Media Literacy for Life Skills
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Media Literacy for Life Skills

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Renee Hobbs shows how media literacy support life skills education for SAP educators in Lancaster, Pennsylvania on December 4, 2009.

Renee Hobbs shows how media literacy support life skills education for SAP educators in Lancaster, Pennsylvania on December 4, 2009.

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  • Where and how they use media has changed too: Media today is mobile, giving kids 24/7 access to their favorite TV shows, music, movies and games, wherever they are. Increase of media in children’s bedrooms: making media consumption a private and individual experience Media is also user generated. Kids are no longer just passive observers -- they are active participants in creating media. Whether it’s voting for their favorite Idol, creating a video to post on YouTube, or developing an online identity. Did you know that more than 65,000 videos are uploaded on YouTube daily? And that more than 10 million videos are downloaded each day?
  • I was at the bottom of the barrel: a plump, silent, painfully awkward dweeb who clung to his Latin textbook as if it held the secrets to existence. The only good thing that happened to me that year was meeting Chelsea. We talked for maybe 5 minutes about video games between classes, and of that time I spent 4 minutes and 59 seconds dripping in nervous sweat and trying to swallow my stutter. Whenever I tried to say something charming, my sentence drooped off with an invisible ellipsis. My words of wit fell flat, and my skillful cultural allusions deteriorated into a stream of loosely associated quotations from “Star Trek.” I don’t know what it was exactly. Somewhere in the dark reaches of the Internet I went through a transformation sequence worthy of a Japanese children’s cartoon. I suddenly shifted from an overweight, overdressed frog to a charming, handsome, technology-savvy prince. I was hooked. It was as if the Internet had allowed me to turn flirtation and seduction into a video game. But I didn’t know if my Internet charms were just a fluke or if they were real. I wanted, no, needed to know that the cool person I became when my fingers caressed the keys was actually me. Therefore, with a scientific resolve possessed only by physicists and 80th-level paladins, I set out to repeat my success. I didn’t want another girlfriend per se, but rather I wanted the affirmation that would come with being able to get another girlfriend. I did it again and again. In five minutes I could persuade a girl to give me her screen name and a week after that I could persuade her to go out with me. By the end of the year, I had six girlfriends simultaneously, all maintained through a complicated system of instant messenger, e-mail messages and heavily orchestrated dates.
  • When two nerds break up in person, the threat of eye contact typically ends the conversation in minutes. It’s painful, but at least it’s quick. When two nerds break up over the phone, it can take about an hour. With e-mail or instant messages, the fight can last longer than a special edition “Lord of the Rings” movie. Don’t mistake my story for a technophobe’s cautionary tale, however.
  • Where and how they use media has changed too: Media today is mobile, giving kids 24/7 access to their favorite TV shows, music, movies and games, wherever they are. Increase of media in children’s bedrooms: making media consumption a private and individual experience Media is also user generated. Kids are no longer just passive observers -- they are active participants in creating media. Whether it’s voting for their favorite Idol, creating a video to post on YouTube, or developing an online identity. Did you know that more than 65,000 videos are uploaded on YouTube daily? And that more than 10 million videos are downloaded each day?

Media Literacy for Life Skills Media Literacy for Life Skills Presentation Transcript

  • Media Literacy as a Life Skill for Pennsylvania Children and Youth Renee Hobbs Temple University Philadelphia PA
  •  
  •   Developing Life Skills for Healthy Decision-making
    • Media literacy is useful for exploring many aspects of contemporary life, including:
    • Substance abuse
    • Aggression and bullying
    • Gender and racial representations
    • Relationships and sexuality
    • Nutrition, fitness, body image and weight management
    • Media addictions and media in family life
    • Ethics of online communication
  • Types of Media books newspapers magazines movies television shows radio & music videogames Internet email cell phones
  • Middle School Students Spend 8 hrs/day in Screen Activity
  • Middle School Students Spend 8 hrs/day in Screen Activity
    • Most have a TV in their bedroom
    • Watch 6 – 12 movies per week
    • Listen to 15 hours of music weekly
    • List three or more favorite celebrities, athletes or musicians
    • Use social media websites for 40 minutes per day
    • Some create original content while online
  • Middle School Students Spend 8 hrs/day in Screen Activity
    • Most have a TV in their bedroom
    • Watch 6 – 12 movies per week
    • Listen to 15 hours of music weekly
    • List three or more favorite celebrities, athletes or musicians
    • Use social media websites for 40 minutes per day
    • Some create original content while online
    • 4 of 5 teens say they rarely discuss media & technology issues with parents or other adults
  •  
  • Media today is mobile and user generated Media Today is Mobile and User-Generated
  • Our Love/Hate Relationship with Media & Technology Citizen Educator Parent Self
  • Instant Message, Instant Girlfriend By ROGER HOBBS For several years I had a problem unusual among Internet geeks: I had too much success with women. I used the Internet as a means of communication with women I had already met offline in order to overcome my social awkwardness and forge romantic relationships. Sounds healthy? It wasn’t. It started in my sophomore year in high school… May 25, 2008
  • I was blinded by the common belief that somehow a relationship forged on the Internet isn’t real. When I saw that fated text message — “I love you” — I realized the truth. The Internet is not a separate place a person can go to from the real world. The Internet is the real world. Only faster. Instant Message, Instant Girlfriend May 25, 2008
  • … .the ability to access, analyze, evaluate and communicate messages in a wide variety of forms
    • What is Media Literacy?
    Exploring mass media, popular culture and digital media
  • What Life Skills do We Need for Navigating Digital Media? Using Tools & Technology Resources Well Critical Analysis, Reflection & Ethics Teamwork & Problem- Solving Creativity & Expression
  •  
  • Building Analysis and Critical Thinking Skills with the Media Literacy Remote Control
  • Captain Morgan Rum Use the critical questions to analyze the message
    • Analyze an Alcohol Ad
    • Who is the author and what is the purpose?
  • Analyze an Alcohol Ad 2.What techniques are used to attract and hold attention?
  • 3. What lifestyles, values and points of view are represented? The ad suggests a meaning. It doesn’t state the meaning directly. What are some possible messages that the advertiser wants you to think or feel after viewing this ad?
  • 4.How might different people interpret this message?
  • 5.What is omitted? What is the difference between representation and reality?
  • Captain Morgan Deconstructed
    • Purpose
    • This is a print ad designed to make young women want to drink Captain Morgan Rum. They spent $14 million in 2006 on advertising.
    The drawn cartoon character and cartoon-like boots contrast with the realistic photograph. It catches your attention. 2. Techniques Red is a big contrast with the dark colors of the outdoor, nighttime setting. 4. Different Interpretations Some people will see this girl as a role model– others will not.
    • 3. Subtext
    • You’ll get attention if
    • you drink alcohol.
    • You can dress and act
    • outrageously if you drink alcohol.
    5. Representation – Reality When people drink, they can do stupid things to make themselves the center of attention – in a very negative and dangerous way.
  •  
  • Key Concepts of Media Literacy
    • All messages are constructed.
    • Each medium has different characteristics, strengths and a unique “language” of construction.
    • All messages contain embedded values and points of view.
    • People use their individual skills, beliefs, and experiences to construct their own meanings from messages.
    • Messages must be considered within a social, political and economic context.
    • Media and media messages can influence beliefs, attitudes, values, behaviors and the democratic process.
  • http://mediaeducationlab.com
  • Integrating ML Across the Curriculum 1. Teaching With Media & Technology 2. Making Connections with Out-of-School Literacies 3. Developing Information Access & Research Skills 4. Strengthening Message Analysis Skills 5. Composing Messages using Multimedia 6. Exploring Media Issues in Society 7. Sharing Ideas and Taking Action
  •   Developing Life Skills for Healthy Decision-making
    • Media literacy is useful for exploring many aspects of contemporary life, including:
    • Substance abuse
    • Aggression and bullying
    • Gender and racial representations
    • Relationships and sexuality
    • Nutrition, fitness, body image and weight management
    • Media addictions and media in family life
    • Ethics of online communication
  •  
  • Media today is mobile and user generated Media Today is Mobile and User-Generated
  •  
  • Building Analysis and Critical Thinking Skills with the Media Literacy Remote Control
  • The Big Picture for Life in a Digital Nation Media Literacy at School Understanding Children’s and Teens’ Media & Technology Practices Media Literacy at Home Critical Thinking, Reflection, & Ethics Creativity & Expression Collaboration & Teamwork
  • Promoting Habits of Inquiry Critical Thinking
  •  
    • The purpose of
    • media literacy education is to
    • help individuals of all ages
    • develop the habits of inquiry and
    • skills of expression that they need to be critical thinkers,
    • effective communicators and
    • active citizens in today’s world.
    • --Core Principles of Media Literacy Education, AMLA, St. Louis (2007)
  • http://mediaeducationlab.com
  • CONTACT: Renee Hobbs Temple University School of Communications and Theater Media Education Lab Philadelphia PA 19122 Email: [email_address] Phone: (215) 204-4291 Web: http://mediaeducationlab.com