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Media Literacy
Media Literacy
Media Literacy
Media Literacy
Media Literacy
Media Literacy
Media Literacy
Media Literacy
Media Literacy
Media Literacy
Media Literacy
Media Literacy
Media Literacy
Media Literacy
Media Literacy
Media Literacy
Media Literacy
Media Literacy
Media Literacy
Media Literacy
Media Literacy
Media Literacy
Media Literacy
Media Literacy
Media Literacy
Media Literacy
Media Literacy
Media Literacy
Media Literacy
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Media Literacy

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Renee Hobbs gave a keynote address entitled, “Media Literacy: Activism, Consumption and Production,” Boston Public Schools, Arts Media and Communication Conference, Northeastern University, Boston. …

Renee Hobbs gave a keynote address entitled, “Media Literacy: Activism, Consumption and Production,” Boston Public Schools, Arts Media and Communication Conference, Northeastern University, Boston. February 2, 2008.

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  • 1. Media Literacy: Consumption, Production & Activism in 21 st Century Education
    • By Renee Hobbs
    • Temple University, Philadelphia PA
    • Boston Public Schools Office of High School Renewal
    • Career & Technical Education
    • Arts Media & Communications Industry Cluster Conference
    • Northeastern University, Boston
    • February 2, 2008
  • 2. Our Love/Hate Relationship with Media and Technology
    • Print media -- books, newspapers & magazines
    • Visual media -- television & movies
    • Sound media -- radio, tapes, CDs, music
    • Digital media -- internet, videogames, email
  • 3. ML Remote Control
    • A visual metaphor for understanding elements of message analysis
  • 4. Media Literacy is a Life Skill
    • “ The students who come to us now exist in the most manipulative culture human beings have ever experienced. They are bombarded with signs, with rhetoric . . . especially with signs transmitted by audio-visual media.
    • What they need from us is how to make sense of their worlds, to determine their own interests, both individual and collective, to see through the manipulations of all sorts of texts in all sorts of media, and to express their own views in some appropriate way."
  • 5. Integrating ML into the Curriculum 1. Teaching With Media 2. Home Media Management 3. Strengthening Message Analysis Skills 4. Composing Media Messages 5. Exploring Media Issues in Society 6. Taking Action to Make a Difference
  • 6.
    • Using popular print, visual, video, web sources in the classroom to support or enhance the learning experience
    Teaching WITH Media 1
  • 7. Home Media Management
    • Reflecting on media use patterns and habits
    • Making effective choices in using media
    • Learning to become a responsible media & technology consumer
    2
  • 8. Strengthening Message Analysis Skills
    • Asking questions about media messages
    • Learning to analyze the form, content of media messages
    • Understanding political and economic contexts
    3
  • 9. Composing Media Messages
    • Creating messages using media and technology
    • Developing skills of self-expression & communication
    4
  • 10. Exploring Media & Society Issues
    • Examining the media’s functions and roles in society
    5
  • 11. -- propaganda in war coverage -- the First Amendment & social responsibility -- media violence in news & entertainment -- advertising & materialism -- media, political campaigns & elections -- online social networking -- videogames & family communication -- gender & racial stereotypes in media -- celebrity culture & social values -- media, body image & self-esteem -- advertising’s use of sexuality -- teens & online pornography Exploring Media & Society Issues 5
  • 12. Taking Action to Make a Difference
    • planning, organizing and implementing a complex project
    • collaborating with others to make a difference in the real world
    6
  • 13. Approaches to Curriculum Integration 1. Teaching With Media 2. Home Media Management 3. Strengthening Message Analysis Skills 4. Composing Media Messages 5. Exploring Media Issues in Society 6. Taking Action to Make a Difference
  • 14. How Do These Approaches Come Together? Kids Play (1995) Educational Video Center
  • 15. Which Approaches Were Used? 1. Teaching With Media 2. Home Media Management 3. Strengthening Message Analysis Skills 4. Composing Media Messages 5. Exploring Media Issues in Society 6. Taking Action to Make a Difference
  • 16.
    • Why do so few youth-produced multimedia productions address issues of media and culture?
  • 17. COPYRIGHT CONFUSION
    • Why do so few youth-produced multimedia productions address issues of media and culture?
  • 18. Media Literacy & User Rights
    • Fair use doctrine enables the use of copyrighted materials without payment or permission when the use in question is “transformative,” adding value to the original material or putting material in a new context
  • 19. But…What Works? 1. Teaching With Media 2. Home Media Management 3. Strengthening Message Analysis Skills 4. Composing Media Messages 5. Exploring Media Issues in Society 6. Taking Action to Make a Difference
  • 20.
    • Media literacy education has varied characteristics based on program design, learning outcomes, setting, teacher qualifications, and the perceptions of the value of the program by participating teachers and students.
    What Works Kist, New Literacies in Action , 2005
  • 21.
    • Use of contemporary media and popular culture in the classroom makes a difference.
    • Motivation and engagement are increased when students get opportunities to analyze and manipulate familiar texts.
    Michie, Holler if You Hear Me , 1999 What Works
  • 22.
    • Media production is a form of composition with many similarities to the writing process.
    • Students can learn to use & apply many rhetorical concepts in the multimedia production process.
    Bruce, “Multimedia production as composition,” Research on Teaching Literacy Through the Visual and Communicative Arts , (2008). What Works
  • 23.
    • When integrated into English language arts, MLE strengthens adolescent literacy learning, including reading comprehension, analysis, and writing skills.
    Hobbs, Reading the Media: Media Literacy in High School English (2007) What Works
  • 24.
    • When MLE involves collaborative work, students’ social relationship skills in interacting with peers and adults are strengthened, leading to improvements in self-esteem and emotional development.
    Goodman, Teaching Youth Media , 2003 What Works
  • 25.
    • Media literacy improves children’s ability to make distinctions between real life experiences and media representations.
    • MLE alters expectations concerning alcohol and tobacco use among school-age youth.
    Austin, Pinkleton, Hust & Cohen, Health Communication , 2004 What Works
  • 26.
    • Media literacy programs can cause lowered internalization of the beauty standard. It can lower the perceived realism of media images for adolescent females.
    Irving, DuPen & Berel, 1998; Neumark-Sztainer et al, 2000 What Works
  • 27. Media Literacy: Literacy for the Information Age 1. Teaching with Media 2. Home Media Management 3. Strengthening Message Analysis Skills 4. Composing Media Messages 5. Exploring Media Issues in Society 6. Taking Action to Make a Difference
  • 28. Renee Hobbs Professor of Communication Media Education Lab Temple University Philadelphia PA 19122 Phone: (215) 204-4291 Web Site: http://mediaeducationlab.com Email: [email_address]
  • 29.  

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