Biotechnology’s Contributions to Increased Philippine Food Security

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“Biotechnology’s Contributions to Increased Philippine Food Security”, presented by Randy Hautea, Global Coordinator, ISAAA at the ReSAKSS-Asia Conference, Nov 14-16, 2011, in Kathmandu, Nepal.

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Biotechnology’s Contributions to Increased Philippine Food Security

  1. 1. Crop Biotechnology in the Philippines – Potent Tool to Help Improve Food Security Randy A. Hautea, ISAAA November 15, 2011 Kathmandu, Nepal
  2. 2. Global hunger declining but still unacceptably high, FAO 2011 A Food Insecure World
  3. 3. Food Insecurity in the Philippines
  4. 4. Dimensions of Food Security Food Availability Access Stability Slide: Adapted from Tan Siang Hee, 2011 Utilization
  5. 5. Greenhouse Gas Emissions 17.7 b Kg less CO2 in 2009 Equal to removing 7.8 m cars for a year Pesticide Reduction 393 m Kg (-8.7%) reduction since 2009 Economic Return $ 10.8 B net farmer income in 2009 $ 64.7 B net farmer income 1996-2009 Productivity 83.5 M MT Soy, 130.5 M MT Corn (2006-2010) GLOBAL BENEFITS ECONOMIC AND ENVIRONMENTAL Sustainable, profitable and productive agriculture continues to be boosted by the contribution of biotech crops. G. Brooks, 13 April 2011 Slide: Tan Siang Hee, 2011)
  6. 6. Biotechnology: Priority Field for Country’s Development • Agriculture • Environment • Alternative Energy • Health and Health Products
  7. 7. Philippine Biotechnology Policy Initiatives/Support • 1979- President Ferdinand Marcos. Creation of the National Institutes of Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology at the University of the Philippines Los Banos- Became the National Institute of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology • 1990- President Corazon Aquino. Executive Order No. 430- Establishment of the National Committee on Biosafety of the Philippines • 1996- President Fidel Ramos. National Agricultural Biotechnology Program and Agriculture and Fisheries Modernization Act
  8. 8. Philippine Biotechnology Policy Initiatives/Support • 2000- President Joseph Estrada. National Policy Statement of Support for Agricultural Biotechnology • 2001- President Gloria Arroyo. National Policy on the Safe and Responsible Use of Biotechnology. • 2006- President Gloria Arroyo. Executive Order No. 514- National Biosafety Framework
  9. 9. Biosafety Regulatory Framework • The National Committee on Biosafety of the Philippines (October 15, 1990) - created thru Executive Order No. 430. NCBP formulates, reviews and amends national policy on biosafety and formulate guidelines on the conduct of activities on genetic engineering. • Department of Agriculture Administrative Order No. 8 (2002) - Basis for the commercial release of biotech crops. • Executive Order 514 (March 17, 2006) - issued to further strengthen the NCBP and establish the National Biosafety Framework.
  10. 10. Strengthening National Capacity on Biotechnology • Capacity building for regulatory and scientific bodies • Extensive multi-media and multi- stakeholder outreach and communications – farming groups, national and local government agencies, policymakers, consumers, general public, media, scientific community, food industry, students, others • Capacity building for communicating biotechnology – risk communication, information resource centers • Network and coalition building
  11. 11. Philippine Crop Biotechnology • 1st country in SEAsia to establish a regulatory system for GM/biotech crops • The sole country in SEAsia currently commercializing GM/biotech crops • The only Asian country allowing for propagation of biotech feed/food crop • 1st country in SEAsia to be included in the top 15 biotech mega-countries • National biosafety policy considered as model framework to other countries
  12. 12. GM/Biotech Events Approved in the Philippines (BPI, 2011) • Single Trait for Propagation – Mon 810 - 2002/2007 – NK 603 – 2005/2010 – Bt 11 – 2005/2010 – GA 21 – 2009 – Mon 89034 – 2010 • Combined trait products for corn propagation – Mon 810 x NK 603 – 2005/2010 – Bt 11 x GA 21 – 2010 – Mon 89034 x NK603 - 2011 • For direct food, feed use and processing – >50 Approvals for crops such as alfalfa, corn, cotton, sugar beet, potato, soybean and squash Source: www.biotech.da.gov.ph
  13. 13. Biotech corn adoption in Philippine Island groups (2003-2010, BPI) 0 100,000 200,000 300,000 400,000 500,000 600,000 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Mindanao Visayas Luzon
  14. 14. Biotech corn adoption in the Philippines, by trait (2003-2010, BPI) 0 100000 200000 300000 400000 500000 600000 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Stacked Ht Bt
  15. 15. Corn Production in the Philippines 2000-2009 - 1,000,000 2,000,000 3,000,000 4,000,000 5,000,000 6,000,000 7,000,000 8,000,000 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Year hectares|metrictons - 0.500 1.000 1.500 2.000 2.500 3.000 Yield(tonsperhectare) Area (hectares) Total Production (metric tons) Yield (ton per hectare) Biotech Corn Adoption Source: BAS, DA, 2010; compiled by ISAAA
  16. 16. Realizing Benefits in Farmers’ Field Estimated number of biotech corn farmers in the Philippines, 2006-2009. (James, 2006-2010) 100,000 125,000 175,000 250,000 270,000 0 50,000 100,000 150,000 200,000 250,000 300,000 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010
  17. 17. Lower production costs • 60 percent reduction in pesticide use (Yorobe and Quicoy, 2006) • Lower labor costs associated with weeding and spraying Higher yields harvested • Projected to have a yield advantage of up to 41 percent over non-Bt corn (Gonzales, 2002, as cited by Yorobe and Quicoy, 2006) • Bt corn has 34 percent more harvests than non-Bt (Yorobe and Quicoy, 2006) Safer environment • No negative effect on insect population in Bt corn fields (Reyes, 2004) • Increase in the population of beneficial insects (i.e. beetles, spiders, ladybugs) (Javier et al., 2004, as cited by James, 2009) Crop Biotech Benefits to the Philippines
  18. 18. Additional profit/Income advantages per hectare from Bt maize adoption, based on various studies Authors Additional profit/Income advantage Gonzales, 2005, as cited by James, 2008 Dry season: Php 7,482 or $135 Wet season: Php 7,080 or $125 Yorobe and Quicoy, 2006 Php 10,132 or about $218 Gonzales, 2007 Income advantage during dry season: 20-48% Income advantage during wet season: 5-14% Gonzales, 2009 Income advantage during dry season: 1-75% Income advantage during wet season: 3-75% Crop Biotech Benefits to the Philippines
  19. 19. Farm level aggregate economic benefits of planting biotech maize • US $ 108 Million (2003-2009) (Brooks and Barfoot, 2011) Net National Impact of biotech maize on farm income • US$ 35 Million (2009) (Brooks and Barfoot, 2011) Crop Biotech Benefits to the Philippines
  20. 20. Most Advanced Public Sector Biotech R&D Non-Bt Bt Non-Bt Bt Insect resistant eggplant- multi-location field trial Pro-vitamin A enriched rice – confined field trial Potential Impacts: >Increase yields >Reduce pesticide use and production cost >Increase farmers’ income >Positive impact to farmer’s health and environment
  21. 21. Most Advanced Public Sector Biotech R&D Virus resistant, delayed ripening papaya – contained trial Virus resistant sweet potato – contained trial Insect resistant cotton - contained trial
  22. 22. In Summary, Crop Biotech Benefits to the Philippines • Economic Benefits – productivity, farm income, production efficiency • Environmental Benefits – pesticide reduction, farm ecology • Social Benefits – poverty alleviation, other social welfare benefits • Trade in agricultural products – especially for key imports Contributing to Increased Food Security

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