Ancient Toronto before 16th Century - The History of Toronto
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Ancient Toronto before 16th Century - The History of Toronto

on

  • 313 views

Ancient Toronto before 16th Century - The History of Toronto: Toronto has only more than 300 years of development as a city. From primitive men to crude fishing village, then to the arrival of French ...

Ancient Toronto before 16th Century - The History of Toronto: Toronto has only more than 300 years of development as a city. From primitive men to crude fishing village, then to the arrival of French in 17th Century, finally to the biggest city in Canada. Toronto’s developing speed is amazing. Today ResearchVit will introduce you the ancient part of Toronto’s history.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
313
Views on SlideShare
180
Embed Views
133

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0

1 Embed 133

http://www.researchvit.com 133

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Ancient Toronto before 16th Century - The History of Toronto Ancient Toronto before 16th Century - The History of Toronto Presentation Transcript

    • Copyright © 2014 ResearchVit Consulting INC. Confidential and proprietary. Ancient Toronto before 16th Century - The History of Toronto A publication, more researches are available at www.researchvit.com.
    • Copyright © 2014 Consulting INC. Confidential and proprietary. After the Ice Age 2 After the Ice Age Toronto has only more than 300 years of development as a city. From primitive men to crude fishing village, then to the arrival of French in 17th Century, finally to the biggest city in Canada. Toronto’s developing speed is amazing. Today ResearchVit will introduce you the ancient part of Toronto’s history. 13,000 years ago, the one-km-thick glaciers of the last ice age melted northwards from southern Ontario, left behind large meltwater lakes. Geologists call one of those bodies of water ‘Lake Iroquois‘, which is much larger than Lake Ontario - Its water level was 40 metres higher than today's lake, which means the current downtown Toronto was once underwater. Around 11,700 years ago, Lake Iroquois found St Lawrence as a new outlet to the Atlantic Ocean. That caused the lake to drain 100 metres below today's Lake Ontario 11,400 years ago, and makes its shoreline far to the south of the current one.
    • Copyright © 2014 Consulting INC. Confidential and proprietary. Ancient Toronto 3 Ancient Toronto Around 10,500-11,000 years ago, a small number of people moved into the cold sub-arctic landscape of ancient Ontario from the south. The shoreline of ancient Lake Ontario lying about 20 kms south of modern Toronto. These early inhabitants fished and gathered but relied mainly on hunting caribou, as well as mammoths, mastodons, and smaller animals in a region of tundra and boreal forest. They travelled across large distances in families to sustain themselves.
    • Copyright © 2014 Consulting INC. Confidential and proprietary. Evolving Societies 4 Evolving Societies (BC 6,000 – AD 600) About 8,000 years ago, the climate warmed to similar to modern levels, new plants evolved in southern Ontario. Indigenous people discovered a convenient shortcut between Lake Ontario in the south and Georgian Bay in the north. Later known as the ‘Toronto Passage’, the main branches of this route expands to a large area. People expanded the range of foodstuffs as the climate and environment evolved, with fishing in particular growing in importance. Over the millennia, these indigenous societies grew in complexity. Related families began to congregate in large spring and summer camps near the mouths of rivers to catch fish, trade, and engage in communal social and spiritual events around 3,000 years ago. The population also rose through the centuries, to roughly 10,000 in southern Ontario by about 1,500 years ago, with possibly 500 people living along each of the major rivers in the Toronto area. There are similarities in many of the excavated sites across the lower Great Lakes and by the presence of trade goods from far away, such as copper mined near Lake Superior and marine shell objects from today's southern United States. ↓Axe/Arrow heads(BC 1,000)
    • Copyright © 2014 Consulting INC. Confidential and proprietary. Iroquoian Cultures 5 Iroquoian Cultures (AD 600 – 1600) Beans, squash, sunflowers, and tobacco were introduced into Ontario from the south. As an important new corps, corn arrived roughly 1,400 years ago, became increasingly important in people's diets. The move towards farming helped shaping the horticultural Iroquoian societies that developed about 1,100 years ago in the lower Great Lakes. ↑Ceramic Pot and Bird Effigy (AD 1,300) Iroquoian Pipe (AD 1,500) → An important shift showed that people slowly abandoned much of the mobility. In its place semi-permanent villages developed, people moved out during parts of the year to hunt, fish, gather, or otherwise meet their subsistence needs as supplements to the farming that lay at the heart of their work. Iroquoian villages typically lasted from 10 to 20 years before their inhabitants relocated to new sites when the longhouses deteriorated. The old settlements served as meadowlands and thinly forested environments.
    • Copyright © 2014 Consulting INC. Confidential and proprietary. European Goods 6 European Goods (16th Century) In 1534, the French sailor Jacques Cartier journeyed up the St Lawrence River as far as modern Montreal. Cartier's journey was the first well-documented record of European activity on the edge of the Great Lakes region. However, his memoirs clearly indicated that the aboriginal people he met on the St Lawrence had encountered whites previously, had traded furs for foreign goods, and had stored pelts in anticipation of future contacts. In 14th to 16th centuries, the Iroquoians in Toronto and surrounding areas slowly moved north to the Georgian Bay to join the developing Huron confederacy. The new Huron confederacy used the now-uninhabited Toronto as part of their territory. ↑Native territories in 1600 Please keep an eye in Modern Toronto after 16th Century next week.
    • Copyright © 2014 Consulting INC. Confidential and proprietary. Who is ResearchVit? 7 Who do we focus? What’s our core value? Who are we? Who have we served? Marketing Research and Consulting Headquartered in Toronto, Canada Provide Quantitative and Qualitative marketing research and consulting services Study North American consumers Special capacity to study consumers with Chinese origin in North America Research power behind smart brands We grow with your grow Your cost-effective research partner ……
    • Copyright © 2014 ResearchVit Consulting Inc. Confidential and proprietary. www.researchvit.com www.researchvit.ca info@researchvit.com @屠克 @researchvit pinterest.com/researchvit linkedin.com/company/researchvit slideshare.net/researchvit Research Reference: 1. “First Peoples, 9000 BCE to 1600 CE”, City of Toronto; 2. “History of Toronto”, Lonely Planet; 3. “Images From Our Archives”, Toronto Historical Association; 4. “History of Toronto”, Wikipedia. facebook.com/pages/ResearchVit/4 95766670485350?ref=ts&fref=ts