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Promise And Peril
 

Promise And Peril

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Renee Hobbs presented the keynote address for the Classroom Technology Celebration, New Hampshire Department of Education, Meredith, New Hampshire, May 29, 2008.

Renee Hobbs presented the keynote address for the Classroom Technology Celebration, New Hampshire Department of Education, Meredith, New Hampshire, May 29, 2008.

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Promise And Peril Promise And Peril Presentation Transcript

  • The Promise and Peril of Media and Technology for Children and Youth Renee Hobbs Temple University, Philadelphia PA Classroom Technology Celebration New Hampshire Department of Education Local Educational Support Center Network (LESCN) May 29, 2008 Meredith, NH
  • Our Love/Hate Relationship with Media & Technology Citizen Educator Parent Self
  • Instant Message, Instant Girlfriend By ROGER HOBBS For several years I had a problem unusual among Internet geeks: I had too much success with women. I used the Internet as a means of communication with women I had already met offline in order to overcome my social awkwardness and forge romantic relationships. Sounds healthy? It wasn’t. It started in my sophomore year in high school… May 25, 2008
  • I was blinded by the common belief that somehow a relationship forged on the Internet isn’t real. When I saw that fated text message — “I love you” — I realized the truth. The Internet is not a separate place a person can go to from the real world. The Internet is the real world. Only faster. Instant Message, Instant Girlfriend May 25, 2008
  •   TECHNOLOGY
  •   TOOL: A resource that helps you do or make things TECHNOLOGY
  •   TOOL: A resource that helps you do or make things TECHNOLOGY
  •   TOOL: A resource that helps you do or make things TECHNOLOGY CONTENT: The messages that matter
  •   Current Events Entertainment Science Work Fashion Politics Math History Nature Money Love/Romance Health Stories about life TOOL: A resource that helps you do or make things TECHNOLOGY CONTENT: The messages that matter
  • MEDIA: Forms of expression and communication TOOL: A resource that helps you do or make things TECHNOLOGY CONTENT: The messages that matter
  • TOOL: A resource that helps you do or make things TECHNOLOGY CONTENT: The messages that matter MEDIA: Forms of expression and communication
  • DISTRIBUTION & PARTICIPATION: A means of sharing TOOL: A resource that helps you do or make things TECHNOLOGY CONTENT: The messages that matter MEDIA: Forms of expression and communication
  • DISTRIBUTION & PARTICIPATION: A means of sharing TOOL: A resource that helps you do or make things TECHNOLOGY CONTENT: The messages that matter MEDIA: Forms of expression and communication
  •   PEDAGOGY: A way of learning and teaching ACCESS ANALYZE/ EVALUATE COMMUNICATE ACT TOOL: A resource that helps you do or make things TECHNOLOGY CONTENT: The messages that matter DISTRIBUTION & PARTICIPATION: A means of sharing MEDIA: Forms of expression and communication
  • Media Literacy is an Expanded Conceptualization of Literacy
    • … the ability to access, analyze,
    • evaluate and communicate messages
    • in a wide variety of forms.
    • --Aspen Institute Leadership Forum on
    • Media Literacy, Washington DC (1993)
    • The purpose of
    • media literacy education is to
    • help individuals of all ages
    • develop the habits of inquiry and
    • skills of expression that they need to be critical thinkers,
    • effective communicators and
    • active citizens in today’s world.
    • --Core Principles of Media Literacy Education, AMLA, St. Louis (2007)
  • The Spiral Curriculum ACCESS ANALYZE/ EVALUATE COMMUNICATE ACT
  • Promoting Habits of Inquiry Authors & Audiences Authorship : Who made this? Purpose: Why was it made? Who is the target audience? Economics: Who paid for it? Impact: Who benefits from this? Why does this matter to me? Response: What kinds of actions might I take?
  • Promoting Habits of Inquiry Messages & Meanings Content: What is this about? What values and points of view are expressed? What is omitted? Techniques: How was this constructed? What tools and techniques were used? Interpretations: How might different people understand this message? What is my interpretation and what do I learn about myself from my reaction?
  • Promoting Habits of Inquiry Representations & Realities Representation : How does this message represent its subject? Context : When was this made? Where or how was it shared? Credibility : What are the sources of information, ideas or assertions? What criteria do I use to evaluate it?
  •  
  • Media/Communications meets Literature/Language Arts @ Concord High School
    • Year-long course, “English 11” devoted to Media/Communications
    • Instructional framework based on the habits of critical inquiry
    • Emphasis on analysis of media ‘texts’ including documentary, advertising, news, fiction
    • Seven instructors with different syllabi but sharing some common texts and activities
    • Students made significant gains in analysis skills as compared with the control group
    • Reading comprehension and writing skills improved more than control group
    • Performance on analysis of written news article and video news segment showed the most pronounced differences
  • Media/Communications meets Literature/Language Arts @ Concord High School VIDEO
  • Alignment Matters Teacher Motivations Approaches to Teacher Education Instructional Methods Media Texts, Tools & Technologies
  • Teacher Education and Media/Technology Integration  
    • Independently initiated by teacher enthusiast who is:
    • comfortable with technology & risk-taking
    • motivated by a passionate interest
    • responsive and respectful of students
    • confident in the recursive process of curriculum development
  • Teacher Education and Media/Technology Integration  
    • Independently initiated by teacher enthusiast who is:
    • comfortable with technology & risk-taking
    • motivated by a passionate interest
    • responsive and respectful of students
    • confident in the recursive process of curriculum development
    • Introduced through staff development with teachers who may be:
    • unclear about the purposes and goals of integrating media/technology
    • uncomfortable when feeling loss of expertise or loss of control
    • unfamiliar with or uninterested in technology
    • confused about what can/should be done
    • Technologies make it easy to:
    • Share
    • Use
    • Copy
    • Excerpt/Quote from
    • Modify
    • Repurpose
    • Distribute
    • Technologies make it easy to:
    • Share
    • Use
    • Copy
    • Excerpt/Quote from
    • Modify
    • Repurpose
    • Distribute
    • Owners forcefully assert their rights to:
    • Restrict
    • Limit
    • Charge high fees
    • Discourage use
    • Use scare tactics
  • The Result: Copyright Confusion
  • The Result: Copyright Confusion
  • Quiz Question: What is the purpose of copyright?
  • Quiz Question: What is the purpose of copyright?
    • To promote creativity and innovation by balancing the rights of owners & users
  • Fair Use Protects Educators
    • Fair use gives users the right to use copyrighted materials freely without payment or permission for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research.
  • The Result: Copyright Confusion VIDEO: The Cost Of Copyright Confusion
  • Tranformative Use is Fair Use
    • When a user of copyrighted materials adds value to, or repurposes materials for a use different from that for which it was originally intended, it will likely be considered transformative use; it will also likely be considered fair use. Fair use embraces the modifying of existing media content, placing it in new context. 
    • --Joyce Valenza, School Library Journal
  • Transformative Use is Fair Use
    • 1. Okay to make copies of newspaper articles, TV shows, and other copyrighted rights and use them and keep them for educational use.
    • For example, teachers can make a copy of a TV news program or use a full-page ad from a magazine and use it as a tool for learning.
    • 2. Okay to create curriculum materials and scholarship with copyrighted materials embedded.
    • For example, teachers can create a series of Powerpoint slides that show how to analyze a scene from a film using embedded clips from the film. A media scholar can use a screen shot of a website in her scholarly article to illustrate the process of identifying authorship of websites.
  • Transformative Use is Fair Use
    • 3. Okay for learners to use copyrighted works in creating new material. For example, students can use a copyrighted image of a popular icon embedded in their own writing about media and popular culture. They can use copyrighted video materials in the context of learning editing skills, or in the creation of assignments, work products or other materials.
    • 4. Okay to distribute new works digitally if they meet the transformativeness standard.
    • For example, students who make a video that critically analyzes food marketing to children and uses clips from junk-food ads can share this work on public access TV, on the school’s website, or on a public site like You Tube.
  • Renee Hobbs Founder, Media Education Lab Professor, Department of Broadcasting, Telecommunications and Mass Media School of Communications & Theater | College of Education Temple University Philadelphia PA 19122 Email: [email_address] http://mediaeducationab.com