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From the conference Competence 50+ 2007 in Gothenburg, Sweden.

From the conference Competence 50+ 2007 in Gothenburg, Sweden.

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  • 1.
    • Jobsis Mentoring Model in Social & Health care Sectors
    • THE JOBSIS EQUAL PROJECT
    • 1.11. 2004 to 31.12. 2007
    • Satu Mäkinen
    • Project Co-ordinator,
    • M.NSc., R.N.
    • The Seinäjoki University of Applied Sciences
    • Finland
  • 2.  
  • 3.
    • INTRODUCTION OF THE JOBSIS EQUAL PROJECT
    • The JOBSIS EQUAL project (ESR) is a three-year-long Community Initiative project carried out by the Seinäjoki University of Applied Sciences. The project is carried out in the region of South Ostrobothnia.
  • 4. First aim of the project:
    • I To help social and health care professionals with a secondary education (jobseekers and people working in other fields or returning from child-care leave)
    • find employment in their field.
  • 5.
    • > Access to working life is promoted by means of a job rotation and Jobsis Mentoring Model.
    • > Jobseekers are offered the opportunity to update their professional competence and job seeking skills through theory and practical training periods.
  • 6. Second aim of the project is:
    • II To promote the occupational wellbeing and coping with work of people (40 +) working in health care or social services through, mentoring and rehabilitation
  • 7.
    • The Jobsis Mentoring Model allows the recruitment of new employees to the work community. This does not add any extra costs to the employers, but requires that the employee chosen for rehabilitation has the opportunity to shift to shorter working hours (30 h/week) during the mentoring relationship.
  • 8.
    • Mentees, jobseekers, who are participating in Jobsis’s further training, do some of the rehabilitees’ work as a practical training. This gives an possibility for shorter working hours.
    • These kinds of “active” shorter working hours, implemented with full salary, oblige the rehabilitee to commit to the implementation of his/her own, individually designed rehabilitation plan.
  • 9.  
  • 10.
      • I Jobsis Mentoring Model
    • 1. Definition of main concepts
    • 2. Theoretical backround
    • 3. The Mentoring Model and it´s four stages
    • 4 . The process of Jobsis Mentoring Model in practise
  • 11.
    • 1. Definition of main concepts
    • > Mentoring is seen in this project:
    • ♦ A method promoting the competence of an employee at the beginning of their career or after having some time being at work
    • ♦ Steady and developing interaction between an experienced employee and a less experienced one, who is attending a futher training period
    • ♦ In mentoring, a more experienced employee transfers their tacit knowledge to the one attending the further training period
  • 12.
    • > Mentee is seen in this project:
    • ♦ She/ he is active, self-piloting and reflective person, who is interaction with the learning environment. She/ he learns from experiences
    • ♦ Motivated, capable of co-operation and taking feedback, initiative, flexible and identifies learning goals & expand achievement of vision
  • 13.
    • > Mentor is seen in this project:
    • ♦ She/ he is experienced, trustworthy, motivated and commit to be a mentor.
    • ♦ She/ he encourages mentee to seek answers to question, inspires, helps to seek solutions and helps mentee to clearly recognise their impact. It´s important, that mentor creates a strong positive image of self worth
  • 14.
    • > Individual learning plan (ILP) is seen in this project:
    • ♦ It´s a form, where mentee writes down her/his personal learning goals during the two first week in practical training period.
    • ♦ She/ he decides the learning goals, after talking with mentor
  • 15.
    • 2. Theoretical backround
    • ♦ Kolbs´s model of learning
    • > Self-piloting and active
    • > Learning by doing
    • > Capable of reflective thinking
    • > View of holistic learning
  • 16. 3. The Mentoring Model and it´s four stages
    • Mentee Mentor
    Freeing up I Stage To strengthen a positive identity of mentees profession Envisioning II Stage To encourage to be active, self-direction and to reflective thinking Implementing III Stage To train and quide for learning more professional skill & know -how Sustaining Peer review & collegiality IV Stage Learning goals are achieved
  • 17.
    • 4.The process of Jobsis Mentoring Model in practise
    • Content of further training:
    • ♦ Theory of Jobsis Mentoring model & Mentoring quidebook
    • ♦ The individual learning plan
    • ♦ 4 weeks theory (about social or health care theory)
    • ♦ 14 weeks practical training ( by mentoring)
  • 18. Discussion with the audience about next topic:
    • Do you have experience about similar kind of mentoring models?
    • a) Similarities b) Differences
  • 19.
    • II Methodology and analysis of the data
    • 1. Background information about the target group:
    • ♦ 17 jobseekers, who took part in Jobsis further training period and it´s mentoring process as a mentee
    • - 2 working in other fields than social or health care
    • - 8 returning from child-care leave
    • - 7 unemployed
  • 20.
    • ♦ 8 of them have a social care professionall (e.g. social workers)
    • ♦ 9 of them have a health care professionall
    • (e.g. registered nurses/ n=9)
    • ♦ Age between 26-50; average 37 years of age
    • ♦ 16 female and 1 male
  • 21.
    • 2. Testing method of the model and analysis of the data
    • ♦ Kvantitative method
    • > questionnaire including open questions
    • ♦ To get an overall picture of views and knowledge of target group, the data are described by frequencies and percentages
    • ♦ The open questions were analysed by content analysis
  • 22.
    • III Results of Jobsis Mentoring Model as a learning tool:
    • a) Further training´s theoretical part (4 weeks)
    • Mentees:
    • 80% of mentees thought, that the theoretical part updated their knowledge about social/ health care.
    • They also thought, that the theoretical part did support their individual learning plan and it´s goals
    • 20% disagreed
    • - too must general knowlegde, needed more specific knowlegde
  • 23.
    • Mentees:
    • 81% achieved individual learning goals
    • Things which support this:
    • Mentoring model and mentor´s support
    • Motivated mentor
    • Confidenced relarionship between mentor and mentee
    • Learning goals were realistic and well confined
    • Work unit´s positive additude towards mentoring
    • Mentee´s self-piloting and active role
  • 24.
    • 13 % didn´t achieved individual learning goals
    • Things which influenced to this:
    • Mentor wasn´t consciousness of mentee´s individual learning goals
    • Mentor wasn´t commited to be a mentor
    • 6 % couldn´t say opinion of this matter
  • 25.
    • Mentors:
    • 94% thought, that mentees achieved their learning goals
    • Things which support this:
    • Good cooperation and mentor´s motivation
    • Clear learning goals, which were written down together
    • Discussions
    • Work unit´s support and positive attitude towards mentoring
  • 26.
    • b) Mentoring relationship between mentor and mentee
    • Mentees:
    • 75% of mentees thought, that the mentoring relationship did support their holistic learning in the work unit
    • Things which support this:
    • Mentor gave to mentee enought space and responsibility
    • Discussions with mentor about the learning goals and the way of working
    • Mentee´s suitable personality for being a mentor
    • Positive attitude
    • Mentor´s long working experience
  • 27.
    • Mentors:
    • 100% of mentors thought, that the mentoring relationship did support mentee´s holistic learning in the work unit
    • Things which support this most:
    • Regular discussions between mentee and mentor
    • Discussions with mentee about the learning goals and the way of working
    • Personal and realistic learning goals
    • Mentee´s positive and motivated attitude to learn
  • 28.
    • 19% of mentees thought, that the mentoring relationship did not support their holistic learning in the work unit
    • Mentor´s and mentee´s different working shifts
    • Too much hurry in the work unit/ not enough time for mentoring
    • Mentor was not motivated to be a mentor
    • Mentor was not suitable to be a mentor
    • Too little discussions with mentor about the learning goals and the way of working
    • 6% couldn´t say opinion of this matter
  • 29.
    • c) Mentoring model as an effective learning tool
    • Mentees:
    • 62,5 % of mentees thought, that mentoring model is an effective learning tool
    • - Mentoring model´s stages clarify the learning process
    • - The structure of the model is a practical tool for mentor and mentee;
          • for process evaluation about learning
          • for deep discussions about mentor´s and mentee´s role
          • For discussions about mentoring process and learning´s progress
  • 30.
    • 12,5% (n= 2) of mentees thought , that mentoring model is not an effective learning tool
    • Things which influenced to this most:
    • Mentor´s negative attitude towards mentoring model
    • Difficulty to connect mentoring model´s theory and practice
    • Not enought time for practice mentoring
    • 25% (n= 3) couldn´t say opinion of this matter
    • 87,5% thought, that Jobsis´s further training and mentoring did strenghen their self esteem and professional identity!
  • 31.
    • Mentors:
    • 100 % of mentors thought, that mentoring model is an effective learning tool
    • The mentoring model gave to both, mentor and mentee,an opportunity to learn and grow in their profession
    • It gave an opportunity to try new way of working
    • Mentoring model supported mentor´s and mentee´s equality, reflective thinking and active role
    • The support of the chief and the whole work unit´s staff
    • The mentoring model´s stages clarified the learning process
  • 32.
    • 12 from 17 got a working place after Jobsis further training inculding mentoring model!
    • The workplaces were in the social and health care sectors!
  • 33. Mentee´s life situation & The Culture of the working unit Factors effecting mentoring process: Motivation Choosing a mentor Individual learning plan Work unit´s action plan Orientation programme of work unit Training for mentoring Resources for mentoring Agreement for mentoring MODEL OF MENTORING
  • 34. Discussion with the audience about next topic:
    • Do you have experience about the things, which effects into mentoring process?
  • 35. Discussion with the audience about next topic:
    • Do you have experience about the mentoring models evaluation as a learning tool?
  • 36.
    • IV Conclutions:
    • ♦ Through The Jobsis mentoring model the tacit knowledge could be transfed effectively from older workers to younger
    • workers
    • ♦ The whole learning process can be followed and evaluated by mentoring model´s evaluation method.
    • ♦ Sufficient labour force is needed in future more because lack of workers and before the older workers do retire.
  • 37.
    • V Recommendations
    • ♦ The decision makers should notice the effectiveness
    • of Jobsis further training course.
    • ♦ This further training tool and mentoring model should be used in social and health care sectors.
    • ♦ It is recommended for jobseekers returning back to social and health care sectors.
    • ♦ Mentoring model based on these proposals is recommended because it´s effectiveness to transfer tacit knowledge from ageing people to younger workers
  • 38.  
  • 39.
    • National partners:
    • EPANET professor Asko Suikkanen from the University of Lapland
    • The Centre of Expertise in Social Services of Regions of Ostrobothnia
    • Regional social and health care organisations, enterprices
    • The Employment and Economic Development Centre
    • Emplyment offices
    • Job seekers in the social and health care sectors
    • UNIC Services Ltd
    • Transnational partners:
    • TICK – TOCK Equal project, implementing in the England
    • Ageing at Work Equal project, implementing in the France
  • 40.