Strategic Plan Presentation

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Strategic Plan Presentation

  1. 1. Harrington School Faculty Meeting, May 22, 2012 1
  2. 2. Harrington School Faculty Meeting, May 22, 2012Today’s Objectives Celebrate our accomplishments at the end of the academic year Review key elements of the strategic planning process Get feedback and brainstorm strategies for 2012-2013 Look forward to the future 2
  3. 3. Ranger Hall: Our New Home 3
  4. 4. Celebrate our Accomplishments in 2011-2012  Publication (books, journal articles, book chapters)  Presentation at scholarly conferences and professional events  Completed a creative work  Developed a new course  Served on a university or departmental committee  Engaged in leadership and collaboration (local, regional, national, international) 4
  5. 5. Agenda Where We Are Today Visions for the Future Achieving the Vision 5
  6. 6. Harrington School ofCommunication and Media THE PARTHENON GROUP Boston • London • Mumbai • San Francisco InterviewsStrategic Planning Process Student & Faculty Survey Alumni & Employer Survey External Benchmarking Focus Groups Financial Analysis
  7. 7. Where We Are TodayThe Harrington School enrolls students from Rhode Island, New England andNY/NJ; We attract more out-of-state students than URI’s overall population Headcount in the Harrington School by Student’s Headcount in the Harrington School by Student’s Home State, 2011-12 Home State, 2011-2012 16,017 1,276* 748 142 126 110 104 46 Total = 1,276* 100% Other 100% DC IL DC Other PA FL MD FL PA NY ME CA NY CA CA CA NY ME NY NY NY NY NY NH NJ CT NH, ME, VT NJ CT NJ NJ 80 CT 80 NJ VT ME MA NH, ME, VT NJ CT MA CT NH CT CT MA ME NH MA 60 MA 60 MA MA CT MA 40 40 RI RI RI RI RI RI RI 20 20 RI NY, NJ & Other NY, NJ & Other New England New England Rhode Island Rhode Island 0 0 Journalism Information Studies Public Relations Writing & Rhetoric University of Rhode The Harrington Communication Studies Film Island School Studies Library & Note: Excludes those students who refused to disclose their background; Headcount is the sum of full and part-time students; Source: SCM Internal Data 7
  8. 8. Where We Are TodayThe higher education market is highly fragmented and competitive with nearly70,000 students enrolled regionally; students have many choices of schools Estimated 12-Month FTE Enrollment in Bachelor’s Degree Programs by Subject In New York, New Jersey, and New England, 2009-10 0.2K 42.2K 9.2K 8.1K 5.9K 3.6K Total = 69.2K 100% Other 80 Other Other Southern Connecticut State University Other Marist College S uffolk University Other Rowan University CUNY Brooklyn College University of RhodeIsland S t. Johns University-NewY ork Ithaca College 60 University of Connecticut State University of New York at New Paltz University of Rhode Island Ithaca College Quinnipiac University St. Johns Qu n i p a Un ve ty i n i c i rsi Hofstra University University-New York CUNYBro kl yn Co l e e o l g Ithaca College Pa Un ve ty-Ne Yo ce i rsi w Ma st Co l e e ri l g rk Emerson College Hofstra University Un ve ty o Rh d Isl a d i rsi f oe n Southern Connecticut State University Emerson College Hofstra University SUNYCollege at Buffalo NortheasternUniversity Pace University-New S tate University CUNY City College York of New Y ork at 40 University of New Hampshire-Main Campus Northeastern University Ithaca College University of Rhode Island Syracuse University CUNY City College Syracuse University Marist College New P altz Northeastern University E merson College University of Massachusetts Syracuse SUNY College at Buffalo B oston College Amherst University New York University CUNYBrooklyn College Suffolk University University of Connecticut Pratt Institute-Main Syracuse University New York University CUNY Hunter College CUNY Hunter College St. Johns University-New York Quinnipiac University University of Rhode Island Ithaca College 20 FordhamUniversity William Paterson University of New Jersey Emerson College Boston University Rowan University SUNY at NY & NJ University of Massachusetts Amherst Albany University at Buffalo New England RutgersUniversity-New Brunswick New York University Rutgers University-New Brunswick Syracuse University Rhode Island Boston University 0 Information Stu dies Communication Studies Film Media Journalism Public Writing and Rhetoric Libr ary and Relations Note: Subjects are defined by applicable Classification of Instructional Programs (CIP) codes from the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES); Communication Studies includes Communication and Media Studies, Publishing, Speech Communication, and Radio, Television, and Digital Communication; Film Media includes Design and Visual communication, Film/Cinema/Video Studies, Documentary Production, Digital Arts, and Game and Interactive Media Design; Journalism includes Broadcast Journalism; Library and Information Science includes Librarianship; Public Relations includes Advertising and Applied Communication; Writing and Rhetoric includes Health and Political Communication, Rhetoric and Composition, and Technical and Business Writing Source: NCES 8
  9. 9. Where We Are TodayThe University of Rhode Island attracts students at the lower end of regionalschools offering communication and media programs SAT Scores for Incoming Students at Competing Schools In New York, New Jersey and New England, 2010 1600 1345 1310 1260 1250 1240 1220 1190 1185 1165 1165 1200 1160 1160 1155 1140 1125 1120 1095 1090 1090 1085 1075 1045 1000 992 988 940 800 400 0 UMass Amherst University University University University University Bryant University SUNY at Albany Rowan University Ithaca College Marist College Hunter College Simmons College Rhode Island University University Northeastern Syracuse Keene State Salem State William Paterson Rhode Island Emerson University of Connecticut New York St. Johns Quinnipiac University Roger Williams Fordham University at University of College Rutgers University Hofstra Boston University College University Buffalo College University CUNY In-State 2K 8K 1K 0K 3K 1K 2K 4K 8K 5K 3K 9K 6K 3K 4K 6K 2K 1K 1K 2K 1K K K K K K Tuition $7 $6 $7 $8 $7 $4 $3 $4 $4 $3 $1 $1 $3 $3 $3 $1 $2 $3 $3 $3 $3 $1 $3 $1 $1 $1 Note: Bolded schools are those considered to be “direct competitors” in terms of attracting the same set of students (based on survey analysis; each bolded school had multiple respondents indicate that they chose between URI and the bolded school) Note: *Bachelor‟s degree enrollment only; Acceptance rate, % in-state students and in-state tuition apply to fall 2011 first year students Source: NCES; College Board 9
  10. 10. Where We Are TodayOur students and our faculty are not so likely to recommend the HarringtonSchool to peers Q: How highly would you recommend the Harrington School to a friend or colleague? NPS Benchmarking: (Please rate on a scale of 0-10 where 0=Not at all likely to Net Promoter Scores measure the difference recommend and 10=Very likely to recommend) between “promoters” and “detractors” NPS: (% 9 or 10) – (% 0-6) n=89 n=42 100% 10: Would definitely 10: Would 80 recommend the definitely HarringtonSchool to recommend the a friend or colleague Harrington School 67 to a friend or 80 colleague 9 60 9 8 60 8 40 7 28 40 7 6 20 6 5 20 1 5 0 4 4 3 3 -5 2 1 2 00: Definitely would NOT recommend SCM: Current Students SCM: Faculty the Harrington School to a friend or -20 colleague SCM: Current SCM: Faculty Best-in-class Best-in-class Students for-profit media for-profit media school (campus) school (online ) Net Promoter Score 1 -5 Source: University of Rhode Island Harrington School Survey (Students: n=89; Faculty: n=42) 10
  11. 11. Agenda Where We Are Today Visions for the Future Achieving the Vision 11
  12. 12. About Our Faculty and Our Graduates As scholars, researchers, Our graduates are lifelong practitioners and creative learners who are active professionals, our faculty are participants in local and global themselves lifelong learners, communities. They embody the active and community- values of leadership, enterprise, connected, whose work is intellectual curiosity, social regionally and nationally responsibility and environmental recognized and respected. sustainability. 12
  13. 13. VisionThe Harrington School of Communication and Media is a distinctive andnationally-recognized program whose graduates are well-prepared forcitizenship, careers, and life in a rapidly changing global economy. MISSION As a learning community, we use the power of communication and digital media to make a difference. 1 2 3 Build Distinctive Increase the Make Real-World Interdisciplinary Flexibility and Learning Programs Reach of the an Integral Part of through Learning Program the School Communities 13
  14. 14. Our MissionAs a learning community, we use the power of communication and digital mediato make a difference 1 Build Distinctive Digital and Media Literacy Interdisciplinary We use the power of communication through digital media to explore new forms of expression and communication, helping people to thrive Programs as both creative producers and consumers of digital culture and initiating new through Learning approaches to using media as a tool for teaching and learning. Communities . Communication for Environmental Sustainability We use the power of communication to support the creation of environmentally sustainable communities, translating science in ways that enable public participation, collaboration and conflict resolution through environmental campaigns, social marketing, rhetoric and discourse. Engaged Communication and Action We use the power of communication as a form of civic action, working with local and global communities to address issues of equity and social justice, using leadership, creativity, collaboration and critical thinking to help improve the quality of life for people across the region and around the globe. 14
  15. 15. Our MissionAs a learning community, we use the power of communication and digital mediato make a difference 1 Build Distinctive Interdisciplinary Programs through Learning Communities Digital and Communication Engaged Media Literacy for Communication Environmental and Action Sustainability  Spaces for Research Collaboration  Expanded Scope of Faculty Expertise  Increased Investment in Graduate Education  Faculty Job Shadowing  Location-Specific Immersion Programs 15
  16. 16. VisionThe Harrington School of Communication and Media is a distinctive andnationally-recognized program whose graduates are well-prepared forcitizenship, careers, and life in a rapidly changing global economy. MISSION As a learning community, we use the power of communication and digital media to make a difference. 2 Make Real-World Learning an Integral Part of the School 16
  17. 17. Our MissionAs a learning community, we use the power of communication and digital mediato make a difference 2 Leadership in Digital Media Make Real-World Learning an Integral Part of the School  Digital Boot Camp  Youth Media Programs  Robust and Independent Student Media Network 17
  18. 18. Our MissionAs a learning community, we use the power of communication and digital mediato make a difference 2 Leadership in Internships & Career Digital Media Connections Make Real-World Learning an Integral Part of the School  Community Outreach  Digital Boot Camp  Signature Los Angeles Internship  Youth Media Programs Program  Robust and Independent  Peer Leadership: The Rangers Student Media Network  Career Network 18
  19. 19. VisionThe Harrington School of Communication and Media is a distinctive andnationally-recognized program whose graduates are well-prepared forcitizenship, careers, and life in a rapidly changing global economy. MISSION As a learning community, we use the power of communication and digital media to make a difference. 3 Increase the Flexibility and Reach of the Program 19
  20. 20. Our MissionAs a learning community, we use the power of communication and digital mediato make a difference 3 Increase the Flexibility and Reach of the Program  Accelerated Degree Programs (3-year, 2+2 and 4+1)  High School Pathway Program  Blended, Low Residency and Online Degree Programs 20
  21. 21. VisionThe Harrington School of Communication and Media is a distinctive andnationally-recognized program whose graduates are well-prepared forcitizenship, careers, and life in a rapidly changing global economy. MISSION As a learning community, we use the power of communication and digital media to make a difference. 1 2 3 Build Distinctive Increase the Make Real-World Interdisciplinary Flexibility and Learning Programs Reach of the an Integral Part of through Learning Program the School Communities 21
  22. 22. Visions for the FutureThe Harrington School’s goals are aligned with the URI strategic plan Build Make Real-World Increase URI Strategic Goals Interdisciplinary Learning an Integral Flexibility and (Select Detail) Programs Part of the School Reach Enhance Academic Quality and Value • Disciplinary & interdisciplinary research and teaching programs   • Improve faculty development and support in online learning technologies • Augment advising and mentoring as a learning vehicle Prepare Students for a Changing World • Enhance and increase interdisciplinary courses and programs at the   graduate and undergraduate levels • Boost experiential learning for undergraduate and graduate students Research and Innovation • Develop infrastructure and coordination of resources in support of   research • Develop programs that advance innovation and scholarship • Form widespread collaboration with key research faculty and potential business, nonprofit , and agency partners Global Citizenry • Develop a model that expands international / global programs and   opportunities at the University Ensure an Equitable and Inclusive Campus Community • Recruit and retain diverse faculty and staff   • Recruit and retain a diverse student community Institutional Effectiveness • Promote professional development and synergy among faculty    • Expand course timeframes to improve retention, graduation rates, and efficiency, with respect to sound academic standards and breadth or depth of student experience 22
  23. 23. Visions for the FutureTop-tier programs are innovative and interdisciplinary Top Tier School Program Offering University of Digital Media Design: Pennsylvania Interdisciplinary major combining coursework in computer graphics within the Computer & Information Science Department, communication theory courses from the Annenberg School, and Fine Arts courses from Penn‟s School of Design Syracuse University Center for Digital Literacy: Collaborative research center spanning the schools of Information Studies, Education, and Public Communication studying the impact of information, technology, and media literacy on children and adults for internal and external initiatives (e.g., foundations, government entities, etc.) University of Utah Entertainment Arts & Engineering: Interdisciplinary program between the School of Computing and the College of Fine Arts culminating in a year-long senior project where students build a video game or animation from scratch and pitch it to companies MIT Comparative Media Studies: Interdisciplinary major that explores various forms of media such as film, game design, digital artwork, and interactive media with faculty from 10 departments including art, architecture, and anthropology Northwestern Residency Program: University Journalism majors spend one quarter working fulltime for, with, and alongside veteran journalists at 150 media partners throughout the country and Latin America, Qatar, and South Africa, thereby gaining experience in all aspects of media management University of Kansas Interdisciplinary Leadership Studies: Interdisciplinary minor for communication students, integrating classes in communication with ethics, community development, and leadership, diversity, and culture courses with community service and student organizations University of North New Media Track: Carolina Interdisciplinary track designed for students interested in the computer as a humanistic or artistic medium where students choose from designated classes in Communication Studies, Computer Science, and the School of Information and Library Science Columbia University Dual Degree Programs: The Graduate School of Journalism offers several dual degree programs in cooperation with other schools and programs at Columbia University and abroad, including dual degrees in journalism and business, computer science, law, religion or international & public affairs 23
  24. 24. Agenda Where We Are Today Visions for the Future Achieving the Vision 24
  25. 25. More Issues to Consider 1 2 3 Build Distinctive Increase the Make Real-World Interdisciplinary Flexibility and Learning Programs Reach of the an Integral Part of through Learning Program the School Communities How will we support How will experiential How will we get the process of learning be integrated support for the new faculty into existing courses? technology skills we collaboration? need to make best use of online and blended How will we identify learning? How will new and structure academic programs opportunities for relate to existing students to connect Can we create programs? with alums? meaningful degree programs using 2+2 or 4+1 models? 25
  26. 26. Issues to Consider All these initiatives will cost money. Where is it going to come from? 26
  27. 27. Achieving the VisionThe Harrington School brings in nearly $13 million to the University budgetannually Budget Line Item Revenue and Cost AssumptionsPro forma Revenue: Harrington School FTE Enrollment 1486 • Based on 2010 IPEDS data • Weighted average tuition of in-state, regional and out-of- Average Tuition and Fees per student $18.8K state students Average State Appropriation per in-state student $8.3K • Based on URI budget Unrestricted Harrington School Revenue $34.4M Adjustment for SCM students taking non-SCM courses -$12.7M • Assumes SCM students take ~40% of courses outside SCM • Assumes non-SCM students take 1 Comm. and 1 Writing Adjustment for URI students taking Gen Ed SCM courses +$13.9M courseAdjusted Pro forma Harrington School Revenue $35.5MEstimated Costs: Harrington School Faculty $3.9M • FY2012 Harrington department expense budgets Summer, Per Course & Other Instructors $0.5M • FY2012 Harrington department expense budgets Fringe & Benefits $1.0M • FY2012 Harrington department expense budgets Office & Miscellaneous Expense $0.1M • FY2012 Harrington department expense budgets Department Overhead $1.4M • Allocated based on URI per student basis to SCM students Student Aid Expense $8.1M • Allocated based on URI per student basis to SCM students SCM Operating Expenditures $4.3M • Allocated based on URI per student basis to SCM students SCM share of URI debt service $1.8M • Allocated based on URI per student basis to SCM students Net Health Service Cost • Revenue and expenses allocated based on URI per student $0.1M basis to SCM students, plus 10% margin on expenses Net Housing Cost • Revenue and expenses allocated based on URI per student $0.6M basis to SCM students, plus 10% margin on expenses Net Dining Services Cost • Revenue and expenses allocated based on URI per student $0.2M basis to SCM students, plus 10% margin on expenses Facility Cost • Assumes SCM would „rent‟ a teaching facility if it were a $0.5M stand-alone unitEstimated pro forma Harrington School costs $22.6MPro forma Harrington School Contribution $12.9M 27
  28. 28. Achieving the VisionStrategic university re-investment in the Harrington School will improve thequality of the program and help us grow Revenue Type 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 Rationale Enrollment 1486 1486 1523 1561 1600 1640 • Assumes marketing efforts around theFull-time on campus strategic plan can drive enrollment growth ofSCM program Revenue $35.5M $35.5M $36.0M $36.4M $36.9M $37.4M 2.5%High School Pathway Enrollment 0 50 75 100 125 150 • Assumes incremental enrollmentProgram • Costs included in „program flexibility‟ initiative Revenue $0 $0.02M $0.02M $0.03M $0.04M $0.05M Enrollment 0 215 430 645 860 1075 • Addition of 200 undergrad and 15 gradOnline Program/Degree students a year; 40% grad rate within 4 yrs. Revenue $0 $1.7M $3.3M $5.3M $7.0M $8.7M • Tuition in line with on campus programsTOTAL REVENUE $35.5M $37.3M $39.3M $41.8M $43.9M $46.1M Costs Type 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 RationalePro forma SCM Costs $22.6M $22.6M $22.7M $22.8M $22.8M $22.9M • Increase with on-campus enrollmentOnline Development $0 $1.2M $2.3M $3.7M $4.9M $6.1M • Revenue sharing with an online enabler One-Time $0.1M* $2.4M - - - • Hire top research faculty in SCM fields • Bring in lecturers from top tier programsCurricular Reform & Recurring $2.5M $2.9M $3.1M $3.1M $3.1M • Purchase school bus to transport studentsQuality Education between campuses Total $2.6M $5.3M $3.1M $3.1M $3.1M • Build/refurbish studio & labs dedicated to SCM One-Time - - - - - • Begin digital boot camp for students and facultyReal World Learning Recurring $0.2M $0.6M $0.8M $0.8M $0.8M • Start LA program in 2015 including subsidized travel Total $0.2M $0.6M $0.8M $0.8M $0.8M • Hire professionals for experiential networking One-Time - - - - - • Begin doctoral program to attract research fellows who will teach coursesProgram Flexibility Recurring $0.2M $1.2M $1.2M $1.2M $1.2M • Institute online course in 2013 with costs to be Total $0.2M $1.2M $1.2M $1.2M $1.2M assumed starting in 2014TOTAL SCM COSTS $22.6M $26.8M $32.1M $31.6M $32.8M $34.1MCONTRIBUTION $12.9M $10.4M $7.2M $10.2M $11.1M $12.0M Note: *Excludes endowments for researchers (~$1M per person) Source: URI Internal Data; The Chronicle of Higher Education; BLS; Parthenon Analysis 28
  29. 29. Achieving the VisionA 5-year plan Program/Initiative 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 Distinctive interdisciplinary programs Curricular Reform & Quality Education Location specific immersion programs Expanded faculty hiring and graduate investment Faculty job shadowing Spaces for research collaboration Digital „boot camp‟ Real World Learning Experiential learning programs for faculty & students (incl. community outreach, peer leadership, independent student media network and youth media programs) Los Angeles internship program Advising and career network (incl. dedicated career services and internship program support) Accelerated degree program: 3 year bachelor degree Flexibility Program High School Pathway and summer programs Online and blended programs, incl. 2+2 and 4+1 programs Implementation & Planning Development 29
  30. 30. Achieving the Visionimplementing our strategic plan helps us create a distinctive Harrington Schoolprogram that effectively prepares students for a changing world 1 2 3 Build Distinctive Increase the Make Real-World Interdisciplinary Flexibility and Learning Programs Reach of the an Integral Part of through Learning Program the School Communities Strategic Goals: Innovative, nimble and Digital media and Flexible degree and frequently updated technology is used course options attract curriculum well by students and new students and meet faculty changing needs Distinctiveness is increased by three Internships and vibrant and clearly- experiential learning focused research build meaningful real- learning communities world connections 30
  31. 31. Camp Harrington Through a faculty development process, we begin the planning and development of strategic change through interdisciplinary dialogue. June 5 – 6 - 7 Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday 9:30 – 3 p.m. June 18 – 19 – 20 Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday Graduate Education 9:30 – 3 p.m. Interdisciplinary Majors LOCATION: Bay Campus, GSO GSLIS & Journalism Digital Boot Camp & Media/Technology Issues Experiential Learning Back-to-School Welcome Event 31
  32. 32. Ranger Hall: Our New Home 32
  33. 33. Faculty Meeting, May 22, 2012 33
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