Participation and Media

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Renee Hobbs gives a talk at Ruhr University on September 17, 2013.

Renee Hobbs gives a talk at Ruhr University on September 17, 2013.

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  • Institute for Policy Innovation global music piracy causes $12.5 billion of economic losses every year, 71,060 U.S. jobs lost, a loss of $2.7 billion in workers' earnings, and a loss of$422 million in tax revenues, $291 million in personal income tax and $131 million in lost corporate income and production taxes. FORTUNATELY: ten million licensed tracks available on more than 400 different services worldwide.  That’s great news for music fans and the industry alike.
  •  People of all ages will internalize the practice of asking critical questions about the author, purpose and point of view of every sort of message--- from political campaigns, pharmaceutical advertising, reports and surveys issued by think-tanks, websites, breaking news, email, blogs, and the opinions of politicians, pundits and celebrities.  Teachers will use engaging instructional methods to explore the complex role of news and current events in society, making connections to literature, science, health and history, building bridges between the classroom and the living room that support a lifetime of learning.  People of all ages will be responsible and civil in their communication behaviors, treating others with respect and appreciating the need for social norms of behavior that create a sense of personal accountability for one’s online and offline actions.  As a fundamental part of instruction, students will compose and create authentic messages for real audiences, using digital tools, images, language, sound and interactivity to develop knowledge and skills and discover the power of being an effective communicator.  People from all walks of life will be able to achieve their goals in finding, sharing and using information solve problems, developing the ability to access, analyze, evaluate, communicate and share ideas and information, participating in meaningful social action in their neighborhoods, communities, nation and the world.  In the process, teamwork, collaboration, reflection, ethics and social responsibility will flourish. Teachers won’t have to complain about a generation of young people who lack the ability to identify appropriate keywords for an online search activity, those who aren’t aware of which American city was devastated by Hurricane Katrina, and those who cannot identify the author of a web page.
  •  People of all ages will internalize the practice of asking critical questions about the author, purpose and point of view of every sort of message--- from political campaigns, pharmaceutical advertising, reports and surveys issued by think-tanks, websites, breaking news, email, blogs, and the opinions of politicians, pundits and celebrities.  Teachers will use engaging instructional methods to explore the complex role of news and current events in society, making connections to literature, science, health and history, building bridges between the classroom and the living room that support a lifetime of learning.  People of all ages will be responsible and civil in their communication behaviors, treating others with respect and appreciating the need for social norms of behavior that create a sense of personal accountability for one’s online and offline actions.  As a fundamental part of instruction, students will compose and create authentic messages for real audiences, using digital tools, images, language, sound and interactivity to develop knowledge and skills and discover the power of being an effective communicator.  People from all walks of life will be able to achieve their goals in finding, sharing and using information solve problems, developing the ability to access, analyze, evaluate, communicate and share ideas and information, participating in meaningful social action in their neighborhoods, communities, nation and the world.  In the process, teamwork, collaboration, reflection, ethics and social responsibility will flourish. Teachers won’t have to complain about a generation of young people who lack the ability to identify appropriate keywords for an online search activity, those who aren’t aware of which American city was devastated by Hurricane Katrina, and those who cannot identify the author of a web page.
  • .
  •  People of all ages will internalize the practice of asking critical questions about the author, purpose and point of view of every sort of message--- from political campaigns, pharmaceutical advertising, reports and surveys issued by think-tanks, websites, breaking news, email, blogs, and the opinions of politicians, pundits and celebrities.  Teachers will use engaging instructional methods to explore the complex role of news and current events in society, making connections to literature, science, health and history, building bridges between the classroom and the living room that support a lifetime of learning.  People of all ages will be responsible and civil in their communication behaviors, treating others with respect and appreciating the need for social norms of behavior that create a sense of personal accountability for one’s online and offline actions.  As a fundamental part of instruction, students will compose and create authentic messages for real audiences, using digital tools, images, language, sound and interactivity to develop knowledge and skills and discover the power of being an effective communicator.  People from all walks of life will be able to achieve their goals in finding, sharing and using information solve problems, developing the ability to access, analyze, evaluate, communicate and share ideas and information, participating in meaningful social action in their neighborhoods, communities, nation and the world.  In the process, teamwork, collaboration, reflection, ethics and social responsibility will flourish. Teachers won’t have to complain about a generation of young people who lack the ability to identify appropriate keywords for an online search activity, those who aren’t aware of which American city was devastated by Hurricane Katrina, and those who cannot identify the author of a web page.

Participation and Media Participation and Media Presentation Transcript

  • Participation and Media Renee Hobbs Professor and Founding Director Harrington School of Communication and Media University of Rhode Island USA Email: hobbs@uri.edu Twitter: reneehobbs Web: http://mediaeducationlab.com
  • Harrington School of Communication and Media University of Rhode Island USA
  • www.mediaeducationlab.com
  • www. MediaEducationLab.com
  • LOVE HATE PRINT VISUAL SOUND DIGITAL What is your own love-hate relationship to media, technology and popular culture?
  • PEER-TO-PEER FILE SHARING How education responds to changes in society and technology How technologies reshape the nature of knowledge Why a shift from passive viewing to active analysis and creative authorship of media texts supports education and literacy development How engagement with digital media and popular culture can stimulate intellectual curiosity Goals for Today’s Session
  • Expanding the Concept of Text
  • A university-school partnership program designed to strengthen children’s ability to think for themselves, communicate effectively, and use their powerful voices to contribute to the quality of life in their families, their schools, their communities, and the world. Increase school relevance by connecting classroom to contemporary culture
  • How do learners develop digital media competencies? What knowledge and competencies do they need? No Such Thing as “Digital Natives”
  • 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 Downloaded music from the Internet Created a personal webpage Gotten information from the Internet Visited Facebook Used a digital camera to take a photo Uploaded a photo Used a computer program to create or design pictures Made an avatar of myself Create a profile for myself on Facebook Created a blog Used instant messaging or chat None of these RBCS WES Children ages 9 - 11 engage in a wide variety of online activities
  • Key Concepts of Media Literacy
  • Messages are Representations
  • Messages are Representations Messages Use Different Codes and Conventions
  • Messages are Representations People Interpret Messages Differently Messages Use Different Codes and Conventions
  • Messages are Representations People Interpret Messages Differently Messages Use Different Codes and Conventions Messages Have Economic & Political Power
  • Messages are Representations Messages Influence our Attitudes and Behaviors People Interpret Messages Differently Messages Use Different Codes and Conventions Messages Have Economic & Political Power
  • NEW RELATIONSHIPS NEW TEXTS NEW TOOLS
  • Understanding & Using Social Power Fitting In Standing Out
  • Talking to Anyone about Anything LINK ... and keeping secrets from parents and adults
  • Transgressing Social Norms
  • Empowerment and protection are two sides of the same coin
  • what is the Internet for?
  • Dance Like Lady Gaga Do Research at the Virtual School Library
  • LINK
  • LINK
  • www.storify.com
  • digital & media literacy helps build bridges between classroom and culture
  • Freedom of Choice Self-Directed Participation Questioning Interpretation – Meaning Making Analysis - Synthesis Creative Composition Collaboration Sharing - Dissemination
  • closing the gap between classroom & culture creates relevance
  • relevance ignites intellectual curiosity
  • intellectual curiosity fuels lifelong learning
  • Hobbs, R. & Moore, D. (2013). Discovering media literacy: Teaching digital media and popular culture in elementary school. Thousand Oaks: Corwin/Sage. Hobbs, R. (2013). Improvization and strategic risk taking in informal learning with digital media literacy. Learning, Media and Technology, 38(2), 1 – 28. Hobbs, R. & RobbGrieco, M. (2012). African-American children’s active reasoning about media texts as a precursor to media literacy. Journal of Children and Media 6(4), 502 - 519. Grafe, S., Hobbs, R., Boos, M., Bergey, B. (2012). Teachers´ motivations for media education in Germany and in the United States. Paper presentation at Digital Media and Learning(DML) Conference, Los Angeles. Hobbs, R., Ebrahimi, A., Cabral, N., Yoon, J., & Al-Humaidan, R. (2011). Field-based teacher education in elementary media literacy as a means to promote global understanding. Action for Teacher Education 33, 144 – 156. Hobbs, R., Yoon, J., Al-Humaidan, R., Ebrahimi, A. & Cabral, N. (2011). Online digital media in elementary school. Journal of Middle East Media 7(1), 1 – 23. “Messy Engagement and Strategic Risk Taking as an Instructional Strategy in Informal Learning,” Paper presentation, International Communication Association (ICA), Phoenix, AZ. May 28, 2012. Hobbs, R. , Cohn-Geltner, H. & Landis, J. (2011). Views on the news: Media literacy empowerment competencies in the elementary grades. In C. Von Feilitzen, U. Carlsson & C. Bucht (Eds.). New questions, new insights, new approaches. The International Clearinghouse on Children, Youth and Media. NORDICOM. University of Gothenburg, Sweden (pp. 43 – 56).
  • Renee Hobbs Professor and Founding Director Harrington School of Communication and Media University of Rhode Island USA Email: hobbs@uri.edu Twitter: reneehobbs Web: http://mediaeducationlab.com