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ReportsnReports – Natural and Organic Foods and Beverages in the U.S., 3rd Edition
 

ReportsnReports – Natural and Organic Foods and Beverages in the U.S., 3rd Edition

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This completely revised report, Natural and Organic Foods and Beverages in the U.S., 3rd Edition, examines sales and growth potential, identifying key issues and trends that will affect the ...

This completely revised report, Natural and Organic Foods and Beverages in the U.S., 3rd Edition, examines sales and growth potential, identifying key issues and trends that will affect the marketplace through 2015. Extensive analysis via both proprietary primary data from Packaged Facts’ February 2011 Online Consumer Survey and via Experian Simmons’ national consumer panel data gauges consumer attitudes and behaviors toward natural/organic foods and beverages, retail shopping patterns, and media usage and preferences, both traditional and social. Also included is comprehensive coverage of new product trends across dozens of categories, drawing on new product data from Datamonitor’s Product Launch Analytics database; dozens of images of products and print ads; and profiles of trend-making marketers and retailers. Interviews with industry experts round out this forward-looking market analysis, along with the context of the broader social, economic and psychographic drivers of consumer behavior and shopping preferences.

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    ReportsnReports – Natural and Organic Foods and Beverages in the U.S., 3rd Edition ReportsnReports – Natural and Organic Foods and Beverages in the U.S., 3rd Edition Document Transcript

    • Natural and Organic Foods and Beverages in the U.S., 3rd EditionU.S. retail sales of natural and organic foods and beverages rose to nearly $39 billion in2010, an increase of 9% over the previous year‟s sales of $35 billion, far outpacing growthin conventional groceries, which crept ahead less than 2%. Despite the continued sluggisheconomic recovery, Packaged Facts projects sales to more than double by 2015, to exceed$78 billion. Growth will be jump-started in 2011, in great part due to snack king Frito-Lay‟sswitching half its snack portfolio to all-natural formulations. In addition, attracted by thehigher growth rates of natural/organic foods and beverages and in response to consumerdemand, other major consumer product companies are becoming more deeply committed tonatural and organic products, either through acquisition or internal development. Suchdeep-pocketed marketers are in a good position to fast-track their products into retail storesand onto consumer tables via their massive product development capabilities, far-reachingdistribution networks, and huge advertising and marketing budgets.Buy Now: Natural and Organic Foods and Beverages in the U.S. MarketBrowse All: Latest Market Research ReportsThis completely revised report, Natural and Organic Foods and Beverages in the U.S., 3rdEdition, examines sales and growth potential, identifying key issues and trends that willaffect the marketplace through 2015. Extensive analysis via both proprietary primary datafrom Packaged Facts‟ February 2011 Online Consumer Survey and via Experian Simmons‟national consumer panel data gauges consumer attitudes and behaviors towardnatural/organic foods and beverages, retail shopping patterns, and media usage andpreferences, both traditional and social. Also included is comprehensive coverage of newproduct trends across dozens of categories, drawing on new product data fromDatamonitor‟s Product Launch Analytics database; dozens of images of products and printads; and profiles of trend-making marketers and retailers. Interviews with industry expertsround out this forward-looking market analysis, along with the context of the broader social,economic and psychographic drivers of consumer behavior and shopping preferences.Latest Market Research Reports:North American Enterprise Mobile Cloud Computing Market 2010-2014North America Electronic Health Records Market 2010-2014Global Security Software for Consumers Market 2010-2014Global SCADA Based Industrial Control Systems Market 2010-2014Global SAN Volume Controller Market 2010-2014Food Shopper Insights: Grocery Shopping Trends in the U.S.Hotel Foodservice Trends in the U.S.
    • TABLE OF CONTENTSChapter 1: Executive SummaryScope of ReportDefinition of “Natural”Definition of “Organic”Some Foodservice CrossoverReport MethodologyThe MarketRetail Sales of Natural/Organic Foods and Beverages Approach $39 Billion in 2010Produce and Dairy Are the Largest CategoriesFigure 1-1: Share of U.S. Retail Sales of Natural and Organic Foods and Beverages byProduct Category, 2011 (percent)Mass-Market Channels Capture Almost Half of Retail SalesAn Expanding IndustryThe MarketersGlobal Marketers, Investors Control Many Top Brands of Natural and Organic Foods andBeveragesRecent Mergers and AcquisitionsMainstream Marketers Going NaturalOrganic Extensions of Mainstream Lines Not Very SuccessfulIs Selling the Company Selling Out?The Gourmet/Natural Foods SynergySelling Nutritional BenefitsSelling ConveniencePrivate-Label Natural and Organic Products BoomingNew Product TrendsOverviewAlmost 2,900 Natural and Organic Products Launched in 2010Table 1-1: Number of Natural and Organic Food and Beverage Product Launches, 2006-2010“Natural” the Most Popular Product TagFunctional Drinks, Tea Top New Product LaunchesALDI, Hain Celestial, Whole Foods Lead Product IntroductionsNatural and Organic Products Promote Ethical CausesConsumer Trends37% of Consumers Seek Out Natural/Organic Foods and BeveragesTable 1-2: Percent of U.S. Adult Consumers by Level of Agreement with the Statement “ISeek Out Natural/Organic Foods and Beverages,” February 2011 (overall, consumers whobuy organic groceries, and consumers who buy packaged foods marketed as “all-natural”)Supermarkets the Most Popular Place to Get Natural/Organic FoodsFresh Fruit and Veggies Are the Most Popular Organic CategoriesHigh Socioeconomic Status Characterizes Organic/Natural ShoppersAttitudes Toward Food and CookingAttitudes Toward NutritionOne Out of Three Households Use Organic Produce
    • Attitudes and Opinions Toward FoodserviceInternet Has Changed How Consumers Spend Free TimeConsumers and Traditional MediaChapter 2: The MarketMarket OverviewScope of ReportDefinition of “Natural”Definition of “Organic”Some Foodservice CrossoverControversies Over Organic and Natural LabelingMarket Size and GrowthMethodology for Sales EstimatesQuantifying Sales of Organic Foods and BeveragesQuantifying Sales of Natural Foods and BeveragesRetail Sales of Natural/Organic Foods and Beverages Approach $39 Billion in 2010Table 2-1: U.S. Retail Sales of Natural and organic Foods and Beverages, 2006-2015 (inbillions of dollars)Natural Foods and Beverages: A Larger Slice of a Bigger PieFigure 2-1: Share of U.S. Retail Sales of Natural and Organic Foods and Beverages byMarket Segment: Natural vs. Organic, 2010 vs. 2006 (percent)Produce and Dairy Are the Largest CategoriesFigure 2-2: Share of U.S. Retail Sales of Natural and Organic Foods and Beverages byProduct Category, 2011 (percent)Mass-Market Channels Capture Almost Half of Retail SalesFigure 2-3: Share of U.S. Retail Sales of Natural and Organic Foods and Beverages by RetailChannel, 2011 (percent)Market OutlookThe Economy and Its ImpactOrganic vs. NaturalBrand Organic?And Certify Natural?The Consumer ComponentFigure 2-4: Percent of U.S. Adult Consumers Who Agree with the Statement I Seek OutNatural and Organic Foods and Beverages,” February 2011Nearly 60% of Organic Grocery Shoppers Anticipate Increasing Organic/Natural PurchasesFigure 2-5: Percent of U.S. Adult Grocery Shoppers Who Buy Organic Groceries Who Agreeor Disagree with the Statement “I Anticipate an Increasing Proportion of the Groceries I UseWill Be Organic or “All-Natural,” February 2011Figure 2-6: Percent of U.S. Adult Grocery Shoppers Who Buy Packaged Foods Marketed as“All-Natural” (But Not Organic)Who Agree or Disagree with the Statement “I Anticipate an Increasing Proportion of theGroceries I Use Will Be Organic or “All-Natural,” February 2011Organic Foods and Beverages Carry a Price PremiumHow Willing Are Consumers to Pay More for Organics?Organic Farming Takes RootTable 2-2: U.S. Certified Organic Acreage, 1992, 2000, 2003, 2005, and 2008
    • Young Farmers Joining the FieldAn Expanding Industry and MarketplaceSometimes It‟s Difficult to Produce Organic or All-Natural FoodsCensus 2010: Nation Is Older, More EthnicTable 2-3: Demographic Snapshot of the U.S. Population, 2010Health Issues Continue to Drive SalesNew 2010 Dietary GuidelinesMyPlate Icon Replaces Food PyramidIllustration 2-1: The New MyPlate Food Icon, Introduced in June 2011Illustration 2-2: The Old MyPyramid Food Icon Introduced in 2005Reasons for Buying Natural/Organic Foods and BeveragesThe Fear FactorOverlap Between Natural/Organic and Gourmet/Premium FoodsTable 2-4: Percent of U.S. Adult Consumers by Level of Agreement with the Statement “ISeek Out Gourmet Foods and Beverages,” February 2011 (overall, consumers who buyorganic groceries, and consumers who buy packaged foods marketed as “all-natural”)Going LocalTable 2-5: Percent of U.S. Adults by Level of Agreement with the Statement “I Seek OutLocal and Seasonal Foods,” February 2011 (overall, consumers who buy organic groceries,and consumers who buy packaged foods marketed as “all-natural”)Artisan FoodsTable 2-6: Percent of U.S. Adult Consumers by Level of Agreement with the Statement “ILike to Buy Products with Artisan or Hand-Made Appeal,” February 2011 (overall, consumerswho buy organic groceries, and consumers who buy packaged foods marketed as “all-natural”)Romancing the ProductsMany Natural/Organic Foods and Beverages Support Other Environmental and Social IssuesTable 2-7: Percent of U.S. Adult Consumers by Level of Agreement with the Statement“Environmental and Ecological Issues Are Very Important to Me,” February 2011 (overall,consumers who buy organic groceries, and consumers who buy packaged foods marketed as“allnatural”)Table 2-8: Percent of U.S. Adult Consumers by Level of Agreement with the Statement “ITake Recycling Very Seriously,” February 2011 (overall, consumers who buy organicgroceries, and consumers who buy packaged foods marketed as “all-natural”)Sustainable PackagingHumane Treatment of Animals and Sustainable SeafoodThe GMO DebateNew Tests May Verify Organic ClaimsProjected Market Growth: U.S. Retail Sales Will Top $78.4 Billion by 2015Chapter 3: The MarketersMarketer OverviewGlobal Marketers, Investors Control Many Top Brands of Natural and Organic Foods andBeveragesRecent Mergers and AcquisitionsMainstream Marketers Going Natural
    • Organic Extensions of Mainstream Lines Not Very SuccessfulIs Selling the Company Selling Out?The Gourmet/Natural Foods SynergyFigure 3-1: Number of Natural and Organic Food and Beverage Launches by “Upscale” or“Gourmet” Package Tag/Claim, 2006-2010Selling Nutritional BenefitsTable 3-1: Number of Natural and Organic Food and Beverage Launches By Selected“Nutritional” Package Tags/Claims, 2006-2010Selling ConvenienceFigure 3-2: Number of Natural and Organic Food and Beverage Launches By Selected“Convenience” Package Tags/Claims, 2006-2010Private-Label Natural and Organic Products BoomingFigure 3-3: Private-Label Natural and Organic Food and Beverage Launches, 2006-2010Advertising and Marketing TrendsMarketers Ally Themselves with Social and Environmental CausesGood WorksNewman‟s OnIllustration 3-1: Newman‟s Own Ad Encourages Consumers to VolunteerClif BarIllustration 3-2: Clif Bar‟s 2 Mile Challenge Promotes Riding BikesGuerilla Marketing TechniquesIllustration 3-3: Stonyfield Farm Lids Tout Environmental and Social CausesCEOs Rap to Promote Organic Food and BeveragesIllustration 3-4: Stonyfield CEO Gary Hirshberg Sings Out to Promote Eating OrganicIllustration 3-5: Honest Tea CEO Seth Goldman‟s “Rethink What You Drink!” RapTargeting Kids Through EntertainmentIllustration 3-6: Disney Channel Commercial for Horizon Organic MilkMaking Use of Websites and Social MediaTable 3-2: Percent of U.S. Adult Consumers by Level of Agreement with the Statement “IAm Active on Online or Mobile Social Networks (e.g., Facebook or Twitter),” February 2011(overall, consumers who buy organic groceries, and consumers who buy packaged foodsmarketed as “all-natural”)Websites and Social MediaStarbucks Savvy About Social MediaIllustration 3-7: Starbucks Mines its Facebook Fans for DataPepsiCo‟s Near East Food Products Less of a SuccessIllustration 3-8: Cooking Video on YouTube for Near East CouscousIllustration 3-9: Near East‟s Couscous Caravan Offers Free Samples at Outdoor VenuesAdvertising and Marketing PositioningIllustration 3-10: Ad for Campbell‟s Select Harvest Soup Conveys Multiple MessagesCompetitive PositioningIllustration 3-11: Sierra Mist Natural Takes on SpriteIllustration 3-12: A Wisconsin Family Accepts the “Silk for Milk 10-Day Challenge”Consumer TestimonialsIllustration 3-13: Consumers Testimonials in Mezzetta Pasta Sauce AdGood Enough to Serve My Own Family
    • Illustration 3-14: Frito-Lay‟s Ingredients Buyer Selects All Natural IngredientsLimited EditionIllustration 3-15: Muir Glen Reserve Tomatoes “Limited Edition” AdNutritional BenefitsIllustration 3-16: Whole Grain Barilla Pasta AdIllustration 3-17: Great Day All-Natural Eggs AdIllustration 3-18: Sargento Reduced Sodium Cheese AdPoetry in MotionIllustration 3-19: Fage Commercials: Poetry in MotionIllustration 3-20: Starbucks Natural Fusions Coffee AdReal PeopleIllustration 3-21: Chobani Yogurt‟s Campaign Uses Real People‟s StoriesSimple IngredientsIllustration 3-22: Häagen-Dazs Five AdStatusIllustration 3-23: Green & Black‟s Organic Chocolate AdTasteIllustration 3-24: Newman‟s Own Salad Dressings AdCompetitor ProfilesAmy‟s Kitchen, IncThe Nation‟s Leading Organic Frozen Foods BrandClif Bar & CompanyRaising the Ethical BarDole Food Co., Inc.Sustainable Organic BananasIllustration 3-25: Dole Organic Lets Consumers Trace Bananas to the Farm Where TheyWere GrownEVOL FoodsThe EVOL Empire is Growing and EvolvingFrito-LayGoing NaturalThe Hain Celestial Group, Inc.Growth Through AcquisitionsHonest TeaAcquired by Coca-ColaBenefits for Both SidesNewman‟s Own, Inc.Wholly Dedicated to PhilanthropyOrganic ValleyOwned by a Cooperative of FarmersStonyfield Farm, Inc.A Model for Corporate Responsibility
    • Chapter 4: New Product TrendsOverviewAlmost 2,900 Natural and Organic Products Launched in 2010Table 4-1: Number of Natural and Organic Food and Beverage Product Launches, 2006-2010Table 4-2: Natural and Organic Percent of All New Product Launches, 2006-2010 (based ontotal number of new product reports)“Natural” the Most Popular Product TagTable 4-3: Top 10 Product Claims on New Food and Beverage Products, 2006, 2008, and2010Functional Drinks, Tea Top New Product LaunchesTable 4-4: Top 20 Product Categories for Natural and Organic Food and Beverage ProductLaunches, 2006-2010ALDI, Hain Celestial, Whole Foods Lead Product IntroductionsTable 4-5: Top 15 U.S. Marketers of Natural and Organic Foods and Beverages by Numberof New Product Reports, 2006-2010Macro TrendsNatural and Organic Products Promote Ethical CausesIllustration 4-1: EarthGrains Bread, Made with 20% Eco-Grain WheatIllustration 4-2: Home Chef Kitchen Soup Is Certified HumaneMore Dairies and Retailers Go Hormone-FreeDemand for Gluten-Free Foods SurgingIllustration 4-3: Gluten-Free Café Canned Soups (Natural)Illustration 4-4: Rudi‟s Gluten-Free Bread (Natural)Illustration 4-5: Amy‟s Kitchen Gluten-Free Frozen Pizza (Organic)SuperfoodsList of Superfruits Is GrowingIllustration 4-6: Celestial Seasonings‟ Kombucha—Exotic Flavors and Health Benefits(Natural)MoriheiyaIllustration 4-7: GreeNoodle Instant Noodles (Natural)Chia SeedsIllustratio 4-8: Mary‟s Gone Crackers Pretzel Sticks with Chia Seeds (Organic)Illustration 4-9: ChiaVie Superfruit Smoothie Combines Chia Seeds + Fruit (Natural)Going CoconutsCompetition Intensifying in Coconut WaterIllustration 4-10: Phenom Fortified Coconut Water (Natural)Coconut Milk Becomes a BeverageIllustration 4-11: Silk PureCoconut Milk (Natural)Illustration 4-12: So Delicious Coconut Water Sorbet (Organic)Next Up, Coconut Oil and Coconut SugarIllustration 4-13: Pamela‟s Products Cheesecake, Sweetened with Agave and Coconut Sugar(Natural)Stevia as a Natural SweetenerIllustration 4-14: Honest Tea Stevia-Sweetened Tea (Organic)Illustration 4-15: Stevia-Sweetened Rainforest Cola (Natural)Illustration 4-16: Stevia-Sweetened R.W. Knudsen Light Juices (Natural)
    • Illustration 4-17: Stevia-Sweetened Breyer‟s YoCrunch Yogurt (Naturally Sweetened)Local Trend Continues to GrowBaby and Kid-Targeted Foods Play Up SafetyIllustration 4-18: Earth‟s Best Whole Grain Rice Cereal (Organic)Illustration 4-19: HappyBaby Organic Baby Food Comes in BPA-Free PouchesCategory TrendsFrozen MealsIllustration 4-20: Amy‟s Light & Lean Frozen Meals (Natural/Organic)Illustration 4-21: Amy‟s Sonoma Veggie Burger (Natural/Organic)Illustration 4-22: Kashi Frozen Basil Pesto Pizza (Natural)Illustration 4-23: Kashi Frozen Black Bean Enchilada (Natural)Illustration 4-24: Michael Angelo‟s Frozen Italian-Style Pie (Natural)Illustration 4-25: GoodHeart All Natural Cuisine Steam-in-Bag Frozen MealsIllustration 4-26: GoodHeart All Natural Cuisine Frozen Kid‟s MealsIllustration 4-27: Organic Bistro Frozen Bowl MealIllustration 4-28: Cube Artisan Foods Chimichurri Wild Pacific Salmon (Natural)Illustration 4-29: Pineland Farms Natural BeefIllustration 4-30: Tandoor Chef‟s Frozen Balanced Vegetarian Meals (Natural)Illustration 4-31: Annie Chun‟s Frozen Potstickers (Organic)Illustration 4-32: EVOL Frozen Flatbreads (Natural)Side Dishes Go More InterestingIllustration 4-33: Green Giant Healthy Colors Frozen Vegetables (Natural)Illustration 4-34: Alexia Frozen Select Sides (Natural)Illustration 4-35: Alexia Frozen Sweet Potato Puffs (Natural)Illustration 4-36: Village Harvest Frozen Whole Grains (Natural)Dairy CaseMilk: Organic Includes DHA and Omega-3 FortificationIllustration 4-37: Horizon Organic DHA Omega-3 MilkIllustration 4-38: Organic Valley Omega-3 MilkMilk Alternatives: Almond Milk WarsIllustration 4-39: Blue Diamond Almond Breeze Almond Milk (Natural)Yogurt: It‟s All Greek to MeIllustration 4-40: Chobani Champions Greek Yogurt (Natural)Illustration 4-41: Fage Total 0% Yogurt, Now in Flavors (Natural)Illustration 4-42: Stonyfield Farm‟s Oikos Organic Greek YogurtIllustration 4-43: Cascade Fresh Amande Almond Milk Yogurt (Natural)Illustration 4-44: Straus Yogurt: Organic, Local, SustainableIllustration 4-45: Organic Valley Pourable Yogurt (Organic)Illustration 4-46: DAHlicious Lassi Yogurt Smoothies (Natural)Fresh ProduceIllustration 4-47: Earthbound Farm Organic Salad KitsIllustration 4-48: Dole Natural Salad KitsCereals and Cereal BarsIllustration 4-49: Kashi Berry Blossoms Cereal (Natural)Illustration 4-50: F-Factor Cereals and Cereal Bars (Natural)Illustration 4-51: Nature Valley Granola Thins (Natural)Snacks Go More NaturalIllustration 4-52: Frito-Lay All Natural Tostitos (Natural)
    • Illustration 4-53: Frito-Lay Tostitos and Lay‟s Dip Creations (Natural)Illustration 4-54: Boulder Canyon Tortilla Chips with Hummus & Sesame (Natural)Illustration 4-55: Snyder‟s Eatsmart Naturals Snacks (Natural)Illustration 4-56: Pepperidge Farm Baked Naturals Cracker Chips (Natural)Illustration 4-57: New York Style Risotto Chips (Natural)Hale Kale Chips!Illustration 4-58: Earth Chips Kale Chips (Organic)Illustration 4-59: Rhythm Kale Chips (Natural)DessertsCookiesIllustration 4-60: Amy‟s Shortbread Cookies (Natural/Organic)Ice Cream and Frozen DessertsIllustration 4-61: Häagen-Dazs Five Ice Cream (Natural)Illustration 4-62: Raw IceCream Raw, Vegan Frozen Desserts (Organic)Illustration 4-63: Jamba Frozen Fruit Sorbet (Natural)BeveragesCoffeeIllustration 4-64: Starbucks Natural Fusions Coffee (Natural)TeaIllustration 4-65: Lipton 100% Natural Iced TeaIllustration 4-66: The Republic of Tea Raw Green Bush Tea (Natural)Chocolate BeveragesIllustration 4-67: Honest Tea CocoaNova (Organic)Energy DrinksIllustration 4-68: Nestlé Jamba Energy Drinks (Natural)Sodas: Handcrafted and All-NaturalIllustration 4-69: Waialua Soda Works Kona Red Soda (Natural)Illustration 4-70: Sipp Sparkling Eco Beverage (Organic)Chapter 5: Retail TrendsTypes of Retail OutletsCompetitive SituationStore-within-a-Store Merchandising vs. IntegrationMarketers Teach Conventional Retailers How to Sell Natural/OrganicPrivate-Label Offerings ExplodeFigure 5-1: Number of Private-Label Natural and Organic Beverage Launches, 2006-2010Retailers Spearhead Animal Welfare StandardsPushing for Sustainable SeafoodSupermarkets vs. Foodservice: Blurring the BoundariesReally Local FarmsChef-Run Local MarketsThe World‟s First All-Natural/Organic Food CourtChannel and Retailer ProfilesWhole Food‟s Consolidation of Super Naturals and the Continued Growth of Trader Joe‟sConventional Retailers Develop Fresh Format StoresRetailer Profile: KrogerRetailer Profile: Safeway
    • Illustration 5-1: Safeway‟s O Organics Line of Over 300 ProductsIllustration 5-2: Safeway Open Nature 100% Natural Private-Label BrandSeveral Smaller Regional Chains Set Exemplary ExamplesCentral Market in Whole Foods‟ BackyardRetailer Profile: Publix Super Markets, a Public FavoriteRetailer Profile: Wegmans Raises the Bar on Grocery ShoppingIllustration 5-3: Wegmans Food You Feel Good About Private-Label Natural/Organic LineIllustration 5-4: Wegmans Organic Research Farm in Canandaigua, NYNatural Food StoresWhole Foods: The Natural Leader Reemerges as a Growth LeaderFocusing on Value Yields RewardsStrong Focus on Prepared Foods and In-Store DiningMission Driven Values and Aggressive PR ImagesNew Sustainable Seafood, Animal Welfare, and Healthy Eating InitiativesA „Game Changer‟ in the Retail Food BusinessRetailer Profile: The Secrets of Trader Joe‟sRetailer Profile: Sprouts Farmers MarketNatural Co-ops Experiencing a ResurgenceRetailer Profile: PCC Natural MarketsRetailer Profile: Park Slope Food CoopRetailer Profile: Rainbow GrocerySmall-Format Grocery StoresFresh & Easy: British Invasion Not So Easy GoingGourmet/Specialty Food StoresMass Merchandisers and SupercentersRetailer Profile: Walmart Forays into Healthier FoodsGroceries Grow to 54% of Walmart‟s SalesWalmart Revamps Great Value Private-Label Brand…… After Scaling Back Ambitious Organic PlansWalmart Announces Healthier Foods InitiativeWalmart Shifts Seafood to Sustainable SourcingRetailer Profile: Target Corp. Is Targeting FoodsTarget Pushing into Fresh FoodsContest for National Warehouse Club SupremacyRetailer Profile: Costco Wholesale Corp.Retailer Profile: Sam‟s ClubRetailer Profile: BJ‟s Wholesale ClubDrugstores Making a Play for FoodDrugstores Fight Back as Retail Lines BlurDrugstores Testing Fresh FoodsRetailer Profile: WalgreensRetailer Profile: CVS CaremarkCan the Drugstore Channel Compete in Fresh Foods?Convenience StoresFarmers‟ Markets Chart Double-Digit Growth in 2010Figure 5-2: Growth in Number of Farmers‟ Markets, 1994-2010 (number)Two Types of Farmers‟ MarketsFarmers‟ Markets Complain About Grocery CompetitionCommunity Supported Agriculture Programs (CSAs)
    • Internet and Mail OrderRetailer Profile: FreshDirectChapter 6: The Natural/Organic Foods ConsumerConsumer OverviewMethodology37% of Consumers Seek Out Natural/Organic Foods and BeveragesTable 6-1: Percent of U.S. Adult Consumers by Level of Agreement with the Statement “ISeek Out Natural/Organic Foods and Beverages,” February 2011 (overall, consumers whobuy organic groceries, and consumers who buy packaged foods marketed as “all-natural”)Half Are Willing to Pay More for Higher-Quality GroceriesTable 6-2: Percent of U.S. Grocery Shoppers Who Agree with the Statement “I Am Willing toPay More for Higher-Quality Groceries,” February 2011 (overall, consumers who buy organicgroceries, and consumers who buy packaged foods marketed as “all-natural”)Table 6-3: Percent of U.S. Grocery Shoppers by Level of Agreement with the Statement “IAm Willing to Pay More for Better-for-You Grocery Products,” February 2011 (overall,consumers who buy organic groceries, and consumers who buy packaged foods marketed as“all-natural”)Four Out of Five Think Organic Foods Are OverpricedTable 6-4: U.S. Adult Consumer Attitudes Toward Organic/Natural Foods and Beverages,February 2011 (overall, consumers who buy organic groceries, and consumers who buypackaged foods marketed as “allnatural”)Two out of Three Adults Have Changed Wellness LifestyleFigure 6-1: Percent of U.S. Adult Consumers by Level of Agreement with the Statement “MyWellness Goals and Behaviors Make My Lifestyle Significantly Different Than It Was 10 YearsAgo,” February 2011Table 6-5: Percent of U.S. Adult Grocery Shoppers by Level of Agreement with theStatement “The Groceries I Buy Are Determined In Part by Specific Wellness Goals,”February 2011 (overall, grocery shoppers who buy organic groceries, grocery shoppers whobuy packaged foods marketed as “allnatural”)More Organic/Natural Consumers Seek Specific-Purpose NutritionOrganic/Natural Consumers Want Extra-High Nutrition FoodsTable 6-6: Percent of U.S. Adult Consumers by Level of Agreement with the Statement “ISeek Out Foods and Grocery Products That Have Specific-Purpose Nutrition,” February 2011(overall, consumers who buy organic groceries, and consumers who buy packaged foodsmarketed as “all-natural”)Table 6-6: Percent of U.S. Adults by Level of Agreement with the Statement “I Seek OutFoods and Grocery Products That Have Extra-High Nutrition,” February 2011 (overall,consumers who buy organic groceries, and consumers who buy packaged foods marketed as“all-natural”)More Organic/Natural Shoppers Avoid Certain FoodsTable 6-7: Percent of Grocery Shoppers by Level of Agreement with the Statement “FoodRestrictions, Food Avoidances, or Food Allergies Play an Important Role in What I Eat,”February 2011 (overall, grocery shoppers who buy organic groceries, grocery shoppers whobuy packaged foods marketed as “all-natural”)Fresh Fruit and Veggies Are the Most Popular Organic CategoriesAlmost One Out of Four Adults Looks for Organic/Natural FoodsTable 6-8: Percent of U.S. Adult Grocery Shoppers Who Usually Buy Organic/Natural Foodsand Beverages, by Product Category, February 2011 (overall, consumers who usually buy
    • organic groceries, and consumers who usually buy packaged foods marketed as “all-natural”)Table 6-9: Number and Percentage of U.S. Adult Natural/Organic Consumers, 2006-2010(consumers who look for organic/natural foods and consumers who prefer foods withoutartificial additives)Supermarkets the Most Popular Place to Get Natural/Organic FoodsTable 6-10: Percent of U.S. Adult Grocery Shoppers Who Shop for Organic/Natural Foodsand Beverages, by Retail Channel, February 2011 (overall, who shop for organic groceries,and who shop for “all-natural”)Whole Foods and Trader Joe’sTable 6-11: Retail Shopping Patterns in the Past Month Among U.S. Adult Consumers, 2010(overall, consumers who look for organic/natural foods and consumers who prefer foodswithout artificial additives)Shopper Attitudes and BehaviorTable 6-12: U.S. Adult Consumer Attitudes/Behavior Toward Shopping, 2010 (overall,consumers who look for organic/natural foods and consumers who prefer foods withoutartificial additives)High Socioeconomic Status Characterizes Organic/Natural ShoppersTable 6-13: Selected High-Index Demographics of U.S. Adult Consumers Who Agree withthe Statement “When I Shop for Food, I Look for Organic/Natural, 2010Table 6-14: Demographic Overview of U.S. Adult Consumers Who Agree with the Statement“When I Shop for Food, I Look for Organic/Natural,” 2010 (percent, number and index ofU.S. Adult consumers)Upscale and Older Consumers Prefer No Artificial AdditivesTable 6-15: Selected High-Index Demographics of U.S. Adult Consumers Who Agree withthe Statement “I Prefer Foods Without Artificial Additives,” 2010Table 6-16: Demographic Overview of U.S. Adult Consumers Who Agree with the Statement“I Prefer Foods Without Artificial Additives,” 2010 (percent, number and index of U.S. Adultconsumers)Attitudes Toward Food and CookingAttitudes Toward NutritionTable 6-17: U.S. Adult Consumer Behavior/Attitudes Regarding Food and Cooking, 2010(overall, consumers who look for organic/natural foods, and consumers who prefer foodswithout artificial additives)Table 6-18: U.S. Adult Consumer Behavior/Attitudes Regarding Nutrition, 2010 (consumerswho look for organic/natural foods and consumers who prefer foods without artificialadditives)One Out of Three Households Use Organic ProduceTable 6-19: Leading Organic Foods by Level of U.S. Household Penetration, 2010 (percentof U.S. households)Milk Tops Organic List by IndexTable 6-20: Leading Organic Foods by U.S. Adult Consumer Indexes, 2010 (consumers wholook for organic/natural foods and consumers who prefer foods without artificial additives)Natural Foods Consumers and Restaurant UseTable 6-21: Frequency of Eating at Restaurants that Feature Organic Foods Among U.S.Adult Consumers, February 2011 (overall, consumers who buy organic groceries, andconsumers who buy packaged foods marketed as “allnatural”)Table 6-22: Frequency of Eating at Restaurants that Feature Distinctively “All-Natural,”
    • Fresh or Locally Grown Menus Among U.S. Adult Consumers, February 2011 (overall,consumers who shop for organic groceries, and consumers who shop for “all-natural”)Attitudes and Opinions Toward FoodserviceTable 6-23: U.S. Adult Consumer Attitudes/Opinions Toward Foodservice, 2010 (overall,consumers who look for organic/natural foods, and consumers who prefer foods withoutartificial additives)Consumers and MediaInternet Has Changed How Consumers Spend Free TimeTable 6-24: Internet-Related Lifestyle Changes Among U.S. Adult Consumers, 2010 (overall,consumers who look for organic/natural foods, and consumers who prefer foods withoutartificial additives)Internet Has Changed How Consumers ShopConsumers and Traditional MediaConsumer Attitudes Toward AdvertisingTable 6-25: Internet Usage Patterns Among U.S. Adult Consumers, 2010 (overall,consumers who look for organic/natural foods, and consumers who prefer foods withoutartificial additives)Table 6-26: Use of Traditional Media by U.S. Adult Consumers, 2010 (overall, consumerswho look for organic/natural foods, and consumers who prefer foods without artificialadditives)Table 6-27: U.S. Adult Consumer Attitudes Toward Advertising, 2010 (overall, consumerswho look for organic/natural foods, and consumers who prefer foods without artificialadditives)About Us:ReportsnReports is an online library of over 75,000 market research reports and in-depthmarket research studies & analysis of over 5000 micro markets. We provide 24/7 online andoffline support to our customers. Get in touch with us for your needs of market researchreports.Follow us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/marketsreportsOur Facebook Page: http://www.facebook.com/pages/ReportsnReports/191441427571689Contact:Mr.Priyank7557 Rambler road,Suite727,Dallas,TX75231Tel: +1-888-989-8004E-mail: sales@reportsnreports.comhttp://www.reportsnreports.comBlog: http://www.reportsnreportsblog.com