The radiaation propperties of f an infinit tesimal di ipole were e discusseed in the previous  section. I Its curren nt distribution was assumed to be con nstant.    A consttant curre ent distrib bution is n not realizable. A be etter approximatioon of the cu urrent disttribution o ntennas, (/50 of wire an ( /10) is the tr riangular v variation, whhich is sho own in Fig gure 4.4(bb)  1 , 0 , , 1 , 0         (4 4‐33)   
  • 22.  Th he vector potential can be w written using (4‐33) as  / / 1 1   (4‐34)  Becausse the lenngth of th he dipole  is very sm mall /10 ,    for diff ferent  ’ alo wire are not much different  from  . T ong the w Thus    c can be ap pproximatted by   throughoutt the integ gration pa ath.    The  maximum  phase  error  in  (4 4‐34)  by  allowing will  be  /2 g  / /10 18   ffor  /10. Thiss amount  of phase  error hass very litt tle effect on rall radiation characteristics. Then, (4 n the over 4‐34) redu uces to (4‐ ‐35)  
  • 23.                     (4‐35) which is one‐half of that for the infinitesimal dipole.  /     Ref:      , , /               (4‐4) The potential function (4‐35) becomes a more accurate approximation as  kr → ∞.    Since the potential function for the triangular distribution is one‐half of the corresponding  one  for  the  constant  (uniform)  current  distribution,  the corresponding fields of the former are one‐half of the latter. Thus we can write the E‐ and H‐fields radiated by a small dipole as      (4‐26b)                (4‐36b)            (4‐26a)                        (4‐36a)            (4‐26c)                    (4‐36c)    
  • 24.   Since  the  directivity  of  an  antenna  is  controlled  by  the  relative  shape  of  the field or power pattern, the directivity, and maximum effective area of this antenna are the same as the ones with the constant current distribution given by (4‐31) and (4‐32), respectively.  Using  the  procedure  established  for  the  infinitesimal  dipole,  the  radiation resistance for the small dipole is              80     (4‐18)    | | 20           (4‐37)  The  small  dipole  its  radiated  power  is    of  (4‐18).  Thus  the  radiation resistance of the antenna is strongly dependent upon the current distribution.              
  • 25.  4.4   REGION SEPARATION  Before solving the fields radiated by a finite dipole of any length, it is desirable to discuss the separation of the space surrounding an antenna into three regions   The reactive near‐field   The radiating near‐field     The far‐field    To solve for the fields efficiently, approximations can be made to simplify the formulation.  The  difficulties  in  obtaining  closed  form  solutions  that  are  valid everywhere  for  any  practical  antenna  stem  from  the  inability  to  perform  the integration of  , , ′ ′                  (4‐2, 38) where                          (4‐38a)  In  the  calculations  for  infinitesimal  dipole  and  small  dipole.  The  major simplification of (4‐38) will be in the approximation of  R.  
  • 26.   The Fig gure showws a very tthin dipol le of finite e length l l symmetrically pos sitioned. Be ecause the e wire is v (x’ y’ 0), we very thin ( e can writte (4‐38) a as              (4‐39) wh hich can b be written n as  2   2 ′       (4‐40 0)    Us sing the binomial e expansion, we can w write (4‐4 40) in a se eries as  ⋯         (4‐41) wh hose higher order t terms bec come less s significan nt provide ed r >> z’. .  
  • 27.  4.4.1 Far‐Field (Fraunhofer) Region The most convenient simplification of (4‐41) is to approximate it by    ≃ ′                         (4‐42)  To maintain the maximum phase error of an antenna equal to or less than  /8 rad (22.5 ), the observation distance  r  must equal or be greater than  2 /.  2 /                         (4‐45)  The usual simplification for the far‐field region is    ≃ for phase terms                 (4‐46)  ≃ for amplitude terms 1/ Ref:          , , ′ ′                  (4‐38)  For any other antenna whose maximum dimension is  , the approximation of (4‐46) is valid provided  r 2D /λ                       (4‐47) For an aperture antenna the maximum dimension is taken to be its diagonal.  
  • 28.     It wou uld seem that thee approxiimation o R  in (4‐46) fo of  or the am mplitude is more sev vere than that fo or the pha ase.   Ex xample 44.3  For  an antenn with  an  overall  lengt n  na  th  5,  the  o observations  are made at  60. Find the e errors in phase and ampplitude ussing (4‐4 46). So olution:    For   90 ,  z’ , 2 2.5, and r d  6 60, (4‐40 0) reduce es to  
  • 29.   2 2 ′       (4‐40)   60 2.5 60.052  ≃ for phase terms With                                (4‐46)  ≃ for amplitude terms 1/ r 60 Therefore the phase difference is  2 ∆ ∆ 0.327 18.74 22.5  The difference of the inverse values of  R  is  1 1 1 1 1 1.44 10   60 60.052which should always be a very small value in amplitude.     
  • 30.  4.4.2 Radiating Near‐Field (Fresnel) Region If  the  observation  point  is  chosen  to  be  smaller  than  2 / ,  the  maximum phase error by the approximation of (4‐46) is greater than /8 rad (22.5o).    ≃ for phase terms                   (4‐46)  ≃ for amplitude terms 1/ If it is necessary to choose observation distances smaller than  2 / , another term  (the  third)  in  the  series  solution  of  (4‐41)  must  be  retained  to  maintain  a maximum phase error of /8 rad (22.5o).    ⋯          (4‐41)  Doing this, the infinite series of (4‐41) can be approximated by                         (4‐48)  A value of    greater than that of (4‐52a) will lead to an error less than /8 rad (22.5o).    
  • 31.   0.385       or      0.62 /           (4‐52, 4‐52a)  √ √ The  region  where  the  first  three  terms  of  (4‐41)  are  significant,  and  the omission  of  the  fourth  introduces  a  maximum  phase  error  of  /8  rad  (22.5o),  is defined by  / 2 0.62 /                                           (4‐53)  This region is designated as radiating near field because   The radiating power density is greater than the reactive power density   The field pattern is a function of the radial distance  r.    This  region  is  also  called  the  Fresnel  region  because  the  field  expressions  in this region reduce to Fresnel integrals.          
  • 32.  4.4.3 Reactive Near‐Field Region If the distance of observation is smaller than the inner boundary of the Fresnel region, this region is usually designated as reactive near‐field with inner and outer boundaries defined by  0.62 /   >   0                                          (4‐54)  In  summary,  the  space  surrounding  an  antenna  is  divided  into  three  regions whose boundaries are determined by  Reactive  near‐field                      0.62 /   >   0                          (4‐55a)  / Radiating  near‐field  (fresnel)          2 0.62 /                     (4‐55b)  / Far‐field  (fraunhofer)              2 0.62 /                     (4‐55c)          
  • 33.  4.5 FINITE LENGTH DIPOLE  The  techniques  developed  previously  can  be  used  to  analyze  the  radiation characteristics  of  a  linear  dipole  of  any  length.  To  reduce  the  mathematical complexities, it will be assumed that the dipole has a negligible diameter.   4.5.1 Current Distribution For  a  very  thin  dipole  (ideally  zero  diameter),  the  current  distribution  can  be written, to a good approximation, as  , 0 0, 0,            (4‐56)  , 0 This distribution assumes that the antenna is     center‐fed     the current vanishes at the end points.     Experiments have verified that the current in a center‐fed wire antenna has  sinusoidal form with nulls at the end points.      
  • 34.   For  /2  an /2 nd    t the  current  distrib bution  of  (4‐56)  is shown  f s plo otted in F Figures 1.1 16(b) and d (c), respeectively. T The geommetry of th he antenn na is that shown in Figure 4.5.       
  • 35.  4.5.2 Radiated Fields: Element Factor, Space Factor, and Pattern Multiplication Since  closed  form  solutions,  which  are  valid  everywhere,  cannot  be  obtained for many antennas, the observations will be restricted to the far‐field region.    The finite dipole antenna is subdivided into a number of infinitesimal dipoles of length  ’. For an infinitesimal dipole of length  dz’  positioned along the z‐axis at  z’, the electric and magnetic field components in the far field are given as  , ,      (4‐26a)      ′    (4‐57a)          (4‐26b)                 (4‐57b)  , ,       (4‐26b)        ′  (4‐57c) where  R  is given by (4‐39) or (4‐40).  Using the far‐field approximations given by (4‐46), (4‐57a) can be written as  
  • 36.   , , ′                (4‐58) Summing the contributions from all the infinitesimal elements to integration. Thus  / / / / , , ′            (4‐58a)   The factor outside the brackets is designated as the element factor     And that within the brackets as the space factor.    For  this  antenna,  the  element  factor  is  equal  to  the  field  of  a  unit  length infinitesimal  dipole  located  at  a  reference  point.  The  total  field  of  the  antenna  is equal to the product of the element and space factors.  For the current distribution of (4‐56), (4‐58a) can be written as  ′  4 / 2 / ′ ′         (4‐60)  ⇒               (4‐62a)  
  • 37.   The total    component can be written as                    (4‐62b) 4.5.3 Power Density, Radiation Intensity, and Radiation Resistance For the dipole, the average Poynting vector can be written as  ∗ ∗ ∗    | |   | |             (4‐63) and the radiation intensity as  | |                   (4‐64)  The normalized elevation power patterns, for  /4, /2, 3/4, and    are shown in Figure 4.6. The current distribution of each is given by (4‐56). The power patterns  for  an  infinitesimal  dipole  ≪      is  also  included  for comparison.    
  • 38.   It  is  found  that  the  3‐dB  0 0 330 30beamwidth of each is equal to  -10 ≪ : 3dB beamwidth 90 300 60 -20 /4: 3dB beamwidth 87 /2: 3dB beamwidth 78 -30 3/4: 3dB beamwidth 64 -40 270 90 : 3dB beamwidth 47.8 -30 As  the  length  of  the  antenna  -20 240 120increases,  the  beam  becomes  -10narrower.  Because  of  that,  the  0 210 150 180directivity  should  also  increase  with  1/50 1/4 1/2length.  3/4 1   As the dipole’s length increases beyond one wavelength   , the number of  lobes  begin  to  increase.  The  normalized  power  pattern  for  a  dipole  with  1.25  is shown in Figure 4.7.    
  • 39.   Figure 4.7(a) is the e three‐di imensiona al pattern n  Figure 4.7(b) is the e two‐dim mensional pattern The  cuurrent  di istribution for  th dipole with  n  he  es  /4, /2, , 3/ and 2,  as  given  by  (4 /2, 4‐56),  is shown in Figure 4.8. 0 0 330 30 -1 10 300 60 -2 20 -3 30 -4 270 40 90 -3 30 -2 20 240 120 -1 10   0 210 150 180 Figure 4.8 Current dist   tributions  Fig gure 4.7 Thr ree‐ and twoo‐dimensionnal amplitudde patterns f ength of a li for a thin  along the le inear wire   and sinuso dipole of l = 1.25 t distribution.  oidal current antenna.  To  find the  total  power radiated the  average  Po d  r  d,  oynting  ve ector  of  (4‐63)  is int tegrated o over a sphhere of ra adius r. Th hus  
  • 40.   ∯ ∙ ∮ ∙     | | ∮         (4‐66)  After some extensive mathematical manipulations, it can be reduced to  | | 1 2 2 4 2 /2 2 2               (4‐68) where  C 0.5772  (Euler’s  constant)  and  Ci x   and  Si x   are  the  cosine  and sine integrals given by  ;      4 68a, b   The radiation resistance can be obtained using (4‐18) and (4‐68)    2 1 2 2   | | 2 2              /2 2 2           (4‐70)  
  • 41.  4.5.4 Directivity The directivity was defined mathematically by (2‐22), or  , | 4                            (4‐71)  ,where  F ,    is related to the radiation intensity  U  by (2‐19), or  ,                           (4‐72)  From (4‐64), the dipole antenna of length    has  | | F θ, ϕ F θ ,    B η               (4‐73,73b) Because the pattern is not a function of  , (4‐71) reduces to  |                               (4‐74)  , The  corresponding  values  of  the  maximum  effective  aperture  are  related  to the directivity by                                  (4‐76)  
  • 42.  4.5.5 Inpu ut Resista ance The inp put imped dance was defined d as“the  ratio of t the voltag ge to curr rent at a pa of  term air  minals  or the  ratio  of  the  appropri r  iate  comp ponents  of  the  ele o ectric  to ma agnetic fie elds at a p point.” The reaal part of the input t impedan nce was deefined as the input t resistanc ce which for a lossles ss antenna reduces adiation resistance.  s to the raTh radiati he  ion  resist tance  of  a  dipole of  leng l  with  e  gth sin current distribution nusoidal c n is expres ssed by (4 4‐70).  2   | | 1 2 2   2 2 /2 2 2                 (4‐70 0)   
  • 43.   By the  definition n, the rad diation resistance i is referred d to the m maximum m current whhich for so /4, 3/4, , etc.) do ome lengths (l = / he input terminals  oes not occur at thof the antennna.    To refe er the radiation res sistance to o the inpu ut terminals of the antenna, the ant tenna is f first assum med to be e lossless  (RL = 0).  Then  th power  at  the  in he  nput  term minals  is  e equated  to the  o po ower at th he currennt maximu um. Refer rring to Figure 4.10 0, we can write  | | | | ⟹         (4‐77)   Figure 4.10 Current  here wh distribution, m maximum  does not occcur at the  R   rad diation re esistance a at input (f feed) term minals  minals.  input term R   = ra adiation resistance e at curren nt maximu umEq. (4‐ ‐70)  I   = cu urrent maximum  I   = cu urrent at input term minals  dipole of  length l,  the curre For a d e input terminals (I   ) is re ent at the elated to  
  • 44.  the current maximum m (I ) ref ferring to Figure 4.10, by                    (4‐78)  he input ra Thus th adiation r resistance a) can be written a e of (4‐77a as                        (4‐79)    gure 4.9 RFig Radiation resistanc ce, input r resistance e and directivity of a thin dip pole with  sinu usoidal cu urrent distribution. .  
  • 45.  4.6 HALF‐WAVELENGTH DIPOLE  One  of  the  most  commonly  used  antennas  is  the  half‐wavelength  (l =  /2) dipole. Because   Its  radiation  resistance  is  73  ohms  very  near  the  50/75‐ohm  characteristic  impedances of some transmission lines,     Its matching to the line is simplified especially at resonance.    The electric and magnetic field components of a half‐wavelength dipole can be obtained from (4‐62a) and (4‐62b) by letting l = /2.        ,              (4‐84, 85)  The  time‐average  power  density  and  radiation  intensity  can  be  written, respectively, as  | | | |                         (4‐86)  | | | |                       (4‐86)  
  • 46.   Figure 4 4.6 and 4.11 show the two‐ and the t three‐ dim mensional l pattern.    0 0 330 30 -10 0 300 60 -20 0 -30 0 -40 -40 270 0 90 -30 0 -20 0 240 120 -10 0 0 210 150 180  Th he total po ower radiated can be obtain ned as a special cas se of (4‐67 7)  | |       (4‐88)  | | | | 2           (4‐89) By y (4‐69)  2 0.577 72  ln 2 2 2 0.5 5772 1.838 0.02  2 2.435     (4‐90)  
  • 47.   Using (4‐87), (4‐89) and (4‐90), the maximum directivity of the half‐wavelength dipole reduces to  | /   4 4 1.643                (4‐91)  . The corresponding maximum effective area is equal to  1.643 0.13                 (4‐92) and the radiation resistance, for a free‐space medium ( 120), is    | | 2 30 2.435 73                  (4‐93)  The radiation resistance of (4‐93) is also the radiation resistance at the input terminals  (input  resistance)  since  the  current  maximum  for  a  dipole  of  /2 occurs  at  the  input  terminals.  As  it  will  be  shown  later,  the  imaginary  part associated  with  the  input  impedance  of  a  dipole  is  a  function  of  its  length  (for  /2, it is equal to  j42.5). Thus the total input impedance for  /2  is equal to  73 42.5                        (4‐93a)  
  • 48.   To reduce the imaginary part of the input impedance to zero, the antenna is matched  or  reduced  in  length  until  the  reactance  vanishes.  The  latter  is  most commonly used in practice for half‐wavelength dipoles.   Depending  on  the  radius  of  the  wire,  the  length  of  the  dipole  for  first  resonance  is  about  0.47 to 0.48;  the  thinner  the  wire,  the  closer  the length is to  0.48.   For  thicker  wires,  a  larger  segment  of  the  wire  has  to  be  removed  from  /2  to achieve resonance.           
  • 49.  4.7 LINEAR ELEMENTS NEAR OR ON INFINITE PERFECT CONDUCTORS  The presence of obstacles, especially when it is near the radiating element, can significantly alter the overall radiation properties.  The  most  common  obstacle  is  the  ground.  Any  energy  from  the  radiating element  directed  toward  the  ground  undergoes  a  reflection.  The  amount  of reflected energy and its direction are controlled by the ground.  The  ground  is  a  lossy  medium  (  0)  whose  effective  conductivity  increases with frequency. Therefore it should be expected to act as a good conductor above a  certain  frequency,  depending  primarily  upon  its  composition  and  moisture content. To simplify the analysis,  First assuming the ground is a perfect electric conductor, flat, and infinite.    The  same  procedure  can  also  be  used  to  investigate  the  characteristics  of  any radiating element near any other infinite, flat, perfect electric conductor.    The  effects  that  finite  dimensions  have  on  the  radiation  properties  of  a radiating  element  can  be  accounted  for  by  the  use  of  the  Geometrical  Theory  of Diffraction and/or the Moment Method.  
  • 50.  4.7.1 Imag ge Theor ry To  analyze  the  performaance  of  an antenna near  an infinite  plane  conductor,  n  a  n vir rtual  sour duced  to  account  for  the  reflections,  which  rces  (images)  will  be  introd rwhhen comb bined with the real sources, form an n equivale ent system m. The eq quivalent system  give the  same  radiated  field  on  and  a es  above  the  conduc ctor  as  th actual  he system itself. Below the condu uctor, thee field is zero.    (a) Vertical electric dip pole          (b b) Field com mponents at point of ref flection  Figure 4 4.12 Vertical electric dipole abo ove an infin nite, flat, p perfect elec ctric condu uctor  
  • 51.   The  amount  of  reflection  is  generally  determined  by  the  respective constitutive parameters of the media below and above the interface.    For  a  perfect  electric  conductor  below  the  interface,  the  incident  wave is completely reflected and the field below the boundary is zero.    Vertical polarization  The tangential components of the electric field must vanish on the interface. Thus for an incident electric field with vertical polarization, the polarization of the reflected waves must be as indicated in the figure. To excite the polarization of the reflected waves, the virtual source must also be vertical and with a polarity in the same direction as that of the actual source (thus a reflection coefficient of  1).  Horizontal polarization  Another  orientation  of  the  source  will  be  to  have  the  radiating  element  in  a horizontal position, the virtual source (image) is also placed a distance h below the interface but with a  180   polarity difference relative to the actual source (thus a reflection coefficient of  1).  
  • 52.   In  addi ition  to  electric  so e ources,  artificial  equivalent t“magne etic”sour rces  and ma agnetic co onductors s have been introduced.    Figure  4 4.13(a)  displays  th source and  their  imag for  a electric  plane  he  es  ges  an  conducto The  d or.  direction  of  the  arrow  id dentifies  the  polarity.  Sinc many  ce  problems s can be s solved usiing duality   y.  Figure  4. .13(b)  illu ustrates  th source and  their  image when  the  obstacle  is  an  he  es  es  t flat, perfe “magnetic” conducto infinite, f ect  or.    (a) E Electric con nductor                (b) Magnetic conductor r  Figure 4 4.13 Electr gnetic sources and th ric and mag heir images near elec ctric (PEC) and  magnetic (PMC) cond m ductors.  
  • 53.  4.7.2 Vertiical Electtric Dipoole Assumi ing a vertical electr ric dipole is placed a distancce    above an infinite, flat, pe erfect elec ctric cond ductor as sshown in Figure 4.1 12(a).    For an ob bservation point P1, there is s a  rect wave  dir e.      On the  interface, the incid dent wave e is comp pletely ref flected annd the field below the bounda ary is zero o. The tanngential c componen nts of thee electric  field mus st vanish  n the interon rface.     
  • 54.  1. Radiation pattern (1) Direct component  The far‐zone direct component of the electric field of the infinitesimal dipole of  length  ,  constant  current  ,  and  observation  point  P  is  given  according  to (4‐26a) by                     (4‐94) (2) The reflected component    The  reflected  component  can  be  accounted  for  by  the  introduction  of  the virtual source (image), as shown in Figure 4.14(a), and it can be written as          (4‐95,  4‐95a) (3) The total field  The total field above the interface (z≥0) is equal to the sum of the direct and reflected components as given by (4‐94) and (4‐95a). In general, we can write that  / / 2 ,    2   (4‐96a, b)  
  • 55.   bservation r ≫ h ,  (4‐96a and  (4‐96b)  reduce  us For  far‐field  ob ns a)  sing  the bin nomial exxpansion tto  ,               ( (4‐97a,b)                   (4‐98)  2 cos z 0      (4‐99)  0 0 
  • 56.   The shaape and a amplitude e of the field is not t only con ntrolled b by the field of the sin ngle  elem ment  but  also  by  th positio a he  oning  of  t eleme relativ to  the  ground.  the  ent  ve Th normalized  pow patte he  wer  erns  for  0, /8, /4, 3 /8, /2, and   have  been  aplo otted in F Figure 4.155..  0 5 15 0 15 0 30 30 -10 0 45 45 -20 0 60 60 -30 0 h=0 5 75 75 -40 0 h=1/8 8 h=3/8 -50 0 h=1/4 4 90 9 h=1/2 90 h=1 -40 0 10 05 105 -30 0 -20 0 120 120 -10 0 135 135 0 150 150 180 16 65 180 165     For  h λ/4  more minor lobes, in n addition n to the m major one es, are for rmed. As h  attains  v reater  than  λ,  an even  greater  nu values  gr n  umber  of  minor  lobes  is int troduced.   .  
  • 57.   0 15 0 30 -10 45 These  are  shown  in  Figure  4.16  for  -20 60h 2λ   and  5λ .  In  general,  the  total  -30 75 -40number of lobes is equal to the integer that  -50 h=2 90 h=5is closest to  -40 105 -30 2 120 number of lobes 1  -20 -10 135 0 150 180 165  2. Radiation power and directivity The total radiated power over the upper hemisphere of radius r using  / 1 ∙ | |   2 / | |                           (4‐101) which simplifies, with the aid of (4‐99), to  
  • 58.                     (4‐102)  As  kh → ∞  the  radiated  power,  as  given  by  (4‐102),  is  equal  to  that  of  an  isolated element.    As  kh → 0, it can be shown that the power is twice that of an isolated element.  The radiation intensity can be written as    | |               (4‐103)                                  (4‐103) The directivity can be written as    4                         (4‐104) The maximum value occurs when  kh 2.881 h 0.4585 , and it is equal to 6.566  which  is  greater  than  four  times  that  of  an  isolated  element  (1.5).  The pattern for  h 0.4585  is shown plotted in Figure 4.17 while the  directivity,  as given by (4‐104), is displayed in Figure 4.18 for  0 h 5.  
  • 59.     Figure 4.17 Elevation plane amplitu ude pattern n of a vertica al infinitesim mal electric d dipole at a h height of  0.4585 ab bove an infin nite perfect electric connductor. Us sing (4‐10 02), the radiation re esistance can be written as | | 2              (4‐105)                  (4‐19) Th radiation  resista he  4.18  for 0 h ance  is  plotted  in  Figure  4 p 0 5  when  =  /50  5an nd the element is ra adiating innto free‐s space (η  120).    
  • 60.     Figure 4.18 Directivity and radiation i D n n resistance of a vertical infinitesimal electric d dipole as a fu unction of  its height above an infinite perfectt electric conductor              
  • 61.  3. monopo ole In  prac ctice,  a  w wide  use  has  been made  o a  quar n  of  rter‐wavelength  m monopole ( λ/4)  m mounted  above  a  g a ground  plane,  and fed  by  a coaxial  line,  as  s d  a  shown  in Fig gure  4.199(a).  For  analysis  purposes a λ/4 image  is  introduc s,  ced  and  it  forms the λ/2  eq quivalent  of  Figur 4.19(b).  It  should  be  e re  emphasize that  the  λ/2  ed eqquivalent  of Figure 4.19(b) g gives the  correct field value es for the e actual sy ystem of  gure 4.19(a) only above the interfaceFig e (z 0, 0 θ /2).         gure 4.19 Quarter‐Fig ‐waveleng gth monopole on a an infinite perfect e electric co onductor    
  • 62.   Thus,  the  far‐zone  electric  and  magnetic  fields  for  the  λ/4  monopole  above the ground plane are given, respectively, by (4‐84) and (4‐85).     ,            (4‐84, 4‐85)  The  input  impedance  of  a  λ/4  monopole  above  a  ground  plane  is  equal  to one‐half  that  of  an  isolated  λ/2  dipole.  Thus,  referred  to  the  current  maximum, the input impedance  Z   is given by  Z monopole Z dipole 73 j42.5 36.5 j21.25          (4‐106)              
  • 63.  4.7.4 Antennas for Mobile Communication Systems  The  dipole  and  monopole  are  two  of  the  most  widely  used  antennas  for  wireless mobile communication systems.    An  array  of  dipole  elements  is  extensively  used  as  an  antenna  at  the  base  station of a land mobile system while the monopole, because of its broadband  characteristics and simple construction, is perhaps to most common antenna  element  for  portable  equipment,  such  as  cellular  telephones,  cordless  telephones, automobiles, trains, etc.    An  alternative  to  the  monopole  for  the  handheld  unit  is  the  loop.  Other  elements include the inverted F, planar inverted F antenna (PIFA), microstrip  (patch), spiral, and others.  The variations of the input impedance, real and imaginary parts, of a vertical monopole antenna mounted on an experimental unit are shown in Figure 4.21.    
  • 64.     
  • 65.     Figure 4.21    Input impedance, real and i imaginary parts, of a ve ertical mono opole mount ted on an  expe erimental ce hone device   ellular teleph e. It  is  a apparent  that  the  first  reso onance,  around  1,0 MHz,  is  slowly varying  000  y values  of  immpedance versus frequency and  of desirable  magnitude,  for  practical  e  y,  f  
  • 66.  im mplementa ation.    Above the first t resonance, the im mpedance e is induct tive. The s second re esonance rapid  changes  in  th values of  the  impedance.  These values  and  variation  of  he  s  e im mpedance are usually undesirable for practical implementation.                 
  • 67.  4.7 7.5 Horizo ontal Elec ctric Dipo ole When the  line eleme n  ear  ent is  placed ho orizontally y relative e to the  infinitte  electric  grou und plaane, as sh hown in Fiigure 4.24   4.    Fig gure 4.24 Ho orizontal eleectric dipole,, and its associated  imaage, above a an infinite, f flat, perfect nductor  t electric con The  aanalysis  p procedure of  this  is identica to  the  one  of  th vertica dipole.  e  s  al  he  al Int troducing an  imag and  assuming  far  field  observat g  ge  a tions,  as  shown  in  Figure 4.2 25(a, b),        
  • 68.              (a) Horizontal electric c dipole abo ove ground p plane                 (b) Far‐ ‐field observ vations  gure 4.25 Ho Fig orizontal ele ectric dipole e above an infinite perfe ect electric conductor oefficient  is  equal  to  R Since  the  reflection  co 1,  The  direct  and  the ref flect components c can be wr ritten as                   (4‐111)  ⟹             (4‐112)  ind  the  angle ψ ,  which  is  measu To  fi ured  from the  y‐ m  ‐axis  tow ward  the ob bservation n point, w we first for rm  
  • 69.   ∙ ∙   (4‐113)  ⟹ 1 1                   (4‐114) Since for far‐field observations        for phase variations            (4‐115a)              for  amplitude  variations            (4‐115b) the total field, which is valid only above the ground plane (z≥h; 0≤θ≤/2, 0≤ ≤2), can be written as  E 1 sin sin 2 sin cos       (4‐116)  Equation (4‐116) again consists of the product of the field of a single isolated element  placed  symmetrically  at  the  origin  and  a  factor  (within  the  brackets) known as the array factor.      
  • 70.   The  t two‐dime ensional  elevation  epla ane  patte rmalized  to  0  dB)  erns  (norfor  = 900 ( e) when h = 0, /8,  (y‐z plane/ 3/8,  /2,  and   are  p /4,  d  plotted  in   Fig gure 4.26. Since this antenn na system is  not symmmetric witth respectt to the z ax the  az xis,  zimuthal  plane  (x‐ plane)  ‐y paattern is not isotrop     pic. Fi ane ( = 900) igure 4.26 Elevation pla ) amplitude patterns off a horizontaal infinitesim mal electric d dipole for  diffe erent height ts above an infinite perfect electric c conductor. . As the height  increases beyond o one wave elength (h h ), a  larger nuumber of lob ain formed, as in Fi bes is aga igure 4‐16 6 for the  vertical d dipole. The e total nu umber of lob bes is equ hat most closely is equal to ual to the integer th 
  • 71.   number of lobes                       (4‐117)  The radiated power can be written as                      (4‐118)  The radiation resistance as  | |             (4‐119)  For small values of    →           (4‐120)  For kh→∞, (4‐119) reduces to that of an isolated element.  80   The  radiation  resistance,  as  given  by  (4‐119),  is  plotted  in  Figure  4.29  for 0 h 5   when  λ/50   and  the  antenna  is  radiating  into  free‐space ( 120 ).  
  • 72.     Fig gure 4.29 Ra adiation res sistance and d maximum directivity oof a horizonttal infinitesimal electric c dipole as  a funct tion of its he perfect electric conduct eight above an infinite p tor.  The radiation in ntensity is given by   1             (4‐121) Th he maximum value e of (4‐121) depends on the e value of f  hether kh≤/2, h    (wh≤/4 or kh h > /2,h > >/4). It c can be sho own that the maxim mum of (4 4‐121) is: 
  • 73.   , , 0 4 122 2 4   , , 0 sin 1 4 122 2 4The directivity can be written as  4 , 4 123 4 4   4 , 4 123 4where                (4‐123c) For small values of kh (kh  →  0), (4‐123a) reduces to  4 sin 7.5   2 2 8 3 3 15For h = 0 the element is shorted and it does not radiate.  
  • 74.  PROBLEMS 4.1.  A  horizontal  infinitesimal  electric  dipole  of  constant  current  I0  is  placed  symmetrically about the origin and directed along the x‐axis. Derive the  (a) far‐zone fields radiated by the dipole  (b) directivity of the antenna 4.2. Repeat Problem 4.1 for a horizontal infinitesimal electric dipole directed along  the y‐axis. 4.22. A thin linear dipole of length l is placed symmetrically about the z‐axis. Find  the  far‐zone  spherical  electric  and  magnetic  components  radiated  by  the  dipole whose current distribution can be approximated by  1 , 0 (a)    1 , 0 (b)  ,          (c)  ,         4.23.  A  center‐fed  electric  dipole  of  length  l  is  attached  to  a  balanced  lossless  transmission  line  whose  characteristic  impedance  is  50  ohms.  Assuming  the  
  • 75.   dipole is resonant at the given length, find the input VSWR when    (a)  /4    (b)  /2  (c)    3 /4    (d)   4.26.  A  resonant  center‐fed  dipole  is  connected  to  a  50‐ohm  line.  It  is  desired  to  maintain the input VSWR = 2.  (a)  What should the largest input resistance of the dipole be to maintain the  VSWR = 2?  (b)  What  should  the  length  (in  wavelengths)  of  the  dipole  be  to  meet  the  specification?  (c) What is the radiation resistance of the dipole? 4.29. A base‐station cellular communication system utilizes arrays of  λ/2  dipoles  as  transmitting  and  receiving  antennas.  Assuming  that  each  element  is  lossless  and  that  the  input  power  to  each  of  the  λ/2  dipoles  is  1  watt,  determine at 1,900 MHz and a distance of 5 km the maximum  (a) radiation intensity Specify also the units.  
  • 76.   (b) radiation density (in watts/m2) 4.30. A  /2  dipole situated with its center at the origin radiates a time‐averaged  power of  600 W  at a frequency of  300 MHz. A second  /2  dipole is placed  with  its  center  at  a  point  P r, θ, φ ,  where  r 200 m, θ 90 , φ 40 .  It  is  oriented  so  that  its  axis  is  parallel  to  that  of  the  transmitting  antenna.  What  is  the  available  power  at  the  terminals  of  the  second  (receiving) dipole?  

×