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Maintaining Growth in the Renewables Sector

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  • 1. Maintaining Growth in the Renewables SectorReport Details:Published:September 2012No. of Pages: 72Price: Single User License – US$2875This report looks at the evolution of renewable energy, from the factors that have led to significantand continuing growth, to those that may curb growth in the short term. The report identifiesgrowing awareness and acceptance of renewables as a driver, but concludes that the lack of astable investment environment could limit this growth and that a broader, longer-term strategy isneeded.Features and benefits•Gain insight into where the renewables sector is now and an overview of current trends broken down by fuel, region, country, end-user, and generator.•Understand likely future trends and the key issues leading to growth, including investment, cost- equivalence with fossil fuels, and energy security.•Understand the main factors that could cause renewables development to falter, including failure to disaggregate renewable energy by fuel.•Gain an overview of principal alternatives to renewables development and the strengths and weaknesses of these alternatives.•Gain recommendations and the basic components of the strategy needed at a national level to ensure continuing renewables growth.HighlightsThe days when renewables development was seen as a question of whether to implement aspecific renewable in a specific location are gone: renewables need to be seen as part of aportfolio of energy resources that may include other modern conventional technologies (includingnatural gas and CCS).The continued development of renewables requires strategic vision and investment ininfrastructure and technology: most obviously, smart grid and energy storage. However, newgeneration biofuels technology is needed to kickstart this segment of the renewables market.The move toward the next generation of technologies is unlikely to be possible without strongsignals from states and governments that they will be supported.Your key questions answered•Where are renewables now in the overall energy mix and how is this reflected by region and by country?•What are the long-term prospects for renewables and which are expected to see the most significant growth over the next decades?
  • 2. •What are the principal policy and investment issues?•What are the key technological and structural obstacles to renewables implementation?•What changes need to be put in place at government level to ensure continuing renewables success?Get your copy of this report @http://www.reportsnreports.com/reports/194886-maintaining-growth-in-the-renewables-sector.htmlMajor points covered in Table of Contents of this report includeTable of ContentsAbout the authorsProfessor Merlin StoneJane Fae OzimekDisclaimerEXECUTIVE SUMMARYRenewables: global situation and trendsRenewables outlook: long-termFactors leading to growth in renewablesSlowing renewables growthAnalysis and recommendationsReport outlineScope and introductionRenewables: global situation and trendsRenewables in the global mixBreakdown by modalityBreakdown by energy sourceRenewables: national trendsComparison of renewables within countryOver 60% renewable electricitySplit by end user: generation and useEnergy usage: consumer versus businessRenewable energy in the business sectorFuture growth expectedConsumer case study: GermanyRenewables outlookLong-term outlookLikely future renewables mixFactors leading to growth in renewablesThe changing model of energy generationCost base for renewable generationRenewables versus traditional fuelsIEA exploration of relevant factors
  • 3. National policies support renewable growthInvestment in renewable technologiesNational targets for renewable energyFinancial support for renewable technologiesSlowing renewables growthPutting the brakes on renewablesFinancial difficultiesDeclining subsidy versus unclear policyTechnology issuesStructural issues: baseload and dispatchable energySolutions: smart grid and storageFossil fuel back-upGermany – a study in renewable implementationBalancing renewable incentive against fossil fuel back-upAlternative (non-renewable) solutionsNatural gas – a cleaner alternative?Shale gas – savior or false prophetShale gas trendsEnvironmental issues associated with shale gas extractionNatural gas alternatives: a critiqueThe nuclear optionFuture expansion for nuclearNuclear controversyCCS – a cleaner approach to fossil fuels?Carbon scrubbingAnalysis and recommendationsChanging perspectives on renewables: 2012–30Time to disaggregate renewablesThe need for a co-ordinated energy strategyAppendixGlossary/abbreviationsBibliography/referencesList of TablesTable: World total primary energy supply and relative change, by fuel (Mtoe), 2007 and 2009Table: Proportion of EU energy requirements provided by renewables (%), 2006–09Table: Renewable energy estimated share of global final consumption and relative change (%),2008 and 2010Table: Estimated renewable share of global electricity generation and relative change (%), 2008and 2011Table: Renewable generating capacity: selected indicators, 2009–11Table: Total energy production by regions: renewable share and change, 2010 versus 2005Table: Share of renewable energy in gross final energy consumption (%), 2009 and 2010 plus EU
  • 4. targets for 2020Table: Electricity generated from renewable sources (% of gross electricity consumption), 2009and 2010Table: Proportion of renewable energy primary production by country from biomass, hydro,geothermal, wind, and solar energy (%), 2010Table: Total world delivered energy consumption, by end-use sector (quadrillion Btu), 2008Table: World total energy consumption, by fuel (quadrillion Btu), 2008–35Table: Total installed generating capacity and renewables capacity (GW), 2008–35Table: Actual and forecast net electricity generation, by renewables (billion kWh), 2008–35Table: Regional variation in levelized cost of new generation resources, US ($/MWh), 2017Table: Leading nations by renewable technology (GW), end 2011Table: World annual investment in new renewable capacity ($bn), 2009–11Table: Number of countries with renewable targets and renewable support policies, 2009–11Table: Countries generating the largest proportion of their electricity from nuclear (%), 2011List of FiguresFigure: World total primary energy supply, by fuel (Mtoe), 2007 and 2009Figure: Proportion of EU energy requirements provided by renewables (%), 2006–09Figure: Renewable energy estimated share of global final consumption (%), 2008 and 2010Figure: Estimated renewable share of global electricity generation (%), 2008 and end 2011Figure: Renewable generating capacity: hydropower versus other renewables, 2009–11Figure: Change in renewable share of energy use by regions (%), 2010 versus 2005Figure: Share of renewable energy in gross final energy consumption (%), 2010Figure: Electricity generated from renewable sources (% of gross electricity consumption), 2009and 2010Figure: Proportion of renewable energy primary production from hydro energy, by country (%),2010Figure: Total world delivered energy consumption, by end-use sector (quadrillion Btu), 2008Figure: World total energy consumption, by fuel (quadrillion Btu), 2008–35Figure: Renewables as a proportion of total installed generating capacity (%), 2008–35Figure: Actual and forecast net electricity generation, by renewables (billion kWh), 2008–35Figure: Virtuous circle of renewables support, 2012Figure: Average levelized cost of new generation resources ($/MWh), 2017Figure: World annual investment in new renewable capacity ($bn), 2009–11Figure: Number of countries with renewable policy targets, 2009–11Figure: Share of renewable energy in gross final consumption (%), EU target for 2020Contact: sales@reportsandreports.com for more information.

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