The Role of the Media Industry in Advancing Digital & Media Literacy

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Hobbs explores the history of the media industry's involvement in the media literacy movement by comparing curriculum resources produced by the National Association of Broadcasters in 1962 and Google in 20111.

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The Role of the Media Industry in Advancing Digital & Media Literacy

  1. 1. The Role of the Media Industry in Advancing Digital & Media Literacy Renee Hobbs Harrington School of Communication and Media University of Rhode Island USA What Society Needs from Media in an Age of Digital Communication October 3 – 5, 2013 – Oxford UK
  2. 2. Rhetoric Print Literacy Visual Literacy Information Literacy Media Literacy Computer Literacy Critical Literacy News Literacy Digital Literacy Historical Context
  3. 3. Protection - Empowerment: A Two-Sided Coin
  4. 4. Protection
  5. 5. Empowerment
  6. 6. PASTA AD Analysis British Film Institute (1991) Learning to Critically Analyze Media Focus on Asking Questions Using a Conceptual Framework
  7. 7. Messages are Representations
  8. 8. Messages are Representations Messages Use Different Codes and Conventions
  9. 9. Messages are Representations People Interpret Messages Differently Messages Use Different Codes and Conventions
  10. 10. Messages are Representations People Interpret Messages Differently Messages Use Different Codes and Conventions Messages Have Economic & Political Power
  11. 11. Messages are Representations Messages Influence our Attitudes and Behaviors People Interpret Messages Differently Messages Use Different Codes and Conventions Messages Have Economic & Political Power
  12. 12. One Expansive Conceptualization to Unite Them All Key Concepts
  13. 13. ACCESS ANALYZEE CREATE ACT REFLECT ACCESS expanding the concept of literacy
  14. 14. Digital & Media Literacy Competencies Access, Use and Share  Keyboard and mouse skills  Be familiar with hardware, storage and file management practices  Understand hyperlinking & digital space  Gain competence with software applications  Use social media, mobile, peripheral & cloud computing tools  Identify information needs  Use effective search and find strategies  Troubleshoot and problem-solve  Learn how to learn  Listening skills  Reading comprehension
  15. 15. Digital & Media Literacy Competencies Analyze & Evaluate  Understand how symbols work: the concept of representation  Identify the author, genre, purpose and point of view of a message  Compare and contrast sources  Evaluate credibility and quality  Understand one’s own biases and world view  Recognize power relationships that shape how information and ideas circulate in culture  Understand the economic context of information and entertainment production  Examine the political and social ramifications of inequalities in information flows
  16. 16. Digital & Media Literacy Competencies Create & Collaborate  Recognize the need for communication and self-expression  Identify your own purpose, target audience, medium & genre  Brainstorm and generate ideas  Compose creatively  Play and interact  Edit and revise  Use appropriate distribution, promotion & marketing channels  Receive audience feedback  Work collaboratively  Comment, curate and remix
  17. 17. Digital & Media Literacy Competencies Reflect  Understand how differences in values and life experience shape people’s media use and message interpretation  Appreciate risks and potential harms of digital media  Apply ethical judgment and social responsibility to communication situations  Understand how concepts of ‘private’ and ‘public’ are reshaped by digital media  Appreciate and respect legal rights and responsibilities (copyright, intellectual freedom, etc)
  18. 18. Digital & Media Literacy Competencies Take Action  Acknowledge the power of communication to maintain the status quo or change the world  Participate in communities of shared interest to advance an issue  Be a change agent in the family & workplace  Participate in democratic self- governance  Speak up when you encounter injustice  Respect the law and work to change unjust laws  Use the power of communication and information to make a difference in the world
  19. 19. ACCESS ANALYZEE CREATE ACT REFLECT ACCESS expanding the concept of literacy
  20. 20. 7 Great Debates in Media Literacy 1. Should media literacy education aim to protect children and youth from negative media influences? 2. Should media production be an essential feature of media literacy education? 3. Should media literacy focus on popular culture texts? 4. Should media literacy have an explicit political & ideological agenda? 5. Should media literacy be focused on K-12 formal learning environments? 6. Should media literacy be a specialist subject or integrated across the curriclum? 7. Should media literacy be financially supported by media institutions? Hobbs, 1998
  21. 21. History of Industry Involvement in Media Literacy • Understanding New Media (NAEB, 1960) • Television Information Office (NAB, 1962) • Visual Learning (Kodak, 1969) • Creating Critical Viewers (ABC, 1991) • Know TV (Learning Channel, 1994) • Assignment: Media Literacy (Discovery Channel, 1998) • Taking Charge of Your TV (NCTA, 2001) • Messages & Meanings (NAA Foundation, 2001) • Adobe Youth Voices (Adobe, 2006) • Google Digital Literacy & Citizenship (Google, 2011)
  22. 22. Television in Today’s Society, 1962 • 13 scripts / lecture notes • Worksheets / quizzes / slides / reading list / recommendations for supplmental 16mm films • Pedagogy: Presentation by local expert; Q & A session; supplemental readings and films • Targeting young adult and adult learners as “educated and thoughtful people” • Multiple points of view from inside and outside the industry • Acknowledges the pleasure people experience with television as a leisure activity • Reflection on unintended consequences of advertising-supported economic model • Little emphasis on the impact of television on family life, social relationship or citizenship
  23. 23. Google Digital Literacy & Citizenship
  24. 24. Google Digital Literacy & Citizenship • Created in partnership with iKeepSafe • 3 videos / lesson plans • Target audience: Grades 6 – 8 (ages 11 – 13) • Pedagogy: presentation by teacher; view and discuss videos; scenario activities and games. • Goals: Increase knowledge of tools offered by Google/YouTube to detect inaccuracies and protect oneself from inappropriate content. • Provides little background information about the Internet • Tone conveys sense of urgency to follow the “do’s and don’ts” • Positions multiple points of view available online as a “problem” that needs to be solved
  25. 25. Then & Now 1962 NAB EMPOWERMENT Focus on knowledge Multiple points of view Positive tone 2011 GOOGLE PROTECTION Focus on advice Google’s point of view Tone of warning Pedagogy: lecture/activity plus discussion No focus on critical analysis | No media production
  26. 26. Stakeholders in Digital and Media Literacy BUSINESSACTIVIST GOVERNMENTLIBRARY EDUCATIONCREATIVE
  27. 27. Renee Hobbs Professor and Founding Director Harrington School of Communication and Media University of Rhode Island USA Web: www.mediaeducationlab.com Webi: www.harrington.uri.edu Email: hobbs@uri.edu Twitter: reneehobbs
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