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Step Up To Writing Program Provides Effective

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  • 1. Step Up to Writing program provides effective, multisensory writing strategies to improve students’ overall literacy skills. This flexible, strategy-based program connects reading and writing to build a common language of literacy and increase proficiency across grade levels and content areas. T Extensive modeling, guided practice, and independent practice improve student writing, reading comprehension, vocabulary, note-taking, and critical-thinking skills. Students learn to read, write, listen, speak, and view with skill and confidence. Because these critical 21st century literacy skills are also reflected in the Alabama English Language Arts Standards, the Step Up to Writing program is a natural fit for improving overall K-12 student literacy. When reading and using this document, please note that this document refers specifically to the Grade 3 Benchmarks and that key words, phrases, and concepts have been intentionally bolded to show the correlation between Step Up and Alabama’s English Language Arts Standards. Step Up Section references refer to the 3rd edition (2008); the program also applies to the content, tools, and strategies found in the 1st and 2nd editions. Grade 3 Reading Standards & Benchmarks Standard/Benchmarks 1: Apply advanced phonetic analysis to multiple-syllable words, including consonants, short vowels, blends, long vowel markers, and r-controlled vowels. Step Up to Writing Students are given a variety of active reading strategies (opportunities to apply phonetic analysis) to better comprehend all texts, both fiction and non-fiction, written and visual. From recognizing text structures and features to marking and annotating a text, students are equipped with multisensory literacy strategies for analyzing and evaluating texts, making inferences, drawing conclusions and synthesizing information. Teachers are provided with examples to model with their students and guided lessons to incorporate into all subject areas, not just English/language arts, to aid students identifying main ideas and support details and making textual connections. For example: ♣ Section 1: Writing to improve reading and listening comprehension (Making connections between the reading and self/text/world; marking and highlighting the text; taking effective notes; making inferences and analyzing the text; paraphrasing, retelling and summarizing content; recognizing varying text structures; asking and answering questions) ♣ Section 2: Vocabulary (Developing a strong vocabulary across content areas; homophones and homonyms) ♣ Section 3: Sentence mastery (Identifying parts of speech; playing with language; analyzing sentence structures; writing with a variety of sentences) Page 2 of 10 Standard/Benchmarks 2: Demonstrate reading vocabulary knowledge of compound words. In order to meet this standard, students will/are ♣
  • 2. Using structural analysis to develop meaning (Examples: prefixes, suffixes, root words) ♣ Drawing semantic maps ♣ Recognizing new synonyms and antonyms ♣ Spelling correctly compound words, phonetically regular words, contractions, and possessives, including using dictionary to check spelling Step Up to Writing Vocabulary development is a critical component of the Step Up to Writing program. Students are given a multitude of strategies to learn, comprehend, and use new vocabulary words. The activities are not simply used in English/language arts, but encourage vocabulary development within specific content areas. Teachers model various strategies such as analyzing word/sentence structures, creating concept maps to extend understanding of a word, and creating meaningful sentences that demonstrate understanding of a word’s definition and usage. Writing assignments – both informational/expository and narrative – challenge students to use new vocabulary words appropriately in the context of their own writing; scoring guides and other assessment tools give feedback to the students about their progress. For example: ♣ Section 1: Writing to improve reading and listening comprehension (Using active reading strategies for responding to the text; making connections between the text and the self/other texts/world; marking the text; taking effective notes; analyzing the text and making inferences; paraphrasing, retelling and summarizing; asking and answering questions) ♣ Section 2: Vocabulary (Mastering vocabulary; teaching tips for reading dictionary definitions, breaking down definitions, using correct pronunciation, developing concept maps, creating meaningful vocabulary sentences with context; using vocabulary note cards to develop definition/synonyms/antonyms/part of speech, categorizing vocabulary words and content-specific terminology, understanding homonyms/homophones/homographs, and developing subject-specific vocabulary) ♣ Section 3: Sentence mastery (Identifying parts of speech; playing with language; analyzing sentence structures; writing with a variety of sentences) ♣ Section 4-7 (Recognizing and working with two kinds of writing: expository/informational and narrative; defining fiction, non-fiction, prose, poetry, explain, and entertain; understanding story structure and terminology; considering audience, purpose, and message in word choice) ♣ Section 9: Specific writing assignments (Array of writing/speaking forms and genres including persuasive, compare/contrast, cause/effect, poetry, dramatic skit, descriptive, and more) ♣
  • 3. Section 10: Assessment and high standards (Using quick checks for self-evaluation; using practical and effective scoring guides that provide feedback on organization, content, style, and grammar/ mechanics/usage; analyzing examples of below basic, basic, proficient, and advanced writing; recording and monitoring own progress) Standard/Benchmarks 3: Use a wide range of strategies, including using context clues and predicting outcomes, to comprehend third-grade recreational reading materials in a variety of genres. In order to meet this standard, students will/are ♣ Reading fluently 110-120 words per minute ♣ Identifying literary elements and devices (Examples: characters, similes) ♣ Determining sequence of events ♣ Distinguishing fiction from nonfiction ♣ Using sentence structure to assist in comprehension ♣ Drawing conclusions to determine authors' intent © 2008 Maureen Auman, Read-Write Connection, LLC. All rights reserved. Created for Step Up to Writing trainers, and teachers, school administrators, curriculum coordinators, and leadership teams implementing and using Step Up to Writing. Page 3 of 10 ♣ Using self-monitoring for text understanding, including rereading and adjusting rate and speed of reading ♣ Using vocabulary knowledge to construct meaning ♣ Relating main ideas to prior knowledge and specific life experiences ♣ Previewing and predicting to anticipate content ♣ Utilizing text features to gain meaning ♣ Using prior knowledge and experience Step Up to Writing Students are given a variety of active reading strategies to better comprehend all texts, both fiction and non-fiction, written and visual. From recognizing text structures and features to marking and annotating a text, students are equipped with multisensory literacy strategies for finding main ideas and supporting details, analyzing and evaluating texts, making inferences, drawing conclusions and connections, and synthesizing information. Teachers are provided with examples to model with their students and guided lessons to incorporate into all subject areas, not just English/language arts.
  • 4. For example: ♣ Section 1: Writing to improve reading and listening comprehension (Various strategies for making connections between the message and the self/other texts/world; taking effective reading and research notes; making inferences and analyzing the text; paraphrasing, retelling and summarizing main ideas and details; asking and answering questions; recognizing text structures; using informal outlines) ♣ Section 2: Vocabulary (Developing a strong vocabulary across content areas) ♣ Sections 4-5 (Recognizing and working with two kinds of writing: expository/informational and narrative; defining fiction, non-fiction, prose, poetry, explain, and entertain; creating informal outlines) ♣ Sections 6-7 (Understanding story structure and terms; recognizing narrative patterns; quick sketches; story maps) ♣ Section 8: Speeches (Asking and answering questions; developing good listening skills; participating in one-on-one and large group discussions) ♣ Section 9: Specific writing assignments (Array of non-fiction and informational forms including persuasive writing; supporting opinion with fact; compare/contrast; cause/effect; technical writing; science reports; writing in math) Standard/Benchmarks 4: Use a wide range of strategies and skills, including retelling information, using context clues, and making inferences to identify main idea, to comprehend third-grade informational and functional reading materials. In order to meet this standard, students will/are ♣ Using sentence structure to assist in comprehension ♣ Distinguishing main idea from details ♣ Summarizing passages to demonstrate understanding ♣ Utilizing text features to gain meaning (Examples: titles, headings, glossary, boldface, index, table of contents, maps, charts, tables) ♣ Using vocabulary knowledge to enhance comprehension ♣ Using self-monitoring for text understanding ♣ Following simple written directions ♣ Ordering by importance or chronology Step Up to Writing Students are given a variety of active reading strategies to better comprehend all texts,
  • 5. both fiction and non-fiction, written and visual. From recognizing text structures and features to marking and annotating a text, students are equipped with multisensory literacy strategies for analyzing and evaluating texts, making inferences, drawing conclusions and synthesizing information. Teachers are provided with examples to model with their students and guided lessons to incorporate into all subject areas, not just English/language arts. © 2008 Maureen Auman, Read-Write Connection, LLC. All rights reserved. Created for Step Up to Writing trainers, and teachers, school administrators, curriculum coordinators, and leadership teams implementing and using Step Up to Writing. Page 4 of 10 For example: ♣ Section 1: Writing to improve reading and listening comprehension (Various strategies for making connections between the message and the self/other texts/world; taking effective reading and research notes; making inferences and analyzing the text; paraphrasing, retelling and summarizing main ideas and details; asking and answering questions; recognizing text structures; using informal outlines) ♣ Section 2: Vocabulary (Developing a strong vocabulary across content areas) ♣ Section 3: Sentence mastery (Writing better sentences; varying sentence structures; recognizing parts of speech; playing with language; considering audience, purpose, and message) ♣ Sections 4-5 (Recognizing and working with two kinds of writing: expository/informational and narrative; defining fiction, non-fiction, prose, poetry, explain, and entertain; creating informal outlines) ♣ Section 8: Speeches (Asking and answering questions; developing good listening skills; participating in one-on-one and large group discussions) ♣ Section 9: Specific writing assignments (Array of non-fiction and informational forms including persuasive writing; supporting opinion with fact; compare/contrast; cause/effect; technical writing; science reports; writing in math) ♣ Section 10: Assessment and high standards (Using quick checks for self-evaluation; using practical and effective scoring guides that provide feedback on organization, content, style, and grammar/ mechanics/usage; analyzing examples of below basic, basic, proficient, and advanced writing; recording and monitoring own progress) Standard/Benchmarks 5: Compare poetry, folktales, and fables in respect to their genre characteristics. Step Up to Writing As with writing for a variety of purposes, reading across content areas for various purposes enables students to strengthen their overall literacy skills. With Step Up to Writing students are taught active reading strategies to improve their comprehension of
  • 6. texts – fiction and non-fiction, and within specific subject areas. Students are not only given opportunities to read different forms and genres, but to also practice crafting their own texts in these forms and genres. For example: ♣ Section 1: Writing to improve reading and listening comprehension (Various strategies for making connections between the reading and the self/other texts/world; marking and highlighting the text; taking effective notes; making inferences and analyzing the text; paraphrasing, retelling and summarizing main ideas; recognizing text structure; asking and answering questions) ♣ Section 2: Vocabulary (Developing a strong vocabulary across content areas) ♣ Sections 4-7 (Reading and writing two kinds of texts: information/expository and narrative; analyzing organizational structures; understanding story elements and terminology; recognizing narrative patterns) ♣ Section 9: Specific writing assignments (Array of writing forms and genres including persuasive writing, supporting opinion with fact, compare/contrast, cause/effect, poetry, dramatic skit, descriptive, etc.) ♣ Section 10: Assessment and high standards (Setting high and clear expectations; participating in effective peer review; using self-evaluation quick checks; using scoring guides to reach proficient/advanced levels) Standard/Benchmarks 6: Recognize linguistic and cultural similarities and differences in multicultural literature. (Examples: regional dialects, clothing, food, games) Step Up to Writing To aid students in their analysis of language and culture, Step Up to Writing provides a variety of critical thinking strategies. In Step Up to Writing, teachers can model various reading and writing strategies and use guided lessons to help students successfully work with texts, writing assignments, and concepts that challenge their © 2008 Maureen Auman, Read-Write Connection, LLC. All rights reserved. Created for Step Up to Writing trainers, and teachers, school administrators, curriculum coordinators, and leadership teams implementing and using Step Up to Writing. Page 5 of 10 abilities and push them to a higher level. Students are given ample opportunities to independently practice active reading skills and respond to what they read in different formats. For example: ♣ Section 1: Writing to improve reading and listening comprehension (Making connections between the reading and self/text/world; taking effective notes; making inferences and analyzing the text; paraphrasing, retelling and summarizing content; recognizing varying text structures; asking and answering questions) ♣
  • 7. Section 2: Vocabulary (Developing a strong vocabulary across content areas; using appropriate vocabulary for defined purposes in specific subject-areas) ♣ Section 3: Sentence mastery (Writing better sentences; varying sentence structures; recognizing parts of speech; playing with language; considering audience, purpose, and message) ♣ Sections 4-7 (Understanding and recognizing two kinds of writing: expository and narrative structures; understanding terminology such as fiction, nonfiction, prose, poetry, explain, and entertain; working with expository/informational texts, stories, personal narratives, and other forms) ♣ Section 9: Specific writing assignments (Array of text forms and genres including persuasive, compare/contrast, cause/effect, poetry, dramatic skit, descriptive, technical writing, and more) Standard/Benchmarks 7: Compare fictional characters and events to real-life experiences. (Example: relating hardships faced by early settlers in literature to hardships faced by families today) Step Up to Writing Reading and writing are interdependent literacy skills. As students improve in one area, they will also see improvement in other areas. In Step Up to Writing, teachers can model various reading and writing strategies and use guided lessons to help students successfully work with texts and writing assignments that challenge their abilities and push them to a higher level. Students are given ample opportunities to independently practice active reading skills and respond to what they read in different formats by drawing connections between the text and themselves, the text and the world around them, and the text and their prior knowledge and experiences. For example: ♣ Section 1: Writing to improve reading and listening comprehension (Making connections between the reading and self/text/world; taking effective notes; making inferences and analyzing the text; paraphrasing, retelling and summarizing content; recognizing varying text structures; asking and answering questions) ♣ Sections 4-7 (Understanding and recognizing two kinds of writing: expository and narrative structures; understanding terminology such as fiction, nonfiction, prose, poetry, explain, and entertain; working with expository/informational texts, stories, personal narratives, and other forms) ♣ Section 9: Specific writing assignments (Array of text forms and genres including persuasive, compare/contrast, cause/effect, poetry, dramatic skit, descriptive, technical writing, and more) Standard/Benchmarks 8: Use text features to guide interpretation of expository texts, including italics, headings, maps, and charts. (Examples: social studies--locating physical features on a map; science--interpreting weather data from charts and tables) In order to meet this standard, students will/are
  • 8. ♣ Interpreting the author's purpose or intent in a given text Step Up to Writing Students are given a variety of active reading strategies to better comprehend all texts, both fiction and non-fiction, written and visual. From recognizing text structures and features to marking and annotating a text, © 2008 Maureen Auman, Read-Write Connection, LLC. All rights reserved. Created for Step Up to Writing trainers, and teachers, school administrators, curriculum coordinators, and leadership teams implementing and using Step Up to Writing. Page 6 of 10 students are equipped with multisensory literacy strategies for analyzing and evaluating texts, making inferences, drawing conclusions and synthesizing information. Teachers are provided with examples to model with their students and guided lessons to incorporate into all subject areas, not just English/language arts. For example: ♣ Section 1: Writing to improve reading and listening comprehension (Various strategies for making connections between the message and the self/other texts/world; taking effective reading and research notes; making inferences and analyzing the text; paraphrasing, retelling and summarizing main ideas and details; asking and answering questions; recognizing text structures; using informal outlines) ♣ Section 2: Vocabulary (Developing a strong vocabulary across content areas) ♣ Sections 4-5 (Recognizing and working with two kinds of writing: expository/informational and narrative; defining fiction, non-fiction, prose, poetry, explain, and entertain; creating informal outlines) ♣ Section 8: Speeches (Asking and answering questions; developing good listening skills; participating in one-on-one and large group discussions) ♣ Section 9: Specific writing assignments (Array of non-fiction and informational forms including persuasive writing; supporting opinion with fact; compare/contrast; cause/effect; technical writing; science reports; writing in math) Grade 3 Writing Standards & Benchmarks Standard/Benchmarks 9: Compose narrative texts using an introductory paragraph, specific time frames, clear sequencing of events, and a conclusion. In order to meet this standard, students will/are ♣ Determining purpose and audience prior to writing (Examples: purpose--writer addresses topic in correct mode; audience--writer uses appropriate tone) ♣ Demonstrating clarity and organization in a composition ♣ Composing descriptive texts using sensory details and vivid language
  • 9. ♣ Composing expository texts using appropriate sequencing of ideas or steps in a process ♣ Using complete sentences, varied sentence structure, and appropriate transition words in a composition ♣ Demonstrating the process of prewriting, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing ♣ Using graphic organizers during prewriting ♣ Using figurative language to enhance written text (Examples: simile, onomatopoeia, metaphor, alliteration) ♣ Utilizing precise vocabulary in written presentations (Examples: gorgeous instead of pretty, prosperous instead of rich) ♣ Demonstrating correct spelling in final written text ♣ Responding in writing to open-ended questions ♣ Utilizing bullets to organize major details and ideas to support a topic ♣ Demonstrating the ability to write legibly in cursive Step Up to Writing Students learn to write for a variety or audiences and purposes; they learn different formats through explicit instruction and guided lessons; they apply and practice a number of writing strategies to various writing assignments across subject areas; they communicate/publish their work using appropriate narrative and expository mediums such as stories, poetry, reports, newspapers, bulletins, web sites, display boards, books. Students perfect writing skills by learning strategies that are visual and broken down into manageable steps. Teachers are encouraged to use content from various subjects to introduce, teach, practice, and apply these strategies; students and teachers are encouraged to apply the strategies in all subject areas; strategies are reinforced by lessons and assignments given by subject area teachers. © 2008 Maureen Auman, Read-Write Connection, LLC. All rights reserved. Created for Step Up to Writing trainers, and teachers, school administrators, curriculum coordinators, and leadership teams implementing and using Step Up to Writing. Page 7 of 10 Students are empowered to develop a repertoire of appropriate writing styles and to complete final drafts that are free of mistakes and follow the established writing conventions. As a result, students develop the ability to edit and proofread their own and others’ writing for usage, punctuation, spelling, syntax, and style. Students are taught to present writing that effectively conveys a message to their audience for a specific purpose. For example:
  • 10. ♣ Section 1: Writing to improve reading and listening comprehension (Learning to summarize; create useable and accurate notes; write and answer questions; respond to text; mastering short responses – writing for clarity and accuracy) ♣ Section 2: Vocabulary (Developing a strong vocabulary across content areas; considering audience, purpose, and message in word choice) ♣ Section 3: Sentence mastery (Writing better sentences; varying sentence structures; recognizing parts of speech; playing with language; considering audience, purpose, and message) ♣ Sections 4 and 5: Expository paragraph, report, and essay writing (Writing for a variety of purposes; writing in first, second, and third person; writing for a specific audience) ♣ Sections 6 and 7: Story and personal narratives (Writing to entertain, to share a message, and/or to create visual images; writing to share an experience) ♣ Section 9: Specific writing assignments (Writing in numerous formats – Examples: writing from a different point of view, writing letters, writing a skit, personal writing, writing to persuade, convince, or inspire, writing to inform, business writing, personal writing) A sampling of writing assignments includes: ♣ Exposition: Sections 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 8, 9, and 10 ♣ Literary analysis: Sections 1, 4, 5, 8, 9, and 10 ♣ Narrative account or procedure: Sections 1, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9, and 10 ♣ Persuasive essay: Sections 4, 5, 8, and 9 ♣ Reflective essay: Sections 1, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9 ♣ Technical/business writing: Sections 4, 5, 8, and 9 ♣ Informative writing: Sections 1, 3, 4, 5, 8, 9, and 10 Standard/Benchmarks 10: Apply mechanics in writing, including capitalization of proper nouns and titles of people and appropriate end marks, abbreviations, and commas with dates. In order to meet this standard, students will/are ♣ Identifying friendly letter parts and related punctuation marks ♣ Using apostrophes with contractions and possessives
  • 11. ♣ Underlining or italicizing book titles ♣ Using commas to separate items in a series, in a physical address, and before the conjunction in a compound sentence Step Up to Writing Students are empowered to develop a repertoire of appropriate writing styles and to complete final drafts that are free of mistakes and follow the established writing conventions. As a result, students develop the ability to edit and proofread their own and others’ writing for usage, punctuation, spelling, syntax, and style. Students are taught to present writing that effectively conveys a message to their audience for a specific purpose. For example: ♣ Section 2: Vocabulary (Developing a strong vocabulary across content areas; considering audience, purpose, and message in word choice) ♣ Section 3: Sentence mastery (Writing better sentences; varying sentence structures; recognizing parts of speech; playing with language; considering audience, purpose, and message) ♣ Sections 4-7 (Writing in 1st, 2nd and 3rd person; planning and organizing for a specific text structure; creating a thesis statement; writing an effective lead; using appropriate transitions; choosing and elaborating on main ideas, reasons, and facts; writing a successful conclusion or ending) © 2008 Maureen Auman, Read-Write Connection, LLC. All rights reserved. Created for Step Up to Writing trainers, and teachers, school administrators, curriculum coordinators, and leadership teams implementing and using Step Up to Writing. Page 8 of 10 ♣ Section 9: Specific writing assignments (Array of writing forms and genres including persuasive, compare/contrast, cause/effect, poetry, dramatic skit, letter writing, and more) ♣ Section 10: Assessment and high standards (Adhering to the “neat paper” rules; printing and cursive writing; editing with CUPS – capitalization, usage, punctuation, and spelling; quick checks for self-evaluation; implementing scoring guides; monitoring student progress) Standard/Benchmarks 11: Recognize nouns, verbs, pronouns, conjunctions, and adjectives in written texts. In order to meet this standard, students will/are ♣ Demonstrating use of nouns, verbs, pronouns, conjunctions, adjectives, and verb tenses in writing ♣ Demonstrating use of subject-verb agreement in writing
  • 12. ♣ Demonstrating use of forms of adjectives in writing Step Up to Writing Students are empowered to develop a repertoire of appropriate writing styles and to complete final drafts that are free of mistakes and follow the established writing conventions. As a result, students develop the ability to edit and proofread their own and others’ writing for usage, punctuation, spelling, syntax, and style. Students are taught to present writing that effectively conveys a message to their audience for a specific purpose. For example: ♣ Section 2: Vocabulary (Developing a strong vocabulary across content areas; considering audience, purpose, and message in word choice) ♣ Section 3: Sentence mastery (Writing better sentences; varying sentence structures; recognizing parts of speech; playing with language; considering audience, purpose, and message) ♣ Sections 4-7 (Writing in 1st, 2nd and 3rd person; planning and organizing for a specific text structure; creating a thesis statement; writing an effective lead; using appropriate transitions; choosing and elaborating on main ideas, reasons, and facts; writing a successful conclusion or ending) ♣ Section 9: Specific writing assignments (Array of writing forms and genres including persuasive, compare/contrast, cause/effect, poetry, dramatic skit, descriptive, and more) ♣ Section 10: Assessment and high standards (Adhering to the “neat paper” rules; printing and cursive writing; editing with CUPS – capitalization, usage, punctuation, and spelling; quick checks for self-evaluation; implementing scoring guides; monitoring student progress) Standard/Benchmarks 12: Demonstrate retrieval skills needed to research a topic. In order to meet this standard, students will/are ♣ Formulating questions based on a topic ♣ Using appropriate reference materials (Examples: dictionaries, atlases, almanacs, thesauruses, technology resources, news and feature articles) ♣ Evaluating relevant information gained through research ♣ Recognizing text features, including italics, captions, sidebars, photographs, and illustrations Step Up to Writing Students learn a number of important skills that prepare them for short and longer research assignments. Students master skills such as taking notes, making outlines, generating questions, and creating thesis statements and topic sentences that make
  • 13. research and writing about research possible. © 2008 Maureen Auman, Read-Write Connection, LLC. All rights reserved. Created for Step Up to Writing trainers, and teachers, school administrators, curriculum coordinators, and leadership teams implementing and using Step Up to Writing. Page 9 of 10 For example: ♣ Section 1: Writing to improve reading and listening comprehension (Taking notes; making inferences and analyzing the text; retelling and summarizing; asking and answering questions; using bookmarks) ♣ Section 4: Information/expository paragraphs (Topic sentences, thesis statements, and leads) ♣ Section 5: Accordion essays and reports (Thesis statements; key supporting statements; elaboration; quotations and documentation) ♣ Section 8: Speeches (Creating a thesis; mastering leads; blocking out support; adding accurate, effective detail and elaboration; adding a conclusion) ♣ Section 9: Specific writing assignments (Array of formal and informal writing forms and genres including writing to persuade or convince; analogies; advertisements; technical writing; writing in math) Grade 3 Speaking & Listening Standards & Benchmarks Standard/Benchmarks 13: Demonstrate the ability to follow multistep oral directions. Step Up to Writing Students need to recognize the interconnectedness of literacy skills and practice strategies for improving their listening, reading, communicating, and viewing skills. Students are taught a variety of active listening and active reading strategies including responding to a text or speaker, taking and organizing notes, making connections to the self/text/world, paraphrasing and summarizing key ideas and opinions, and asking and answering valuable questions. Additionally, students are given an array of activities and opportunities to improve their listening skills and participate in one-on-one and small group discussions. For example: ♣ Section 1: Writing to improve reading and listening comprehension (Strategies for responding to the text; making connections to self/text/world; marking the text; taking effective notes; making inferences; analyzing the text; paraphrasing, retelling and summarizing; asking and answering questions; using bookmarks) ♣ Section 8: Speeches (Improving formal and informal speaking, impromptu speeches, how-to speeches, persuasive speeches, and oral book reports; developing good listening skills; participating in a discussion) ♣
  • 14. Section 10: Assessment and high standards (Using self-evaluation quick checks; participating in the peer review process; recording and monitoring own progress) Standard/Benchmarks 14: Demonstrate eye contact, articulation, and appropriate voice intonation with oral narrative presentations. In order to meet this standard, students will/are ♣ Using dramatizations with oral descriptive presentations ♣ Using figurative language to enhance oral communication (Examples: simile, onomatopoeia, metaphor, alliteration) ♣ Utilizing precise vocabulary in oral presentations (Examples: exceptional instead of good, brilliant instead of smart) Step Up to Writing Students are given the tools for planning, drafting, revising, and communicating their speeches to a variety of audiences. Students learn that oral communication, like written communication, relies on a single thesis statement supported by well-developed main ideas, reasons, details, and facts. Strategies for producing a coherent message – ranging from writing a successful introduction and conclusion to using effective and appropriate transitions, from incorporating interesting anecdotes and stories to accomplishing specific speaking patterns – are offered throughout Step Up to Writing. Teachers are given strategies to help students © 2008 Maureen Auman, Read-Write Connection, LLC. All rights reserved. Created for Step Up to Writing trainers, and teachers, school administrators, curriculum coordinators, and leadership teams implementing and using Step Up to Writing. Page 10 of 10 © 2008 Maureen Auman, Read-Write Connection, LLC. All rights reserved. Created for Step Up to Writing trainers, and teachers, school administrators, curriculum coordinators, and leadership teams implementing and using Step Up to Writing. increase their vocabulary, vary their sentence structures, and develop a strong speaking style; as a result, students become more skillful and confident communicators in a variety of occasions and contexts. For example: ♣ Section 2: Vocabulary (Developing a strong vocabulary across content areas) ♣ Section 3: Sentence mastery (Writing better sentences; varying sentence structures; recognizing parts of speech; playing with language) ♣ Sections 4 – 7 (Planning and organizing; creating a thesis statement; writing an effective lead; using appropriate transitions; choosing and elaborating on main ideas, reasons, and facts; writing a successful conclusion or ending) ♣ Section 8: Speeches (Planning and organizing speeches; giving effective speeches; asking
  • 15. and answering questions; improving impromptu speaking, informational and how-to speeches, and persuasive speeches; focusing on your audience; delivering oral book reports; developing good listening skills; participating in a discussion) ♣ Section 9: Specific writing assignments (Variety of writing/speaking forms including persuasive, compare/contrast, cause/effect, poetry, dramatic skit, personal narrative, and more) ♣ Section 10: Assessment and high standards (Using self-evaluation quick checks for eye contact, articulation and voice in speeches; participating in effective peer review; recording and monitoring own progress) References Auman, Maureen. Step Up to Writing. 3rd ed. Boston: Sopris West Educational Services, 2008. “English Language Arts Standards.” Alabama Leaning Exchange. Alabama Department of Education. 2007. 19 Aug 2008. http://ghucynanindah.blogspot.com/2009/07/2008-maureen-auman-read-write.html