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Media And Democracy 21st Century Hobbs
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Media And Democracy 21st Century Hobbs

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Hobbs introduces the challenges associated with teaching about media and democracy and shows how core concepts of media literacy can promote critical thinking, creativity, collaboration and ...

Hobbs introduces the challenges associated with teaching about media and democracy and shows how core concepts of media literacy can promote critical thinking, creativity, collaboration and communication skills.

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  • I was at the bottom of the barrel: a plump, silent, painfully awkward dweeb who clung to his Latin textbook as if it held the secrets to existence. The only good thing that happened to me that year was meeting Chelsea. We talked for maybe 5 minutes about video games between classes, and of that time I spent 4 minutes and 59 seconds dripping in nervous sweat and trying to swallow my stutter. Whenever I tried to say something charming, my sentence drooped off with an invisible ellipsis. My words of wit fell flat, and my skillful cultural allusions deteriorated into a stream of loosely associated quotations from “Star Trek.” I don’t know what it was exactly. Somewhere in the dark reaches of the Internet I went through a transformation sequence worthy of a Japanese children’s cartoon. I suddenly shifted from an overweight, overdressed frog to a charming, handsome, technology-savvy prince. I was hooked. It was as if the Internet had allowed me to turn flirtation and seduction into a video game. But I didn’t know if my Internet charms were just a fluke or if they were real. I wanted, no, needed to know that the cool person I became when my fingers caressed the keys was actually me. Therefore, with a scientific resolve possessed only by physicists and 80th-level paladins, I set out to repeat my success. I didn’t want another girlfriend per se, but rather I wanted the affirmation that would come with being able to get another girlfriend. I did it again and again. In five minutes I could persuade a girl to give me her screen name and a week after that I could persuade her to go out with me. By the end of the year, I had six girlfriends simultaneously, all maintained through a complicated system of instant messenger, e-mail messages and heavily orchestrated dates.
  • When two nerds break up in person, the threat of eye contact typically ends the conversation in minutes. It’s painful, but at least it’s quick. When two nerds break up over the phone, it can take about an hour. With e-mail or instant messages, the fight can last longer than a special edition “Lord of the Rings” movie. Don’t mistake my story for a technophobe’s cautionary tale, however.

Media And Democracy 21st Century Hobbs Media And Democracy 21st Century Hobbs Presentation Transcript

  • What is Media Literacy? Renee Hobbs Temple University Philadelphia PA
  • Our Love/Hate Relationship with Media & Technology Citizen Educator Parent Self
  • Instant Message, Instant Girlfriend By ROGER HOBBS For several years I had a problem unusual among Internet geeks: I had too much success with women. I used the Internet as a means of communication with women I had already met offline in order to overcome my social awkwardness and forge romantic relationships. Sounds healthy? It wasn’t. It started in my sophomore year in high school… May 25, 2008
  • I was blinded by the common belief that somehow a relationship forged on the Internet isn’t real. When I saw that fated text message — “I love you” — I realized the truth. The Internet is not a separate place a person can go to from the real world. The Internet is the real world. Only faster. Instant Message, Instant Girlfriend May 25, 2008
  • What are Media?
  •   TECHNOLOGY
  •   TOOL: A resource that helps you do or make things TECHNOLOGY
  •   TOOL: A resource that helps you do or make things TECHNOLOGY
  •   TOOL: A resource that helps you do or make things TECHNOLOGY CONTENT: The messages that matter
  •   Current Events Entertainment Science Work Fashion Politics Math History Nature Money Love/Romance Health Stories about life TOOL: A resource that helps you do or make things TECHNOLOGY CONTENT: The messages that matter
  • MEDIA: Forms of expression and communication TOOL: A resource that helps you do or make things TECHNOLOGY CONTENT: The messages that matter
  • TOOL: A resource that helps you do or make things TECHNOLOGY CONTENT: The messages that matter MEDIA: Forms of expression and communication
  • DISTRIBUTION & PARTICIPATION: A means of sharing TOOL: A resource that helps you do or make things TECHNOLOGY CONTENT: The messages that matter MEDIA: Forms of expression and communication
  • DISTRIBUTION & PARTICIPATION: A means of sharing TOOL: A resource that helps you do or make things TECHNOLOGY CONTENT: The messages that matter MEDIA: Forms of expression and communication
  • What is Media Literacy?
  • Media Literacy is an Expanded Conceptualization of Literacy
    • SPEAKING & LISTENING
    • READING & WRITING
    • CRITICAL VIEWING
    • & MEDIA COMPOSITION
    • --Aspen Institute Leadership Forum on
    • Media Literacy, Washington DC (1993)
  • Integrating ML Across the Curriculum 1. Teaching With Media & Technology 2. Making Connections with Out-of-School Literacies 3. Developing Information Access & Research Skills 4. Strengthening Message Analysis Skills 5. Composing Messages using Multimedia 6. Exploring Media Issues in Society 7. Sharing Ideas and Taking Action
  • The Literacy Spiral ACCESS ANALYZE/ EVALUATE COMMUNICATE ACT
  •   Media Literacy as Literacy for the Information Age A Process of Healthy Decision-making
    • Useful for exploring many health topics including:
    • Substance abuse
    • Aggression and bullying
    • Gender and racial representations
    • Relationships and sexuality
    • Nutrition, fitness, body image and weight management
    • Media addictions and media in family life
    ACCESS ANALYZE/ EVALUATE COMMUNICATE ACT
  • http://mediaeducationlab.com
    • The purpose of
    • media literacy education is to
    • help individuals of all ages
    • develop the habits of inquiry and
    • skills of expression that they need to be critical thinkers,
    • effective communicators and
    • active citizens in today’s world.
    • --Core Principles of Media Literacy Education, AMLA, St. Louis (2007)
  • http://mediaeducationlab.com
  • Building Analysis and Critical Thinking Skills with the Media Literacy Remote Control
  • Promoting Habits of Inquiry
  • Promoting Habits of Inquiry Authors & Audiences Authorship : Who made this? Purpose: Why was it made? Who is the target audience? Economics: Who paid for it? Impact: Who benefits from this? Why does this matter to me? Response: What kinds of actions might I take?
  • Promoting Habits of Inquiry Messages & Meanings Content: What is this about? What values and points of view are expressed? What is omitted? Techniques: How was this constructed? What tools and techniques were used? Interpretations: How might different people understand this message? What is my interpretation and what do I learn about myself from my reaction?
  • Promoting Habits of Inquiry Representations & Realities Representation : How does this message represent its subject? Context : When was this made? Where or how was it shared? Credibility : What are the sources of information, ideas or assertions? What criteria do I use to evaluate it?
  • Promoting Habits of Inquiry
  • http://mediaeducationlab.com
  • CONTACT: Professor Renee Hobbs, Ed.D. Temple University Philadelphia PA 19122 Email: [email_address] Phone: (215) 204-4291 Web: http://mediaeducationlab.com