Hobbs Keynote, Turkish Private Schools Association

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  •  People of all ages will internalize the practice of asking critical questions about the author, purpose and point of view of every sort of message--- from political campaigns, pharmaceutical advertising, reports and surveys issued by think-tanks, websites, breaking news, email, blogs, and the opinions of politicians, pundits and celebrities.  Teachers will use engaging instructional methods to explore the complex role of news and current events in society, making connections to literature, science, health and history, building bridges between the classroom and the living room that support a lifetime of learning.  People of all ages will be responsible and civil in their communication behaviors, treating others with respect and appreciating the need for social norms of behavior that create a sense of personal accountability for one’s online and offline actions.  As a fundamental part of instruction, students will compose and create authentic messages for real audiences, using digital tools, images, language, sound and interactivity to develop knowledge and skills and discover the power of being an effective communicator.  People from all walks of life will be able to achieve their goals in finding, sharing and using information solve problems, developing the ability to access, analyze, evaluate, communicate and share ideas and information, participating in meaningful social action in their neighborhoods, communities, nation and the world.  In the process, teamwork, collaboration, reflection, ethics and social responsibility will flourish. Teachers won’t have to complain about a generation of young people who lack the ability to identify appropriate keywords for an online search activity, those who aren’t aware of which American city was devastated by Hurricane Katrina, and those who cannot identify the author of a web page.
  •  People of all ages will internalize the practice of asking critical questions about the author, purpose and point of view of every sort of message--- from political campaigns, pharmaceutical advertising, reports and surveys issued by think-tanks, websites, breaking news, email, blogs, and the opinions of politicians, pundits and celebrities.  Teachers will use engaging instructional methods to explore the complex role of news and current events in society, making connections to literature, science, health and history, building bridges between the classroom and the living room that support a lifetime of learning.  People of all ages will be responsible and civil in their communication behaviors, treating others with respect and appreciating the need for social norms of behavior that create a sense of personal accountability for one’s online and offline actions.  As a fundamental part of instruction, students will compose and create authentic messages for real audiences, using digital tools, images, language, sound and interactivity to develop knowledge and skills and discover the power of being an effective communicator.  People from all walks of life will be able to achieve their goals in finding, sharing and using information solve problems, developing the ability to access, analyze, evaluate, communicate and share ideas and information, participating in meaningful social action in their neighborhoods, communities, nation and the world.  In the process, teamwork, collaboration, reflection, ethics and social responsibility will flourish. Teachers won’t have to complain about a generation of young people who lack the ability to identify appropriate keywords for an online search activity, those who aren’t aware of which American city was devastated by Hurricane Katrina, and those who cannot identify the author of a web page.
  •  People of all ages will internalize the practice of asking critical questions about the author, purpose and point of view of every sort of message--- from political campaigns, pharmaceutical advertising, reports and surveys issued by think-tanks, websites, breaking news, email, blogs, and the opinions of politicians, pundits and celebrities.  Teachers will use engaging instructional methods to explore the complex role of news and current events in society, making connections to literature, science, health and history, building bridges between the classroom and the living room that support a lifetime of learning.  People of all ages will be responsible and civil in their communication behaviors, treating others with respect and appreciating the need for social norms of behavior that create a sense of personal accountability for one’s online and offline actions.  As a fundamental part of instruction, students will compose and create authentic messages for real audiences, using digital tools, images, language, sound and interactivity to develop knowledge and skills and discover the power of being an effective communicator.  People from all walks of life will be able to achieve their goals in finding, sharing and using information solve problems, developing the ability to access, analyze, evaluate, communicate and share ideas and information, participating in meaningful social action in their neighborhoods, communities, nation and the world.  In the process, teamwork, collaboration, reflection, ethics and social responsibility will flourish. Teachers won’t have to complain about a generation of young people who lack the ability to identify appropriate keywords for an online search activity, those who aren’t aware of which American city was devastated by Hurricane Katrina, and those who cannot identify the author of a web page.
  •  People of all ages will internalize the practice of asking critical questions about the author, purpose and point of view of every sort of message--- from political campaigns, pharmaceutical advertising, reports and surveys issued by think-tanks, websites, breaking news, email, blogs, and the opinions of politicians, pundits and celebrities.  Teachers will use engaging instructional methods to explore the complex role of news and current events in society, making connections to literature, science, health and history, building bridges between the classroom and the living room that support a lifetime of learning.  People of all ages will be responsible and civil in their communication behaviors, treating others with respect and appreciating the need for social norms of behavior that create a sense of personal accountability for one’s online and offline actions.  As a fundamental part of instruction, students will compose and create authentic messages for real audiences, using digital tools, images, language, sound and interactivity to develop knowledge and skills and discover the power of being an effective communicator.  People from all walks of life will be able to achieve their goals in finding, sharing and using information solve problems, developing the ability to access, analyze, evaluate, communicate and share ideas and information, participating in meaningful social action in their neighborhoods, communities, nation and the world.  In the process, teamwork, collaboration, reflection, ethics and social responsibility will flourish. Teachers won’t have to complain about a generation of young people who lack the ability to identify appropriate keywords for an online search activity, those who aren’t aware of which American city was devastated by Hurricane Katrina, and those who cannot identify the author of a web page.
  •  People of all ages will internalize the practice of asking critical questions about the author, purpose and point of view of every sort of message--- from political campaigns, pharmaceutical advertising, reports and surveys issued by think-tanks, websites, breaking news, email, blogs, and the opinions of politicians, pundits and celebrities.  Teachers will use engaging instructional methods to explore the complex role of news and current events in society, making connections to literature, science, health and history, building bridges between the classroom and the living room that support a lifetime of learning.  People of all ages will be responsible and civil in their communication behaviors, treating others with respect and appreciating the need for social norms of behavior that create a sense of personal accountability for one’s online and offline actions.  As a fundamental part of instruction, students will compose and create authentic messages for real audiences, using digital tools, images, language, sound and interactivity to develop knowledge and skills and discover the power of being an effective communicator.  People from all walks of life will be able to achieve their goals in finding, sharing and using information solve problems, developing the ability to access, analyze, evaluate, communicate and share ideas and information, participating in meaningful social action in their neighborhoods, communities, nation and the world.  In the process, teamwork, collaboration, reflection, ethics and social responsibility will flourish. Teachers won’t have to complain about a generation of young people who lack the ability to identify appropriate keywords for an online search activity, those who aren’t aware of which American city was devastated by Hurricane Katrina, and those who cannot identify the author of a web page.
  • Please share the White Paper with colleagues and all who see that the time is now – together, we can build a community education movement for digital and media literacy.
  •  People of all ages will be responsible and civil in their communication behaviors, treating others with respect and appreciating the need for social norms of behavior that create a sense of personal accountability for one’s online and offline actions.
  •  We’ll reach underserved youth including those young people who experience the juvenile justice system, who may be among the most vulnerable to negative messages in the media because of the lack of access to supportive adults and other resiliency factors.
  •  We’ll reach underserved youth including those young people who experience the juvenile justice system, who may be among the most vulnerable to negative messages in the media because of the lack of access to supportive adults and other resiliency factors.
  • EU Survey of risks N = 25,000 kids from 13 countriesThe survey asked about a range of risks, asdetailed in what follows. Looking across allthese risks, 41% of European 9-16 year oldshave encountered one or more of theserisks. Risks increase with age: 14% of 9-10 yearolds have encountered one or more of the risksasked about, rising to 33% of 11-12 year olds,49% of 13-14 year olds and 63% of 15-16 yearolds.
  • Hobbs Keynote, Turkish Private Schools Association

    1. 1. Digital & Media Literacy: Connecting Classroom to Culture Renee Hobbs Professor and Founding Director Harrington School of Communication and Media University of Rhode Island USA The Turkish Private Schools Association February 8, 2013 ANTALYA TURKEY
    2. 2. www.mediaeducationlab.com
    3. 3. Harrington School of Communication and Media University of Rhode Island USA
    4. 4. Stakeholders in Digital Literacy EDUCATION CREATIVE GOVERNMENT LIBRARY TECH BUSINESS ACTIVIST
    5. 5. Literacy Visual Literacy Information Literacy Media Literacy Computer Literacy Critical Literacy News Literacy Digital LiteracyDigital Literacy in Historical Context
    6. 6. A Lifelong Process
    7. 7. A Lifelong Process
    8. 8. A Lifelong Process
    9. 9. Texts of Digital & Media Literacy
    10. 10. music & sound
    11. 11. entertainment
    12. 12. internet
    13. 13. videogames
    14. 14. social media
    15. 15. apps Texts of Digital & Media LiteracyWHY THE TIME IS RIGHT
    16. 16. Ignore Engage
    17. 17. LOVE IT HATE ITPRINT: Books, newspapers & magazinesVISUAL: Films, movies & TV showsSOUND: Radio & recorded musicDIGITAL: Social media, Internet & videogames
    18. 18. LOVE HATE PRINT VISUAL SOUND DIGITAL How do your attitudes about media, technology and popular culture shape your work with children and youth?
    19. 19. THE TECHIEYou’re the educator who loves tablets, apps, programs, plug-ins, widgets, websites, and other types of educationaltechnology because you have a passionate curiosity aboutnew tools. You see much potential to engage students withthe technology tools they love and use in their everyday lives.THE MOTIVATORYou are a catalyst for your students’ creative energy. In yourclass, students get energized and inspired using media andtechnology to become creative, competent and lifelonglearners.
    20. 20. THE DEMYSTIFIER As a teacher, you “pull back the curtain” to help students seehow various forms of information and knowledge areconstructed. You emphasize the practice of critical thinking,helping students ask good “how” and “why” questions.THE ACTIVISTAs an educator, you want to make society more just andequitable by promoting democratic participation. You usemedia in the classroom as a catalyst for students tounderstand how they might have a voice in improving thequality of life in their communities and in the world.
    21. 21. Teachers’ knowledge, beliefs and attitudes aboutprint, visual, sound and digital media shape theirpedagogical uses of technology in the classroom.
    22. 22. Opportunities to ACCESS, ANALYZE, COMPOSE, REFLECT and ACTusing media, technology and popular culture should be anessential component of elementary and secondary educationalprograms
    23. 23. Why Does it Matter?
    24. 24. Developmental Characteristics of Adolescence
    25. 25. Searching for the Sensational
    26. 26. Escaping to Alternative Worlds
    27. 27. Playing with Identity
    28. 28. Speaking Out as a Civic Actor
    29. 29. Developing Emotional Reasoning
    30. 30. Understanding & Using Social PowerFitting InStanding Out
    31. 31. Talking to Anyone about Anything ... and keeping secrets from parents and adultsLINK
    32. 32. Transgressing Social Norms
    33. 33. Access, Create & Analyze & Apply EthicalUse & Share Collaborate Evaluate Judgment
    34. 34. Digital & Media Literacy Instructional Practices1. Reflect on our Media Choices2. Play and Learning with Media & Technology3. Develop Information Access & Research Skills4. Strengthen Message Analysis Skills5. Compose Messages using Multimedia Tools6. Explore Media Issues in Society7. Share Ideas and Taking Action
    35. 35. How do educators create learning experiences to meet the current and future needs of children and youth?
    36. 36. Kindergarten Children Gain Media Vocabulary LINK
    37. 37. Elementary Children Develop a Public Awareness Campaign LINK
    38. 38. Middle School Students DevelopLocal News and Current Events Stories LINK
    39. 39. High School Students Compose an Educational Music Video LINK
    40. 40. High School Students Compose a Video Book Review LINK
    41. 41. Media Literacy Embraces Protection & EmpowermentWhen it comesto children andteens…It’s a two-sidedcoin
    42. 42. Protection
    43. 43. Empowerment
    44. 44. Helping Children and Young PeopleGrow from Passive to Active Users
    45. 45. Access, Create & Analyze & Apply EthicalUse & Share Collaborate Evaluate Judgment
    46. 46. Advice for EducatorsUse & Share Create & Collaborate Analyze & Evaluate Apply Ethical Judgment
    47. 47. Advice #1Identify Learner Needs
    48. 48. Advice #2Manage the Momentum
    49. 49. Advice #3Explore and Document
    50. 50. Advice #4Give it Time to Grow
    51. 51. Book and Website Launch, June 2013 www.mediaeducationlab.com
    52. 52. Digital & Media Literacy: Connecting Classroom to CultureRenee HobbsHarrington School of Communication and MediaUniversity of Rhode Island USAEmail: hobbs@uri.eduTwitter: reneehobbsWeb: http://mediaeducationlab.com
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