Asia - Fixed Telecommunications Infrastructure
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Asia - Fixed Telecommunications Infrastructure Document Transcript

  • 1. Asia - Fixed Telecommunications InfrastructureReport Details:Published:August 2012No. of Pages: 252Price: Single User License – US$1500The Asian market has been continuing its long run of overall strong growth and to support thisthere has obviously been a correspondingly strong development of infrastructure. This report looksat the fixed telecoms infrastructure in a broad selection of markets – both developed anddeveloping – right across the region. Markets covered include:Afghanistan, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Brunei Darussalam, Cambodia, China,East Timor, Georgia, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Laos, Macau,Malaysia, Maldives, Mongolia, Myanmar (Burma), Nepal, North Korea, Pakistan, Philippines,Singapore, South Korea, Sri Lanka, Taiwan, Tajikistan, Thailand, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan,Vietnam.Executive Summary:Asia’s fixed infrastructure underpins its booming mobile and broadband sectorsThe governmentsof Asian nations have long recognised – some earlier than others – that there needed to be someencouragement of private sector investment to meet the demand for the all-important capitalneeded in the telecom sector. At the same time, it was also generally well recognised that thisstrategy could not rely on local investment alone, and would inevitably mean a substantial level offoreign investment. Of course, despite this recognition, there has inevitably been some resistancewithin governments to opening up the telecom sector to foreign investors and as a consequencethe level of ‘encouragement’ has been variable.The changing nature of the telecom market has also had a major impact on the approach toinvestment in infrastructure. With shifting revenue patterns across the market segments and fallingARPUs on many services, operators have been more selective about what they actually invest in.Telecom operators throughout Asia have been increasing investment levels on the back ofcarefully considered investment strategies. This has seen companies shifting business focus,looking for new ways to add value to existing revenue streams; it has also seen a strong desire toleverage new value from infrastructure that is already in place. This has especially been the casewith mobile network moving increasingly to support mobile broadband services and newergenerations of mobile technologies.The initial round of substantial investment in telecom infrastructure in Asia was in fixed telephonenetworks. Over a number of decades the regional economies were progressively building theiroften quite substantial fixed-line national networks. These fixed networks were in time followed bythe building of mobile networks. In many of the developing nations of the region, the building of
  • 2. fixed-line infrastructure was not far advanced before it was overwhelmed by the introduction ofmobile infrastructure. This created the phenomenon of ‘substitution’ in many of the markets of Asia(where mobile services perform the function of the non-existent fixed services.) Nevertheless,despite the unevenness in disposition, fixed infrastructure remained an important component inthe overall development of the region’s telecom sector. Coming into 2012 there were around 580million fixed-line subscribers in Asia; this compared with close to 3 billion mobile subscribers. Mostimportantly, the fixed-line numbers have only been increasing marginally in recent years, with asignificant number of countries in Asia starting to see a decline in fixed-line numbers.The focus of infrastructure building has been shifting. There has been a major push to upgradedomestic telecoms networks to Next Generation Networks (NGNs). This process is seeing largescale investment by Asia’s leading telecoms markets in new-generation IP-basedtelecommunications networks. At the same time there has been a major surge in infrastructurebuilding as mostly developed economies roll out National Broadband Networks (NBNs). Thesenetworks come in various ‘shapes and sizes’ as governments work with operators to tackle thestrategic challenge of delivering high speed to the nation. Not surprisingly the NBNs rely heavilyupon fibre; in some cases it is Fibre to the Premises (FttP), while in others it might be Fibre to theNode (FttN). And the cost varies accordingly. Those countries that have government backing forNBN roll-out are the ones that are setting the pace.In addition to the national networks, international connectivity remains central to the overalleffectiveness of the region’s telecommunications services. Submarine cable routes criss-cross theAsia Pacific area, providing both intra-regional and inter-regional networks. This sector of themarket has been characterised by widely fluctuating supply and demand, which in turn has seensomewhat erratic investment strategies. . Submarine projects are subject to this boom and bustmarket phenomena, with planned projects commonly being delayed or abandoned, consortiabeing reshaped, etc. In fact, over-supply of capacity has been common in the Asian market. Morerecently investments have been less speculative and more focused on predicted growth. In themeantime, new submarine cable projects continue being proposed and the cables installedthroughout the region. As Asia’s broadband usage surged, a major effort has gone into managingthe shortfall in capacity between Asia and the US.As the demand for wholesale services continues to rise in Asia, still driven in the short term byvoice, but in the longer term by data, there has been a boom in IP-based services, with the volumeof international Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) traffic into and out of Asia having increased ata rapid rate at the expense of the traditional International Direct Dial (IDD) traffic. The industry willwatch closely to see how this settles into a pattern of more predictable growth in demand.Asia – key developments in infrastructure•Asia’s networks and infrastructure supported a total of more than 3.5 billion telephone subscribers coming into 2012; of these, an estimated 580 million were fixed-line subscribers and 2.9 billion were mobile subscribers;•Asia’s developed markets had built or were building their NGNs, with IP shaping as the primary delivery platform for telecom services across the region;•After annual growth of 20%-30% in the region’s mobile market during the 2005/2010 period, 2011 saw growth fall to around 10%, with looking likely to continue for the next few years;
  • 3. •Most tellingly, coming into 2012 Asia claimed 49% of the world’s total mobile subscriber base;•In the meantime, the operators were expanding infrastructure to support their still growing subscriber bases and usage patterns, and especially the push into mobile broadband;•By early 2012 Asia had a mobile broadband penetration of 11%; this represented 460 million mobile broadband subscribers in the region;•Two of Asia’s markets – South Korea and Singapore – had more mobile broadband subscribers than population by end 2011; Japan was not far behind on 90% mobile broadband penetration at the time;•While mobile broadband was expanding rapidly, fixed (wired) broadband remained a key component of the infrastructure in Asia; in 2011 30 million fixed (wired) broadband subscriptions were added in China alone, this being about half of total such subscribers added worldwide;•Asia’s all-important submarine cable market continues to attract interest from investors anticipating an increased demand for bandwidth that will put pressure on capacity;•With a series of system outages drawing attention to the highly vulnerable nature of these key systems, redundancy has become a critical issue for submarine cable systems in the region and provides further incentive for investment in this type of infrastructure;•The region continues to see a steady run of new satellite launches with further such launches already scheduled for the coming year or two.Get your copy of this report @http://www.reportsnreports.com/reports/190023-asia-fixed-telecommunications-infrastructure.htmlMajor points covered in Table of Contents of this report include1. Afghanistan1.1 Infrastructure overview1.1.1 Background1.1.2 Post-20011.2 National infrastructure network1.2.1 Forecasts – fixed-line market – 2015; 20201.2.2 Local Fixed Services Plan (LFSP)1.2.3 Optical fibre backbone1.2.4 Satellite services1.2.5 Infrastructure projects2. Armenia2.1 National infrastructure2.2 International infrastructure3. Azerbaijan3.1 National infrastructure3.1.1 Overview3.1.2 Next Generation Network (NGN)3.1.3 Forecasts – fixed-line market – 2015; 2020
  • 4. 3.2 International infrastructure3.2.1 Trans-Asia-Europe (TAE) cable network3.2.2 Europe Persia Express Gateway (EPEG)4. Bangladesh4.1 National infrastructure4.1.1 Overview4.1.2 Fibre optic networks4.1.3 Grameen Telecom’s Village Project4.1.4 Forecasts – fixed-line market – 2015; 20204.2 International infrastructure4.2.1 International Gateways4.2.2 Satellite networks4.2.3 Submarine cable connectivity5. Bhutan5.1 National infrastructure5.1.1 Overview5.1.2 E-Shabtog5.1.3 Remote communities5.1.4 Optical fibre network5.2 International infrastructure5.2.1 Overview5.2.2 Very Small Aperture Terminals (VSATs)6. Brunei Darussalam6.1 National infrastructure6.1.1 Overview6.1.2 Telecommunications development project6.1.3 Public payphones6.1.4 GSM payphones6.1.5 Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP)6.1.6 Next Generation Networks (NGN)6.2 International infrastructure6.2.1 Trans-Borneo Optical Cable Network6.2.2 Submarine cable networks6.2.3 Satellite networks7. Cambodia7.1 National infrastructure7.1.1 Overview7.1.2 Forecasts – fixed-line market – 2015; 20207.1.3 Telecom Cambodia7.2 International infrastructure7.2.1 Overview7.2.2 Greater Mekong Subregion Information Superhighway (GMS-IS)
  • 5. 8. China8.1 National infrastructure8.1.1 Overview8.1.2 Internet networks8.1.3 Fibre-to-the-home (FttH)8.2 International infrastructure8.2.1 Terrestrial and submarine cable infrastructure8.2.2 China-USA undersea cable link8.2.3 China-Vietnam undersea cable link8.2.4 China-Taiwan undersea cable link8.2.5 China-India terrestrial cable link8.2.6 Satellite infrastructure9. Georgia9.1 National infrastructure9.1.1 Overview9.1.2 Wireless local loop (WLL)9.1.3 Forecasts – fixed-line subscribers – 2015; 20209.2 International infrastructure9.2.1 Satellites10. Hong Kong10.1 National infrastructure10.1.1 Digital 21 IT Strategy10.1.2 FttB/FttH building registration scheme10.2 International infrastructure10.2.1 Submarine cable networks11. India11.1 National infrastructure11.1.1 Overview11.1.2 Statistics11.1.3 Forecasts - fixed-line services – 2015; 202011.1.4 Network development11.1.5 Infrastructure sharing11.1.6 Rural and regional networks11.1.7 Fibre optic cable projects11.1.8 Wireless Local Loop (WLL)11.1.9 IP networks11.1.10 Next Generation Networks (NGN)11.2 International infrastructure11.2.1 Background11.2.2 Interconnect agreements11.2.3 India-Pakistan11.2.4 International service disruption
  • 6. 11.2.5 Submarine cable networks11.2.6 Satellite communications12. Indonesia12.1 National infrastructure12.1.1 Overview12.1.2 Background to development12.1.3 Fixed-line statistics12.1.4 Forecasts – fixed-line market: 2015; 202012.1.5 Infrastructure development12.1.6 Joint operating service (KSO) ventures – five-zone plan12.1.7 Rural telephony12.1.8 Wireless Local Loop (WLL)12.1.9 Telecom towers12.2 International infrastructure12.2.1 International gateway exchanges12.2.2 Submarine cable networks12.2.3 Satellite networks13. Japan13.1 National infrastructure13.1.1 Overview13.1.2 Stimulus package for ICT infrastructure13.1.3 Fixed-network market13.1.4 High-speed fibre13.1.5 Earthquake damage: March 201113.1.6 Internet exchange points13.2 International infrastructure13.2.1 Overview13.2.2 Submarine cables13.2.3 Satellite14. Kazakhstan14.1 National infrastructure14.1.1 Overview14.1.2 Forecasts – fixed-line market – 2015; 202014.1.3 IP-based services14.1.4 Next Generation Network (NGN) development14.1.5 Wireless Local Loop (WLL)14.2 International infrastructure14.2.1 Trans Asia-Europe (TAE)14.2.2 Satellite networks14.2.3 KazSat satellite series15. Kyrgyzstan15.1 National infrastructure
  • 7. 15.1.1 Overview15.2 International infrastructure15.2.1 Satellites15.2.2 Optical fibre cable systems16. Laos16.1 National infrastructure16.1.1 Overview16.1.2 Fixed-line statistics16.1.3 Forecasts – fixed-line market - 2015; 202016.2 International infrastructure16.2.1 Terrestrial cable links16.2.2 Asian Development Bank Backbone Telecommunications Network16.2.3 Proposed satellite system17. Macau17.1 National and international infrastructure18. Malaysia18.1 National infrastructure18.1.1 Overview18.1.2 Fixed-line networks18.1.3 Forecasts – fixed-line subscribers – 2015; 202018.1.4 Sharing of infrastructure18.1.5 Fibre optic backbones18.1.6 Next Generation Networks (NGNs)18.1.7 High-Speed Broadband (HSBB) network18.2 International infrastructure18.2.1 International gateways18.2.2 Malaysia-Thailand18.2.3 Submarine cable networks18.2.4 Proposed submarine cable networks18.2.5 Satellite networks19. Maldives19.1 National infrastructure19.1.1 Overview19.1.2 Domestic satellite service19.2 International infrastructure19.2.1 Satellite networks19.2.2 Submarine cable networks20. Mongolia20.1 National infrastructure20.1.1 Overview20.1.2 Rural services20.2 International infrastructure
  • 8. 20.2.1 Overview20.2.2 Satellite program20.2.3 Chronological data of ICT developments in Mongolia21. Myanmar (Burma)21.1 National infrastructure21.1.1 Overview21.1.2 Wireless Local Loop (WLL)21.2 International infrastructure21.2.1 Overview21.2.2 Satellite networks22. Nepal22.1 National infrastructure22.1.1 Overview22.1.2 Forecasts – fixed-line market – 2015; 202022.1.3 Nepal East West SDH project22.1.4 Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP)22.2 International infrastructure22.2.1 Overview23. North Korea23.1 National infrastructure23.1.1 Overview23.1.2 North-South connections23.2 International infrastructure23.2.1 Overview23.2.2 Satellite networks24. Pakistan24.1 National infrastructure24.1.1 Overview24.1.2 Fixed line statistics24.1.3 Forecast – fixed line market – 2015; 202024.1.4 Opening up of market24.1.5 Rural services24.1.6 Universal Service Fund (USF)24.1.7 Fibre optic networks24.1.8 Broadband networks24.1.9 Wireless Local Loop (WLL)24.1.10 Next Generation Networks (NGNs)24.1.11 Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP)24.2 International infrastructure24.2.1 International gateways24.2.2 Pakistan-India link24.2.3 Submarine cable networks
  • 9. 24.2.4 Satellite networks and systems25. Philippines25.1 National infrastructure25.1.1 Overview25.1.2 Fixed-line statistics25.1.3 Forecasts – fixed-line market – 2015; 202025.1.4 Globe Telecom’s national fixed-line licence25.1.5 Background: Service Area Scheme (SAS)25.1.6 National fibre optic networks25.1.7 Next Generation Networks (NGNs)25.1.8 Wireless Local Loop (WLL)25.1.9 Very Small Aperture Terminal (VSAT) services25.2 International infrastructure25.2.1 International gateways25.2.2 Submarine cable networks25.2.3 Satellite systems26. Singapore26.1 National infrastructure26.1.1 Overview26.1.2 Fixed-mobile convergence (FMC)26.1.3 Next Generation National Infocomm Infrastructure (Next Gen NII)26.1.4 Analysis – Singapore’s national broadband network26.1.5 Infrastructure developments26.2 International infrastructure26.2.1 Submarine cable networks26.2.2 Submarine cable systems under construction26.2.3 Satellite networks27. South Korea27.1 National infrastructure27.1.1 National submarine cable infrastructure27.1.2 National satellite infrastructure27.1.3 Internet infrastructure27.1.4 Smart cities27.2 International infrastructure27.2.1 Submarine cable infrastructure28. Sri Lanka28.1 National infrastructure28.1.1 Fixed infrastructure28.1.2 Overview28.1.3 Forecasts – fixed-line market – 2015; 202028.1.4 Infrastructure development28.1.5 Wireless Local Loop (WLL)
  • 10. 28.1.6 Fibre optic networks28.1.7 National Backbone Network (NBN)28.1.8 Payphones28.1.9 Numbering plan28.1.10 Internet Protocol (IP) networks28.1.11 Rural communications28.2 International infrastructure28.2.1 Submarine cables29. Taiwan29.1 National infrastructure29.1.1 Government initiatives for broadband and m-Taiwan29.1.2 Fibre-to-the-Home (FttH)29.2 International infrastructure29.2.1 Submarine cable networks29.2.2 Satellite networks30. Tajikistan30.1 National and international infrastructure30.1.1 Overview30.1.2 Next Generation Networks (NGNs)31. Thailand31.1 National infrastructure31.1.1 Overview31.1.2 Background31.1.3 Forecasts – fixed-line subscribers – 2015; 202031.1.4 Public payphones31.1.5 Next Generation Network (NGN)31.2 International infrastructure31.2.1 Overview31.2.2 Submarine cable networks31.2.3 Submarine cable systems under construction or proposed31.2.4 Submarine cable outages31.2.5 Satellite networks32. Timor Leste32.1 National infrastructure32.1.1 Overview32.2 International infrastructure32.2.1 Overview32.2.2 Satellite networks32.2.3 Submarine cable33. Turkmenistan33.1 National and international infrastructure33.1.1 Overview
  • 11. 33.1.2 Fibre optic networks34. Uzbekistan34.1 National infrastructure34.1.1 Overview34.1.2 Forecasts – fixed-line market – 2015; 202034.1.3 Fibre optic cables34.2 International infrastructure34.2.1 Satellite communications35. Vietnam35.1 National infrastructure35.1.1 Overview35.1.2 Background to development35.1.3 Next Generation Networks (NGNs)35.1.4 Wireless Local Loop (WLL)35.1.5 Forecasts – fixed-line market – 2015; 202035.1.6 National infrastructure projects and equitisation35.2 International infrastructure35.2.1 Background to development35.2.2 Submarine cable networks35.2.3 Satellite networks36. Glossary of AbbreviationsTable 1 – Fixed-line subscribers and teledensity – 1994; 2000 - 2012Table 2 – Fixed-line subscribers - 2011Table 3 – Forecast fixed-line subscribers – 2015; 2020Table 4 – Fixed lines in service and teledensity – 1991 - 2012Table 5 – Fixed lines in service, annual growth and teledensity – 1995 - 2012Table 6 – Forecast fixed-line subscribers – 2015; 2020Table 7 – Fixed lines in service and teledensity – 1995 - 2012Table 8 – Bangladesh optical fibre network - 2011Table 9 – Village Phones in Bangladesh – 1998 – 2007; 2010 - 2011Table 10 – Forecast fixed line subscribers – 2015; 2020Table 11 – Fixed lines in service and teledensity – 1995 - 2012Table 12 – Fixed line subscribers and penetration rate – 1990; 1995; 2000 - 2012Table 13 – Fixed lines in service – 1995 - 2012Table 14 – Forecast fixed-line growth – 2015; 2020Table 15 – China main indicators of telecommunications capacity – 2009 - 2011Table 16 – China total international outlet bandwidth: 2006 - 2011Table 17 – International outlet bandwidth for key networks – 2004 – 2011Table 18 – IPv4 address resources in China and annual change – 2005 - 2011Table 19 – Total domain names in China and annual change – 2005 - 2011Table 20 – Classified domain names in China – 2009; 2011Table 21 – Classified .cn domain names – 2009 - 2010
  • 12. Table 22 – Growth of websites in China and annual change – 2002 – 2011Table 23 – Growth of web pages in China and annual change – 2006 - 2011Table 24 – FttX subscribers – 2006 - 2012Table 25 – Fixed lines in service, annual change and penetration – 1995 - 2012Table 26 – Fixed-line operators – subscribers and market share – 2010Table 27 – Forecast fixed line subscribers – 2015; 2020Table 28 – Digital 21 Strategy – key indicators – June 2012Table 29 – External telecommunications facilities capacity of Hong Kong – 2000 - 2012Table 30 – Fixed-line subscribers and teledensity – 2005 - 2012Table 31 – Fixed-line subscribers and teledensity (historical) – 1995 - 2005Table 32 – Forecast fixed line subscribers and penetration rates – 2015; 2020Table 33 – Growth of VPT scheme – 2001 - 2011Table 34 – PCOs in operation – 2003 - 2011Table 35 – PCOs in operation and market share by operator – September 2011Table 36 – Fixed WLL subscribers (historical) – 2004 - 2006Table 37 – Fixed-line subscribers and teledensity – 1995 - 2012Table 38 – Fixed lines subscribers and annual change by operator – 2011Table 39 – Fixed wireless v. wireline subscribers – 2011Table 40 – Forecast of fixed line subscribers and penetration rates – 2015; 2020Table 41 – Planned five-year USO deployment of lines for villages – 2006 - 2010Table 42 – Fixed-wireless (WLL) subscribers – 2003; 2007 - 2011Table 43 – Fixed-wireless (WLL) subscribers by operator – 2011Table 44 – PT Telkom’s fixed wireless subscribers – 2003 - 2011Table 45 – PT Telkom – fixed wireless subscribers – 2010Table 46 – MYLINE subscribers – 2002 - 2012Table 47 – MYLINE operator market share – February 2012Table 48 – International internet bandwidth – 1995 - 2010Table 49 – Fixed lines in service and teledensity – 1995 - 2012Table 50 – Forecast fixed line subscribers and penetration rates – 2015; 2020Table 51 – Fixed lines in service, annual change and teledensity – 1991 - 2012Table 52 – Fixed lines in service – 1995 - 2012Table 53 – WLL (fixed) subscribers – 2004 - 2012Table 54 – Forecast fixed line subscribers and penetration rates – 2015; 2020Table 55 – Fixed-lines and teledensity – 1985 - 2013Table 56 – Fixed lines in service and teledensity – 1995 - 2012Table 57 – Fixed-line household penetration rate – 2000 - 2012Table 58 – Forecast fixed-line subscribers – 2015; 2020Table 59 – Fixed lines in service and teledensity – 1995 - 2012Table 60 – Fixed-line subscribers by region – September 2011Table 61 – Fixed lines in service and teledensity – 1990, 1995 – 2013Table 62 – Local fixed-line telephone traffic – 1997 – 2009Table 63 – Wireless local loop (WLL) lines in service – 2003 – 2011
  • 13. Table 64 – L and S band usage – July 2012Table 65 – C band usage – July 2012Table 66 – Ku band usage – July 2012Table 67 – Fixed lines in service – 1988, 1990, 1995 - 2012Table 68 – Fixed-lines in service and teledensity – 1995 - 2012Table 69 – Fixed WLL subscribers – 2006 - 2011Table 70 – Forecast fixed line subscribers – 2015; 2020Table 71 – Fixed lines in service and teledensity – 1990; 2000; 2005; 2010Table 72 – Fixed lines in service and teledensity – 1991 - 2012Table 73 – Fixed wireline subscribers – 2004 - 2011Table 74 – Fixed wireline v. fixed wireless (WLL) subscribers – 2004 - 2012Table 75 – Fixed wireline subscribers by operator and market share –2011Table 76 – Forecast fixed line subscribers – 2015; 2020Table 77 – WLL subscribers – 2005 - 2012Table 78 – WLL subscribers by operator and market share – March 2012Table 79 – Fixed lines in service and penetration – 1994 - 2012Table 80 – Fixed lines – proportion of urban and residential subscribers – 2007 - 2011Table 81 – Fixed lines installed versus lines in operation – 1995 - 2011Table 82 – Total SAS lines installed by operators by target dateTable 83 – Forecast fixed line subscribers – 2015; 2020Table 84 – Fixed lines in service and penetration – 1998 - 2012Table 85 – Overview of fixed-line subscribers – 2011Table 86 – Registered .kr domains – 1993 - 2012Table 87 – Number of IPv4 and IPv6 addresses – 1997 - 2012Table 88 – International bandwidth – 1997 - 2010Table 89 – Fixed lines in service, annual change and teledensity – 1995 - 2012Table 90 – Forecast fixed line subscribers and penetration rate – 2015; 2020Table 91 – WLL subscribers – 1996 - 2012Table 92 – Fixed lines in service, annual growth and teledensity – 1995 - 2012Table 93 – Fixed lines and teledensity – 1995 - 2012Table 94 – Estimated fixed-line subscribers by operator – 2011Table 95 – Estimated fixed-line subscribers – metro vs provincial – 2011Table 96 – Forecast fixed-line subscribers and penetration rate – 2015; 2020Table 97 – Public payphones in service – 2004 - 2011Table 98 – Public payphones by provider – 2011Table 99 – Fixed line subscribers, annual change and penetration – 1995; 1998 - 2000; 2003 -2012Table 100 – Fixed lines in service and teledensity – 1991 - 2012Table 101 – Fixed lines in service, annual growth and teledensity – 1991 - 2012Table 102 – Forecast fixed-line subscribers and penetration rates – 2015; 2020Table 103 – Fixed lines in service and teledensity – 1990 - 2012Table 104 – Forecast fixed line subscribers and penetration rates – 2015; 2020
  • 14. Chart 1 – Fixed lines in service and teledensity – 2001 - 2012Chart 2 – Bangladesh fixed-line subscribers and penetration - 2001 - 2012Chart 3 – China total international outlet bandwidth – 2006 - 2011Chart 4 – IPv4 address resources in China and annual change– 2006 - 2011Chart 5 – Websites in China and annual change– 2002 - 2011Chart 6 – Web pages in China and annual change– 2006 - 2011Chart 7 – Fixed and mobile subscribers in Georgia – 2000 - 2011Chart 8 - Fixed-line subscribers and teledensity – 2005 - 2012Chart 9 - Fixed-line subscribers and teledensity (historical) – 1995 - 2005Chart 10 - Fixed-line subscribers and teledensity – 1995 - 2012Chart 11 – International bandwidth – 2005 - 2010Chart 12: Fixed and mobile subscribers: 2000 - 2013Chart 13 - Fixed lines in service and teledensity - 2000 – 2012(e)Chart 14 – Fixed lines in service and teledensity- 1998 – 2013Chart 15 – Fixed and mobile subscribers – 1999 - 2010Chart 16 - Fixed lines in service, annual growth and teledensity – 2001 - 2012Chart 17 – Fixed line subscribers and annual change – 2001 - 2012Exhibit 1 – Major submarine cables with landing points in Brunei - 2011Exhibit 2 – Regional/international fibre optic cable networksExhibit 3 – Selected Chinese satellite service providers and satellitesExhibit 4 – China Satcom satellite fleetExhibit 5 – Major submarine cables with landing points in Hong Kong – 2012Exhibit 6 – International submarine cable systems with landing points in India - 2011Exhibit 7 – ISRO satellite network – May 2011Exhibit 8 – Palapa Ring Project – specification of ringsExhibit 9 – Indonesian satellites – 2011Exhibit 10 – Major members of MYLINE Carriers Association – February 2012Exhibit 11 – Major global/regional submarine cables with landing point in Japan - 2010Exhibit 12 – Construction of the National Information Highway (NIH) backboneExhibit 13 – International submarine cable systems with landing points in Malaysia - 2011Exhibit 14 – Chronological events of ICT developments in Mongolia: 1921 – 2011Exhibit 15 – Major submarine cables with landing points in the Philippines - 2011Exhibit 16 – Structure of National Broadband NetworkExhibit 17 – International submarine cable systems with landing points in Singapore – 2011Exhibit 18 – National submarine fibre optic cables overview in South KoreaExhibit 19 – KOREASAT satellite statusExhibit 20 – Interconnection status by IX - 2011Exhibit 21 – International submarine fibre optic cables overview in South KoreaExhibit 22 – Major global/regional submarine cables with landing point in Taiwan – 2011Exhibit 23 – Submarine cable networks - 2011Exhibit 24 – Thaicom’s satellite network – 2011
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