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A Common M&E Framework for CAADP_2009
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A Common M&E Framework for CAADP_2009

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"A Common M&E Framework for CAADP" presentation by Sam Benin at the NEPAD, IFPRI, AGRA and World Bank Meeting to Align Efforts on Agricultural Policy and Knowledge Systems, Dakar, Senegal, January …

"A Common M&E Framework for CAADP" presentation by Sam Benin at the NEPAD, IFPRI, AGRA and World Bank Meeting to Align Efforts on Agricultural Policy and Knowledge Systems, Dakar, Senegal, January 6-7, 2009.

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  • 1. A Common M&E Framework for CAADP by ReSAKSS in collaboration with the AU and NEPAD NEPAD, IFPRI, AGRA, and World Bank Meeting onAligning Efforts on Agricultural Policy and Knowledge Systems in Support of CAADP January 6-7, 2009 Dakar, Senegal Regional Strategic Analysis and Knowledge Support System – Africa Wide
  • 2. The Challenge• At 2nd CAADP Partnership Platform (PP) meeting, September 27-28, 2007, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia – Need common M&E Framework for implementation at the national, regional and continental levels – Identify benchmarks/indicators capable of measuring progress towards achieving CAADP goals and targets at all levels – Crosscutting issues such as gender, sustainability, HIV/AIDS and other critical factors should be included – Common benchmarks, indicators, reporting formats, and timelines established by next PP Meeting – The AU and NEPAD should work with ReSAKSS to develop the frameworkRegional Strategic Analysis and Knowledge Support System – Africa Wide Page 2
  • 3. Achievements to date• CAADP M&E working group established, beginning with a workshop at the AU (Addis Ababa, Dec 3-4, 2007)• M&E framework developed and presented at CAADP PP meeting in Seychelles, March 2008 (www.resakss.org/publications/DiscussionP6.pdf)• Based on recommended indicators, developing formats (mostly one-page surveys) for data collection: – Agricultural policies, strategies and institutions – CAADP implementation process – Total and agricultural expenditures – Agricultural performance indicators – Macro- and socio-economic performance indicatorsRegional Strategic Analysis and Knowledge Support System – Africa Wide Page 3
  • 4. Rationale for common M&E framework• Assess impact more broadly: whether and how investments and policies associated with CAADP are having desired growth and poverty-reduction impacts more than sum of pillars: individual pillar M&E frameworks focus on specific targets without considering how they interact with those of other pillars (e.g. through price effects, complementarity of investments) to affect overall CAADP goals and objectives• Tell a compelling story about progress and performance with CAADP implementation for: progress review at country level; peer review at regional level; and mutual review at continent wide level selected indicators should be standardized and consistent across different countries and regions (and measurable at all the three levels) for comparisons and cross-country learningRegional Strategic Analysis and Knowledge Support System – Africa Wide Page 4
  • 5. What to monitor and evaluate? some guiding principles• Selected indicators must be considered within at least two broad dimensions of impact assessment: – Outcome of interest – Attribution• In addition to outcome variables of interest, need to monitor other factors likely to influence realization of the outcomes – Sound theoretical framework of causality (inputs outputs outcomes) is needed• Remain simple enough to be practical – Over-engineering an M&E system will likely not only be a wasted effort but can eventually undermine the M&E system – Simply believing that an M&E system has inherent value is a typical mistake. The information in the system is only valuable if it is used – An M&E system is as good as the data underlying itRegional Strategic Analysis and Knowledge Support System – Africa Wide Page 5
  • 6. Types of indicators to be monitored • Input indicators. What is the overall level of effort invested? – Processes, policies, strategies, institutions, expenditures, etc. • Output indicators. What is the level of provision, utilization and coverage of investment programs? – Access to infrastructure/services, adoption of technologies, etc. • Outcome indicators. What is the effect on assets and activities that affect goals? – Yields, production, trade, prices/wages, etc. • Impact indicators. What was the ultimate impact on higher-level goals? – Growth, income, poverty, food security, hunger, etc. • Conditioning indicators. How confident are we that any observed effect is due to the intervention? – Resources, rainfall, prices/wages, employment, policies, etc.Regional Strategic Analysis and Knowledge Support System – Africa Wide Page 6
  • 7. Level of M&E analyses• Trend and situation analyses to monitor annually at country, regional and continental levels (no attribution) – Progress towards achieving main CCADP targets: • 10 percent government agricultural expenditure • 6 percent agricultural growth • Halving poverty – Progress in other agricultural and macro- and socio- economic performance indicators• Impact analysis using case study approach (e.g. for select countries and/or programs) (www.resakss.org/publications/DiscussionP7.pdf)Regional Strategic Analysis and Knowledge Support System – Africa Wide Page 7
  • 8. Key questions for impact analysis• How effective have different types of policies and investments been in the achievements realized so far?• What factors have shaped the level of impact that has been achieved?• What are the trade-offs and complementarities, if any, among different types of policies and investments?• What are the projected impacts if policies and investments proceed as currently planned?• Are these projected impacts compatible with the growth and poverty- and hunger-reduction goals?• Could greater or better distributed outcomes and impacts be obtained by reconfiguring the policies and investment portfolio?• What are the different policies and types of investments that can lead to greater and more sustainable growth as well as greater and better distributed outcomes and impacts?Regional Strategic Analysis and Knowledge Support System – Africa Wide Page 8
  • 9. Some operational challenges• Getting hold of the data – Requires sufficient detail on projects and services by all sources across all four pillars of the CAADP• Promotion and endorsement of standardized and harmonized set of core indicators across countries – Countries have varying degrees of availability, quality, quantity, frequency and measurement of data, as well as analytical capacities – Requires the development of a standardized protocol for data collection, measurement and reporting, which will depend on how countries follow through in adhering to the demands for improve data systems and reporting• How to maintain the M&E System as useful, practical and timely in the long runRegional Strategic Analysis and Knowledge Support System – Africa Wide Page 9
  • 10. Roles and responsibilities for operationalization of the M&E system• Data collection at country level must be with the country itself (i.e. CAADP Focal Point will be key). The ReSAKSS nodes will help facilitate it• Given the challenges with data requirements and availability, it makes sense for a phased-in approach. – Short term (first year): ReSAKSS nodes already tapping into network of data providers at the country level (select countries only) – Medium term (second to third year): build on above when sufficient resources are made available to include other countries – Long term (post second and third years): commitment and process put in place by RECs and countries to internalize it within their own systems. This must be tied with serious efforts to improve national data and M&E systems in generalRegional Strategic Analysis and Knowledge Support System – Africa Wide Page 10
  • 11. Dissemination and reporting• ReSAKSS annual trends and situation analysis of the agricultural sector. Full report and briefs to be completed by end of September of each year―timely for CAADP PP meeting• ReSAKSS website (www.resakss.org) to view and download trends, data, charts, supporting research publications, etc.• Various other media and presentations to review information and results of analyses: – CAADP PP (Africa wide) – CAADP advisory councils at REC level – ReSAKSS steering committee meetings (REC level) – Other regional and country level policy dialogue gatheringsRegional Strategic Analysis and Knowledge Support System – Africa Wide Page 11
  • 12. Regional Strategic Analysis and Knowledge Support System – Africa Wide Page 12
  • 13. Next steps• Finalize data collection formats/surveys – linked with finalizing set of core indicators and depth of analyses to be undertaken• Resources to be allocated for collection of the data• Establish contacts (and contracts) with key institutions (or individuals within those institutions) to begin collection of the data• Set up data entry format and database to be linked to the website• Use data in trends and impact analysesRegional Strategic Analysis and Knowledge Support System – Africa Wide Page 13
  • 14. Thank YouRegional Strategic Analysis and Knowledge Support System – Africa Wide
  • 15. Indicator levelLogical conditioning factorsframework of Hunger GoalsCAADP Household assets and Poverty Goals endowments Natural disasters Conflict Intermed. Goals Income Non-agricultural production Employment Intermed Rural wages Prices Inflation Goals Outcomes Resources Sus. Land Ag Prod & Food Ag Trade Rainfall, natural disasters Mg’t Supply Outcomes Trade policies Exchange rate Prices Outputs Physical Capital in: Human Capital Initial conditions of capital Irrigation systems Social services (education, Rural roads health, social security) Information, Marketing Knowledge, and Outputs Food reserves Technologies 1 2 3 4 Inputs Political economy Land Mg’t & Infras & Governance Food Sec & Ag Res & Water Control Trade-Rel Institutions Safety Nets Tech Dev’t Sys. Mk’t Access Inputs Total government revenue Private-sector investments/FDI Capacity Strengthening ODA (and harmonization) Investments in:

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