The Future of Coal Fired Power Generation Technologies

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  • 1. The Future of Coal Fired Power Generation TechnologiesReport Details:Published:August 2012No. of Pages: 121Price: Single User License – US$2875Many of the worlds largest economies, including the US and China, have based their prosperityon the availability of electricity from coal. However coal is also an extremely dirty fuel and itscombustion is one of the main sources of carbon dioxide, responsible for global warming. Thefuture of coal burning for power generation depends on adapting to new environmentalrestrictions.Features and benefits•Realize up to date competitive intelligence through a comprehensive review of coal fired power generation technologies concepts.•Assess the emerging trends in coal fired power generation technologies.•Identify which key trends will offer the greatest growth potential and learn which technology trends are likely to allow greater market impact.•Compare how manufacturers are developing coal fired power generation technologies.•Quantify costs of coal fired power generation technologies, with comparisons against other forms of power generation technology.HighlightsCoal accounts for over 40% of total global electrical generation - more than 1,700TWh in 2010 -and the installed generating capacity in 2010 was around 1,500GW out of a world total of4,500GW.Total global proven reserves at the end of 2010 were 860,938 mtonnes. Total coal production in2009 was an estimated 6,903 mtonnes of which 5,990 mtonnes were hard coal and 913 mtonneswere lignite. This compares with production in 2008 of 6,759 mtonnes. Total hard coal productionin 1990 was 3,497 mtonnes.Japan is the most important coal importer, consuming 165 mtonnes of imports in 2009. China isnow the second largest importer with 137 mtonnes in 2009, followed by South Korea with 103mtonnes, India with 67 mtonnes, Taiwan with 60 mtonnes, Germany with 38 mtonnes and the UKwith 38 mtonnes.Your key questions answered•What are the drivers shaping and influencing coal fired power generation technology development in the electricity industry?•What does coal fired power generation cost? What will it cost in the future?
  • 2. •Which coal fired power generation technology types will be the winners and which the losers in terms power generated, cost and viability?•Which coal fired power generation technology types are likely to find favor with manufacturers moving forward?•Which emerging technologies are gaining in popularity and why?Get your copy of this report @http://www.reportsnreports.com/reports/187727-the-future-of-coal-fired-power-generation-technologies.htmlMajor points covered in Table of Contents of this report includeTable of ContentsDr Paul BreezeDisclaimerEXECUTIVE SUMMARYAn introduction to coal fired power generationThe coal resourceConventional coal-fired power generation technologyAdvanced coal cyclesCarbon dioxide transport and storageCoal combustion, politics and the environmentThe cost of coal-fired power generationThe future of coal fired power generationAn introduction to coal fired power generationSummaryIntroductionEmission control and the coal-fired power plant marketEnergy securityThe structure of the reportThe coal resourceSummaryIntroductionGlobal coal reservesCoal productionCoal consumptionCoal tradeConventional coal-fired power generation technologySummaryIntroductionConventional coal burning technologyCoal-fired boilersBoiler typesPlant efficiency and carbon dioxide emissions
  • 3. Steam turbines and coal plant sizeFluidized bed boilersEmission controlSulphur dioxide controlNitrogen oxide controlDustMercuryCarbon dioxide removalCarbon capture retrofittingBiomass cofiringAdvanced coal cyclesSummaryIntroductionCoal gasificationCoal gasification with carbon captureOxyfuel combustionChemical loopingFuel cellsCarbon dioxide transport and storageSummaryIntroductionCarbon dioxide storageMonitoring of storage sitesCarbon transportationNetwork developmentCoal combustion, politics and the environment; issues of legislation and regulationSummaryIntroductionCoal miningThe products of coal combustionEmission control regulatory strategiesCoal subsidiesThe cost of coal-fired power generationSummaryIntroductionThe cost of coalThe capital cost of a coal-fired power plantThe levelized cost of electricity from coal-fired power stationsThe future of coal-fired power generationSummaryIntroductionCoal consumption growth
  • 4. Coal for power generationThe competition: levelized cost comparisons with other generation sourcesThe market for coal-fired power generationThe future of coal-fired power generationAppendixBibliography/ReferencesList of TablesTable: Proportion of coal in power generation mix for leading countries (%), 2010Table: Coal types, 2011Table: Proven coal reserves to the end of 2010 (mtonnes)Table: Proved recoverable reserves from World Energy Council, 2008Table: Top ten countries by resource (mtonnes), 2008Table: World coal production (mtonnes), 2010Table: Top ten hard coal producers (mtonnes), 2009Table: Global annual coal consumption (mtonnes), 2010Table: Global coal consumption by region (mtonnes)Table: Top ten coal consumers (mtonnes oil equivalent), 2010Table: Top coal exporters (mtonnes), 2009Table: Top coal importers (mtonnes), 2009Table: Coal-fired boiler steam conditions and efficiency, 2011Table: Typical carbon dioxide production per kWh as a function of efficiency in a coal-fired plant(kgCO 2 /kg coal), 2011Table: EU Emission limitsTable: US emission standards, 2011Table: Sulphur dioxide removal systemsTable: Nitrogen Oxide removal systems, 2011Table: Effect of retrofitting carbon capture on plant efficiency (%), 2011Table: IGCC plant efficiency (%), 2011Table: Main characteristics of alternative combustion technologies, 2011Table: Fuel cell types and characteristics, 2011Table: Potential global underground storage capacities (Gt CO 2 ), 2011Table: Potential length of carbon dioxide transportation network (km), 2010Table: The products of coal combustion, 2011Table: Global fossil fuel subsidies ($bn), 2011Table: The historical cost of coal in the US ($/tonne)Table: Northern European coal prices ($/t)Table: 2008 steam coal for power generation prices (£/t)Table: Capital cost of coal-fired power plants with and without carbon capture ($/kW), 2011Table: Capital cost of coal fired plants in the US, 2011Table: The cost of electricity from coal fired power plants 2010-2015 ($/MWh), 2010Table: Levelized cost of electricity from coal-fired power plants with and without carbon capture,
  • 5. 2011Table: Levelized cost of electricity base on Lazard analysis ($/MWh), 2010Table: Levelized cost of electricity for US coal-fired plants entering service in 2016Table: Historical and predicted total coal consumption, by region (mtoe), 2011Table: Coals share of global electricity sector generation (%), 2010Table: Coals share of power generation, by region (%), 2010Table: Levelized cost of electricity for plants entering service in 2015Table: US levelized cost of electricity for plants entering service in 2016 ($/MWh), 2011List of FiguresFigure: Proportion of coal in power generation mix for leading countries (%), 2010Figure: Proven coal reserves to the end of 2010Figure: Proved recoverable reserves from World Energy Council, 2008Figure: Top ten countries by resource (mtonnes), 2008Figure: World coal production (mtonnes), 2010Figure: Top ten hard coal producers (mtonnes), 2009Figure: Global annual coal consumption (mtonnes), 2010Figure: Global coal consumption by region (mtonnes)Figure: Top ten coal consumers (mtonnes oil equivalent), 2010Figure: Top coal exporters (mtonnes), 2009Figure: Top coal importers (mtonnes), 2009Figure: Typical carbon dioxide production per kWh as a function of efficiency in a coal-fired plant(kgCO 2 /kg coal), 2011Figure: Potential global underground storage capacities (Gt CO 2 ), 2011Figure: Potential length of carbon dioxide transportation network (km), 2010Figure: Global fossil fuel subsidies ($bn), 2011Figure: Northern European coal prices ($/t)Figure: 2008 steam coal for power generation prices (£/t)Figure: Capital cost of coal fired plants in the US, 2011Figure: Levelized cost of electricity base on Lazard analysis ($/MWh), 2010Figure: Historical and predicted total coal consumption, by region (mtoe), 2011Figure: Coals share of global electricity sector generation (%), 2010Figure: Levelized cost of electricity for plants entering service in 2015Figure: US levelized cost of electricity for plants entering service in 2016 ($/MWh), 2011Contact: sales@reportsandreports.com for more information.