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Getting to the Repository of the Future Workshop
 

Getting to the Repository of the Future Workshop

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Slides from the Getting to the Repository of the Future Workshop held on Wednesday 31st July 2013 at Repository Fringe 2013. The workshop was led by Chris Awre, University of Hull, and Balviar Notay, ...

Slides from the Getting to the Repository of the Future Workshop held on Wednesday 31st July 2013 at Repository Fringe 2013. The workshop was led by Chris Awre, University of Hull, and Balviar Notay, JISC.

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  • Since 2002 to now – have grown a repository infrastructure. 200 repositories Exploratory, Building Capacity, Enhancements, Rapid Innovation, Deposit, Recent focus on efficiency and sustainability of national shared services (Sherpa RoMEO, IRUS, RJB) - (RepNet) The repository is now being seen to play a central role in the management of a university ’ s digital assets, including research papers, data and learning materials and it is seen as a response to competitive demands to attract students and research funds, and to national and international policy requirements. Our strategic planning in this area needs to keep abreast of drivers, rapid advances in technologies and academic practices. More recently, a number of policy drivers in the uk such as research funders ’ policies on Open Access and research data, the UK Government ’ s White Paper on Data , and the funding councils ’   learning strategies and Research Excellence Framework have recognised the value of curating, reporting/measuring and sharing these assets.  Finch – Instrumental in forwarding the OA agenda. It ’s been a Game changer in the UK. Altho many interpreted Finch as saying gold and no need for repositories this wasn ’ t what was meant – underneath it was a recognition that repositories wld have a role for supplementary materials, changing models of scholarship & the transition to gold OA would require repositories to take a part. G8 summit - all G8 nations – signing up to Open Access to Peer reviewed published research and research data E.g. FASTR. – The Fair access to Science and Technology Act – introduced
  • Exploratory FAIR Programme 2002 – this really was about seeing what could be done with OAI-PMH – various projects looking at institutional resources, museum resources and scoping services such as Sherpa and Romeo   Building capacity – Start-Up repositories funding 33 project – this was facilitating institutions building their repository from scratch.   Enhancement – 33 - seeing what services/tools could be built on top (SNEEP) – social networking extensions for ePrints     rapid innovation 2009 – 41 projects – small, short term funding – Walking Through Time project – mobile app that allows allow architectural historians, conservationists and tourists to download historical maps when standing in a specific location, to annotate and tag these maps and to record and follow routes through historical space Students were interested in walking through real space whilst following a map from say 200 years ago - and being able to tag locations and overlay related data that offers historical and contextual information. PRONOM - A technical registry for file formats DROID - : An automatic file format identification & characterisation tool. JHOVE - : An identification, characterisation and validation tool NZ Metadata Extractor : programmatically extracts preservation metadata from a range of file formats
  • Slide courtersey od Azhar Hussain from Sherpa Services OpenDOAR. This graph maps IR growth from 2005 to 2012, notice the step, which is due to initial addition of records, after which we see steady growth … It is safe to say that this graph shows significant growth …… Timely to assess where we are going (given changes in our policy environment)
  • University of Hull Repository (Hydra) Wanted adaptability in user interfaces and workflows to handle specific content Worked US Fedora users, Stanford Uni and Virginia Tech to create the Hydra framework – to enable multiple points of access to a single body of content in a repository Now have a flexible repository infrastructure that can handle emerging research data Ahead in preparing the ground for data with a single repository solution. This is different to somewhere like Lincoln who have used CKAN for there research data management solution (dedicated data repos) linking with their publications repository. Another pioneering example – development called PURR at university of PURDUE in Indiana. Have developed a data solution supports creating of data management plans (at point od proposal writing) – collaboration environment, supports publishing of data with DOIs, Archives data. Can search publications and data from the system.
  • Kulture developed ePrints plugin for arts based repositories Kultivate was a community approach to increasing uptate of the plugin and improve deposit (also updating the kulture ePrints plugin) – 40 institutions were involved in the consultation and workshops. (Community discussed Metadata issues, it was not about just dealing with mulimedia images, music video, but how to also document and curate exhibitions, performances and reviews. How to deal with packaging formats, REF submissions (determining what is included and how to get this information out in a standard way) eNova – mePrints enhancements – to researcher profiles – more visual researcher profile page. Creative arts repositories have enabled not only contextual researchers, but importantly practitioner based researchers, to develop and make public portfolios of their work, thereby increasing access to, and understanding of, creative arts research, and raising its potential impact upon the wider world.
  • MSc and research students understood 3D images more thoroughly than before, especially for those who were new to medical images and medical anatomy. Similarly, for the teaching staff, preparation of teaching materials are much easier without the need to draw 3D diagrams for elaborating 3D images. The MIRAGE project has also enhanced the research activity of the project team, paving the way for the further development. For example, the project leader, Dr. Gao, has been awarded over €400,000 by EC under FP7 programme on the follow up project WIDTH (Warehousing images in the digital hospital, 2011-2014).
  • Even though our infrastructure is relatively mature, it is still evolving. We are now are at a point where it seems timely to assess emerging strategic requirements and the role and value of the repository to the institution in meeting them.  How do we ensure that our development plans will meet future demands? I will stress that today is not just about OA and scholarly communications but about the value and impact of all types of content.  Aims of the day is to get your input to trends, pioneering examples and possible futures to jointly support strategic planning.
  • Rachel Botsman – Speaking at the WIRED Money financial event. She is teaching business and Governments how to make use of a “what’s mine is yours” philosophy that is changing the shape of our economy. Technology is transforming our relationship to assets and ownership – Bruce Willis is currently trying to find a way of adding his extensive iTunes library to his will to his children – which is not currently possible – even though he has paid for them. In the future we could see the emergence of peer to peer mortgage companies (Banks may not necessarily be needed in the equation) Quote: “The sharing economy… We can definitely see a really strong role for the repository as part of the edges…

Getting to the Repository of the Future Workshop Getting to the Repository of the Future Workshop Presentation Transcript

  • Getting to the Repository of the Future Chris Awre Balviar Notay Repository Fringe Jisc Workshop: Getting to the Repository of the Future
  • Context, Background and Aims of the Day Repository Fringe Jisc Workshop: Getting to the Repository of the Future
  • • Since 2002 the UK has grown a repository infrastructure • Now over 200 in operation • Repositories are playing an increasingly central role in the management of a university’s digital assets (including research papers, data, learning materials, etc.) • Recent focus: efficiency and sustainability of national shared services (Sherpa RoMEO/JULIET, IRUS, RJB) • Many component parts are in place • Where do we go from here? Background and Context Repository Fringe Jisc Workshop: Getting to the Repository of the Future
  • Repository Fringe Jisc Workshop: Getting to the Repository of the Future • Two views • High level • Institutions need to be responsive to competitive demands to attract research funds and students, and must also meet national and international policy requirements. • Strategic planning needs to keep abreast of policy drivers, rapid advances in technologies and academic practices (RCUK Policy on OA, Finch Report, Funding Councils’ Learning Strategies G8, FASTR, HEFCE REF policy, etc.)
  • • On the ground • Repository systems have been with us for over 10 years • Are they still the right systems? • Are they enabling the management of the content we need to curate? • What other options exist? • What impact will repositories have on staffing, skill requirements, etc.? • What scale of operation can we manage? How? • Focus today is on the repositories themselves and how we address the issues these two views raise Repository Fringe Jisc Workshop: Getting to the Repository of the Future
  • • Further the sector’s understanding of the costs and value that flow from the digital assets of universities • Start to shape new futures for repositories • Work together – inform how we move forward in the UK (whilst acknowledging global picture) • Develop sector wide perspective • Requires your participation and ideas Aims and Objectives Repository Fringe Jisc Workshop: Getting to the Repository of the Future
  • Agenda 14:00 – 14:10 Context, background and aims of the day (CA) 14:10 – 14:20 Current Picture - A brief overview (BN) 14:20 – 14:30 Future Watch (CA) 14:30 – 14:35 Breakout Groups – assigning membership of each group 14:35 – 15:50 Breakout Groups Discussion 15:50 – 16:20 Feedback from groups 16:20 – 16:50 Open Discussion (CA) 16:50 – 17:00 Next steps Repository Fringe Jisc Workshop: Getting to the Repository of the Future
  • The Current Picture & Pioneering Examples Overview Repository Fringe Jisc Workshop: Getting to the Repository of the Future
  • Jisc Repository Programmes Since 2002. Now 200 repositories (approx) •Exploratory •Building Capacity •Enhancements •Rapid Innovation •Deposit •Take-Up and Embedding •Repository Shared Services Infrastructure •Repository now plays central role in management of a university’s digital assets, (including research papers, data and learning materials) Repository Fringe Jisc Workshop: Getting to the Repository of the Future
  • OR13 Jisc Workshop: Where next for Institutional Repositories?
  • Repository Pioneering Examples University of Hull Repository (Hydra) –Wanted adaptability in user interfaces and workflows to handle specific content –Worked US Fedora users, Stanford University and Virginia Tech to create the Hydra framework – to enable multiple points of access to a single body of content in a repository –Now have a flexible repository infrastructure - can handle emerging research data –Ahead in preparing the ground for data with a single repository solution. Repository Fringe Jisc Workshop: Getting to the Repository of the Future
  • University for the Creative Arts –Developed solutions for creative arts repositories (ePrints) • Kulture – ePrints plugin for arts based repositories • Kultivate (increase deposit and updating Kulture plugin) • eNova project - mePrints enhancements – to researcher profiles – more visual researcher profile page. –Creative arts repositories have enabled not only contextual researchers, but importantly practitioner based researchers, to develop and make public portfolios of their work –Supported REF submission processes. Pioneering Examples Repository Fringe Jisc Workshop: Getting to the Repository of the Future
  • Pioneering Examples Middlesex University (MIRAGE 2011 Project) –Researcher based solution (MSc students - Biomedical Modelling and Informatics) –Repository of MRI scans –Allowed 3D visualisations of 2D scans –Tailored open source visualisation software (ParaView) over repository –Tailored query interface using open Source software to allow content based image retrieval (GIFT) –Researchers able to query and retrieve data faster, increased understanding and productivity Repository Fringe Jisc Workshop: Getting to the Repository of the Future
  • MIRAGE 2011 1. Viewing of 3D images in 2D way – brain images Computed Tomography Magnetic Resonance Positron Emission tomography (CT) (MR) (PET) Repository Fringe Jisc Workshop: Getting to the Repository of the Future
  • MIRAGE 2011 • Embedding Visualization Toolkit – An Example Repository Fringe Jisc Workshop: Getting to the Repository of the Future
  • Mirage2011 Sir Muir Gray, (Chief Knowledge Officer of the NHS) the “ appl i cat i on of what we know al r eady wi l l have a gr eat er i mpact on heal t h and di sease t han any dr ug or t echnol ogy l i kel y t o be i nt r oduced i n t he next decade” . Repositories are a typical example collecting large amount of information waiting to be exploited. Repository Fringe Jisc Workshop: Getting to the Repository of the Future
  • “ the shar i ng economy is r api dl y di sr upt i ng convent i onal t r ade model s so that power i s movi ng from the cent r e t o t he edges” Rachel Botsman Speaking at the WIRED money financial event Repository Fringe Jisc Workshop: Getting to the Repository of the Future
  • Future Watch – some pointers Repository Fringe Jisc Workshop: Getting to the Repository of the Future
  • Political • Openness/transparency • Communication • Re-use • Mixed political messages and environment • Well-managed digital materials, of all sorts. What is ‘managed’?
  • Economic • Immediate, direct, revenue (through selling access & …) • Prospective, indirect, revenue (through openness) • Shared services • Service development over repositories • Repository paying its keep • Directly through exploitation • Indirectly through lowering of costs elsewhere
  • Social • Disciplinary differences • Generational differences • Current trends • Open learning • RDM • Academic shifts in need/innovation • Identifying future trends?
  • Technological • System integration • Data-centric development • Repository as infrastructure • Usability • Analytics
  • Legal • Licensing • IPR/copyright policy shifts
  • Environmental • Organisational shifts • Relationship to other systems, e.g., VLE, CRIS • Sectoral collaboration • Public engagement • Cyber security • Preservation • Parallel vs. single repository activity
  • Breakouts • Questions as prompts • Please raise your own points as well • Horizon view – 2, 5, and 10 years Repository content Repository content Repository organisation Repository organisation Repository functionality Repository functionality What do we need to do now to enable the developments we’d like to see?