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Global Research Alliance for Agricultural Greenhouse Gasses
Global Research Alliance for Agricultural Greenhouse Gasses
Global Research Alliance for Agricultural Greenhouse Gasses
Global Research Alliance for Agricultural Greenhouse Gasses
Global Research Alliance for Agricultural Greenhouse Gasses
Global Research Alliance for Agricultural Greenhouse Gasses
Global Research Alliance for Agricultural Greenhouse Gasses
Global Research Alliance for Agricultural Greenhouse Gasses
Global Research Alliance for Agricultural Greenhouse Gasses
Global Research Alliance for Agricultural Greenhouse Gasses
Global Research Alliance for Agricultural Greenhouse Gasses
Global Research Alliance for Agricultural Greenhouse Gasses
Global Research Alliance for Agricultural Greenhouse Gasses
Global Research Alliance for Agricultural Greenhouse Gasses
Global Research Alliance for Agricultural Greenhouse Gasses
Global Research Alliance for Agricultural Greenhouse Gasses
Global Research Alliance for Agricultural Greenhouse Gasses
Global Research Alliance for Agricultural Greenhouse Gasses
Global Research Alliance for Agricultural Greenhouse Gasses
Global Research Alliance for Agricultural Greenhouse Gasses
Global Research Alliance for Agricultural Greenhouse Gasses
Global Research Alliance for Agricultural Greenhouse Gasses
Global Research Alliance for Agricultural Greenhouse Gasses
Global Research Alliance for Agricultural Greenhouse Gasses
Global Research Alliance for Agricultural Greenhouse Gasses
Global Research Alliance for Agricultural Greenhouse Gasses
Global Research Alliance for Agricultural Greenhouse Gasses
Global Research Alliance for Agricultural Greenhouse Gasses
Global Research Alliance for Agricultural Greenhouse Gasses
Global Research Alliance for Agricultural Greenhouse Gasses
Global Research Alliance for Agricultural Greenhouse Gasses
Global Research Alliance for Agricultural Greenhouse Gasses
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Global Research Alliance for Agricultural Greenhouse Gasses

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“Global Research Alliance for Agricultural Greenhouse Gasses”, presented by Steve Shafer, USDA at the ReSAKSS-Asia Conference, Nov 14-16, 2011, in Kathmandu, Nepal.

“Global Research Alliance for Agricultural Greenhouse Gasses”, presented by Steve Shafer, USDA at the ReSAKSS-Asia Conference, Nov 14-16, 2011, in Kathmandu, Nepal.

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  • 1. Enhancing cooperation inEnhancing cooperation in agricultural greenhouse gas research Steven ShaferSteven Shafer US Dept. of Agriculture Agricultural Research Serviceg
  • 2. Thank you to the Alliance’s group coordinators forg p contributing to this presentation.
  • 3. The Global Research Alliance onThe Global Research Alliance on Agricultural Greenhouse Gases • Proposed in 2009 by New Zealand • Development in partnership with the United States and others • 21 countries at COP15 in Copenhagen endorsed a JointCopenhagen endorsed a Joint Ministerial Statement on the Establishment of a Global Research Alliance on Agricultural GreenhouseAlliance on Agricultural Greenhouse Gases 3
  • 4. Alliance Members Website List 7 November 2011 • Argentina A t li • Japan M l i• Australia • Brazil • Canada • Chile • Malaysia • Mexico • Netherlands • New Zealand • China • Colombia • Costa Rica • Denmark • Norway • Peru • Philippines • Republic of Korea• Denmark • Finland • France • Germany • Republic of Korea • Spain • Sweden • Switzerland • Ghana • Indonesia • Ireland • Italy • United Kingdom • United States • Uruguay • Vietnam• Italy • Vietnam 4
  • 5. The Global Research Alliance on Agricultural Greenhouse Gaseson Agricultural Greenhouse Gases in brief •• Understand GHG emissions from agricultureUnderstand GHG emissions from agriculture •• Improve measurement and estimation of GHGImprove measurement and estimation of GHG emissions and C sequestrationemissions and C sequestration •• Understand GHG emissions from agricultureUnderstand GHG emissions from agriculture •• Improve measurement and estimation of GHGImprove measurement and estimation of GHG emissions and C sequestrationemissions and C sequestrationemissions and C sequestrationemissions and C sequestration •• Develop ways to reduce emissionsDevelop ways to reduce emissions •• Develop ways to increase C sequestrationDevelop ways to increase C sequestration emissions and C sequestrationemissions and C sequestration •• Develop ways to reduce emissionsDevelop ways to reduce emissions •• Develop ways to increase C sequestrationDevelop ways to increase C sequestrationp y qp y q •• Mitigate GHGs while sustaining or enhancingMitigate GHGs while sustaining or enhancing productivity and resilience as climate changesproductivity and resilience as climate changes p y qp y q •• Mitigate GHGs while sustaining or enhancingMitigate GHGs while sustaining or enhancing productivity and resilience as climate changesproductivity and resilience as climate changes •• Transfer new knowledge and technology toTransfer new knowledge and technology to farmers/land managers worldwidefarmers/land managers worldwide •• Build scientific capacity in developing countries viaBuild scientific capacity in developing countries via •• Transfer new knowledge and technology toTransfer new knowledge and technology to farmers/land managers worldwidefarmers/land managers worldwide •• Build scientific capacity in developing countries viaBuild scientific capacity in developing countries via•• Build scientific capacity in developing countries viaBuild scientific capacity in developing countries via partnershipspartnerships •• Build scientific capacity in developing countries viaBuild scientific capacity in developing countries via partnershipspartnerships 5
  • 6. Country Participation • Based on interest, resources capacity a t c pat o resources, capacity • Encourage and seek opportunities for expanded funding of research, technology transfer • Scientific exchanges and• Scientific exchanges and partnerships to leverage resources, expertise 6
  • 7. Our Collective Vision • Increase agriculture production with lower emissions Feeding the world within the carrying capacity of earth • Improve global cooperation in research & technology Accelerate/strengthen knowledge and technologyAccelerate/strengthen knowledge and technology development that would not happen without the Alliance • Work with farmers and partners provide knowledge• Work with farmers and partners, provide knowledge Develop relevant mitigation options and strengthen productivity and resilience of food systems
  • 8. Cross-cutting Groups Concerted Actions Livestock Research Groupp nd ing Croplands Research Groupbonan nCycli yand ement Paddy Rice Research Group ilCarb rogen entory asure Soi Nitr Inv Mea
  • 9. Ki k ff i W lli t A il 2010 The Journey So Far • Kick-off in Wellington April 2010 • Extensive concerted stock take • 1st Group meetings September – November 2010 • 2nd Group meetings March 2011 (France) • Charter signed, Council’s first meeting – June 2011 (Rome) C il d f t ti b tCouncil composed of one representative per member country. Council provides leadership, broad policy development for the scientific groups Council makes decisions by consensus • Other group meetings, workshops Stock Take Ambition & Vi i Action Plan Vision
  • 10. http://www.future-science.com/doi/pdf/10.4155/cmt.11.26
  • 11. Secretariat hosted by New Zealand • Coordination amongg the groups, Council • Internal and external communications • Logistics and support for meetingsg • Coordination for policy development, membership,p, partnerships • Alliance website www.globalresearchalliance.org
  • 12. Livestock Research Group Coordinated by the Netherlands and New Zealand • Livestock is key agricultural sector in all regions with GHG emissions arise from animals, manure, and soils Stocktake shows more than 40% of all current research is in livestock; two thirds funded by governments • Almost all Alliance members participate is in livestock; two thirds funded by governments • Two subgroups: Ruminants (rumen and soils) Non Ruminants (manure) AR1
  • 13. Slide 12 AR1 check with Laura Andy Reisinger, 6/9/2011
  • 14. Paddy Rice Group • Rice is staple food for > 2 billion people • Paddy rice cultivation systems have different GHG i i th th i temissions than other cropping systems • 18 countries are members of the paddy rice group • Coordinated by Japan and Uruguay • Stocktake shows currently 64 research projects d i 16 diff t t iunderway in 16 different countries − Two major topics: GHG accounting/LCA and agronomy − Two primary outcomes: mitigation and inventory
  • 15. Croplands Group • Coordinated by the United States • Action Plan components Management and net GHG emissions:Management and net GHG emissions: France, United States Emission of GHGs in agricultural peatlands and wetlands: NNorway Models for C and N emissions: France • Focus areas Establish scientific teams; develop literature database; standardize protocols; initiate collaborative research
  • 16. Inventories and Measurement C C tti GCross-Cutting Group (CANADA / NETHERLANDS ) Concentrate on addressing issues that affect and benefit more than one Research Group Complement and support the Research Groups• Complement and support the Research Groups • Further consistent methodological approaches Information, knowledge, and data sharingInformation, knowledge, and data sharing • Inventory methods, common priorities for collaboration • Improve quantification of emissions and mitigation actions W k h N b 8 10 2011 i C d• Workshop November 8-10, 2011 in Canada Guidelines for measurements • Improve comparability coherence quality verifiability• Improve comparability, coherence, quality, verifiability
  • 17. Soil Carbon-Nitrogen Cycles Cross C tting Gro pCross-Cutting Group (FRANCE / AUSTRALIA ) Improved methodologies and models for mitigation • Define common objectives across Research Groups • Build a common modelling platform from multiple models • Build collective expertise on applicability of models, uncertainty and range of mitigation optionsy g g p Workshops and activities to advance these goals: • First workshop (Orléans, March 3, 2011):p ( ) stock-take of C-N models and datasets • Second workshop (Leuven, July 2011): model-data intercomparison including hands-on trainingmodel data intercomparison, including hands on training
  • 18. Croplands – Goals & Benefits R h th t t• Benefits Reduced GHG emission intensity from croplands while sustaining or increasing yields through widely available R h th t Research that supports decision-making sustaining or increasing yields, through widely available decision-support tools • Key near- and medium-term outcomes Research that predicts Research that l iAction plan to guide projects; assessment of GHG emissions from different management systems; predictive capability of GHG emissions and soil carbon sequestration explains • Critical success factors Broad participation by scientists in member countries, including academic, private-sector, and other non-government partnersacademic, private sector, and other non government partners
  • 19. P Sh t T G l fProgress on Short-Term Goals for the Croplands Groupp p Develop a library website (US, Australia) in progress in cooperation with Kansas State University in the USState University in the US Develop researcher contact list from Stocktake (US) in progress I d il f h S k kIncrease detail from the Stocktake to support specific partnerships (all) Develop an inventory of important l id li h d f il Cprotocols, guidelines, methods for soil C, GHG flux in crops (US, NZ, Canada) – early version completed and distributed
  • 20. Progress on Longer-Term Goals for the Croplands Group Develop a searchable database – in progress Initiate project development – Action Plan completed, countries’ implementation proposals distributed Identify funding opportunities – ongoing Increase use of GRA website for communications - ongoing Propose topics for Cross-Cutting team –p p g part of Action Plan Component 3 Catalog best mitigation options and recommendations in each country – not initiated yet.
  • 21. Croplands Research Group A i Pl D l dAction Plan Development and Implementation Component 1: Quantifying Net Greenhouse Gas Emissions in CroplandEmissions in Cropland Management Systems Component 2: Assessing Greenhouse Gas Emissions in Agricultural Peatlands and WetlandsWetlands Component 3: Modeling C and N Emissions
  • 22. Croplands Research GroupCroplands Research Group Action Plan Implementation Component 1: Quantifying Net Greenhouse Gas Emissions in Cropland Management Systems Anticipated products, interests Standardized protocols & methods for determining GHG emissions and C sequestration International database on agricultural management influences on GHG fluxes, C sequestration Guidelines and practices for minimizing GHG emissions and CGuidelines and practices for minimizing GHG emissions and C sequestration in different soils, environments, cropping systems Emissions factors for specific countries Database of long-term experimental sitesDatabase of long-term experimental sites Summary documents for decision makers
  • 23. Croplands Research Group Action Plan Implementation Component 2: Assessing GHG Emissions in Agricultural Peatlands and Wetlands Action Plan Implementation Agricultural Peatlands and Wetlands Anticpated products, interests Global network of experimental sitesp Overview reports on this topic Publications/reports on management practices and their ff i i i heffects on GHG emissions in these systems GHG datasets for models, management testing Recommendations to ways to restore peatlands to a state ofRecommendations to ways to restore peatlands to a state of more naturally occurring ecosystem functioning
  • 24. Croplands Research Group Component 3: Modeling C and N Emissions Action Plan Implementation Component 3: Modeling C and N Emissions Anticpated products, interests List of publications using N2O models soil organic CList of publications using N2O models, soil organic C models Review articles describing N2O, organic C models Bibliometric analysis of worldwide scientific literature and map of research groups M d l l ti th i f th b t d l b tModel evaluation, synthesis of the best models, best conditions for each List of models using a mass balance approach for C and Ng pp cycling in the same model framework
  • 25. Example of an international researchExample of an international research partnership project under the Alliance’spartnership project under the Alliance’spartnership project under the Alliance spartnership project under the Alliance s Croplands Research GroupCroplands Research Group GGreenhouse gasreenhouse gas RReduction througheduction through AAgriculturalgricultural CCarbonarbon EEnhancement network:nhancement network: GRACEnetGRACEnet June 2011 October 2011 Coming 2012
  • 26. GGreenhouse gasreenhouse gas RReduction througheduction through AAgriculturalgricultural CC bb EE h t t kh t t k GRACE tGRACE tCCarbonarbon EEnhancement network:nhancement network: GRACEnetGRACEnet USDA ARS GRACEnet Units • Evaluate soil C status & change in existing typical and alternative agricultural systems • Determine net GHG emission (CO2, CH4 and N2O) of existing and alternative agricultural systems • Determine environmental effects (water, air and soil quality) of new agricultural systems developed to reduce GHG emission and increase soil C storagee ss o a d c ease so C s o age 34 Location-coordinated ARS effort • Core project plan • Individual scientist project plans • Peer reviewsPeer reviews
  • 27. GRACEnetGRACEnet i i•Experiment Scenarios •Business as usual (current management practices) •Maximizing C sequestration rate Mi i i i t GHG i i i l di N O d CH i i•Minimizing net GHG emission including N2O and CH4 emissions •Maximizing environmental benefits •Common sampling guidelines•Common sampling guidelines •Instrumentation development •GRACEnet database •Model development, validation, applications
  • 28. GRACEnet DatabaseGRACEnet Database
  • 29. GRACEnetGRACEnet • Products** •• National GHG flux & C storage databaseNational GHG flux & C storage database S & th i f ti i d liS & th i f ti i d li•• Summary & synthesis papers for action agencies and policySummary & synthesis papers for action agencies and policy makersmakers •• Regional & national guidelines for management practicesRegional & national guidelines for management practices •• Development & evaluation of computer modelsDevelopment & evaluation of computer modelsDevelopment & evaluation of computer modelsDevelopment & evaluation of computer models •• FutureFuture •• Increased NIncreased N22O emphasisO emphasisIncreased NIncreased N22O emphasisO emphasis •• Specialty crops (vegetables, fruits, nuts, horticulture, etc.)Specialty crops (vegetables, fruits, nuts, horticulture, etc.) •• Animal systems including increased pasture and rangeAnimal systems including increased pasture and range •• Decision support & mitigation optionsDecision support & mitigation optionspp g ppp g p •• Domestic and international collaborationsDomestic and international collaborations **More than 200 refereed journal articles, books, b k h t di f fbook chapters, proceedings papers as of from 01/2005 to 10/2011 http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/GRACEnet
  • 30. Some recent meetings Livestock Research Group: Amsterdam, The Netherlands 5 6 N b 2011 Croplands Research Group: San Antonio, TX, USA 20 October 2011 5-6 November 2011 6th Int. Symposium on Non-CO2 Greenhouse Gases Annual Soil Science Society Int. Meetings Soil C/N Cycling Cross-Cutting Group: Leuven, Belgium 13 14 J l 201113-14 July 2011 Int. Symposium on Soil Organic Matter Paddy Rice Research Group: Tsukuba, Japan 18 November 2011
  • 31. Benefits of the Alliance Identify information and technology needs, which vary among countries. C di t d l hCoordinate and leverage scarce research resources. Highlight the need for increased i t t i iti ti hinvestment in mitigation research. Research capacity building in developing countries. Information and technology transfer. International public-private partnerships.

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