Global Developments in Media Literacy

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Renee Hobbs offers an overview of global developments in digital and media literacy education at the Media and Digital Literacy Academy of Beirut (MDLAB), August 19, 2013.

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  •  People of all ages will internalize the practice of asking critical questions about the author, purpose and point of view of every sort of message--- from political campaigns, pharmaceutical advertising, reports and surveys issued by think-tanks, websites, breaking news, email, blogs, and the opinions of politicians, pundits and celebrities.  Teachers will use engaging instructional methods to explore the complex role of news and current events in society, making connections to literature, science, health and history, building bridges between the classroom and the living room that support a lifetime of learning.  People of all ages will be responsible and civil in their communication behaviors, treating others with respect and appreciating the need for social norms of behavior that create a sense of personal accountability for one’s online and offline actions.  As a fundamental part of instruction, students will compose and create authentic messages for real audiences, using digital tools, images, language, sound and interactivity to develop knowledge and skills and discover the power of being an effective communicator.  People from all walks of life will be able to achieve their goals in finding, sharing and using information solve problems, developing the ability to access, analyze, evaluate, communicate and share ideas and information, participating in meaningful social action in their neighborhoods, communities, nation and the world.  In the process, teamwork, collaboration, reflection, ethics and social responsibility will flourish. Teachers won’t have to complain about a generation of young people who lack the ability to identify appropriate keywords for an online search activity, those who aren’t aware of which American city was devastated by Hurricane Katrina, and those who cannot identify the author of a web page.
  •  People of all ages will internalize the practice of asking critical questions about the author, purpose and point of view of every sort of message--- from political campaigns, pharmaceutical advertising, reports and surveys issued by think-tanks, websites, breaking news, email, blogs, and the opinions of politicians, pundits and celebrities.  Teachers will use engaging instructional methods to explore the complex role of news and current events in society, making connections to literature, science, health and history, building bridges between the classroom and the living room that support a lifetime of learning.  People of all ages will be responsible and civil in their communication behaviors, treating others with respect and appreciating the need for social norms of behavior that create a sense of personal accountability for one’s online and offline actions.  As a fundamental part of instruction, students will compose and create authentic messages for real audiences, using digital tools, images, language, sound and interactivity to develop knowledge and skills and discover the power of being an effective communicator.  People from all walks of life will be able to achieve their goals in finding, sharing and using information solve problems, developing the ability to access, analyze, evaluate, communicate and share ideas and information, participating in meaningful social action in their neighborhoods, communities, nation and the world.  In the process, teamwork, collaboration, reflection, ethics and social responsibility will flourish. Teachers won’t have to complain about a generation of young people who lack the ability to identify appropriate keywords for an online search activity, those who aren’t aware of which American city was devastated by Hurricane Katrina, and those who cannot identify the author of a web page.
  • Global Developments in Media Literacy

    1. 1. Global Developments in Media Literacy Education Renee Hobbs Professor and Founding Director Harrington School of Communication and Media University of Rhode Island USA Media & Digital Literacy Academy of Beirut American University of Beirut August 19, 2013
    2. 2. www.mediaeducationlab.com
    3. 3. www. MediaEducationLab.com
    4. 4. Why the Time is Right
    5. 5. Why the Time is Right
    6. 6. Stakeholders in Media & Digital Literacy BUSINESSACTIVIST GOVERNMENTLIBRARY EDUCATIONCREATIVE
    7. 7. Protection - Empowerment: A Two-Sided Coin
    8. 8. ProtectionProtection
    9. 9. Empowerment
    10. 10. What media texts and technology tools do people need?
    11. 11. What do people need to know and be able to do in using Digital & media texts, tools and technologies?
    12. 12. What kinds of content and resources best support people’s information needs?
    13. 13. What kinds of programs and services are most effective?
    14. 14. How do institutions change to meet current and future needs?
    15. 15. TEXTS & TOOLS KNOWLEDGE & COMPETENCY CONTENT RESOURCES PROGRAMS & SERVICES INSTITUTIONAL CHANGE Issues for Policymakers
    16. 16. Can media literacy education promote global understanding?
    17. 17. Global Developments
    18. 18. UNESCO acknowledges that media and information literacy is a constellation of social practices Diverse stakeholders recognize that media convergence is creating a broader understanding of the competencies required for full participation in contemporary society
    19. 19. UNESCO’s Curriculum Areas for MIL 1. Knowledge and understanding of media and information for democratic discourses & social participation 2. Evaluation of media texts & information sources 3. Production and use of media & information
    20. 20. UNESCO’s 10 MIL Pedagogies 1. Asking questions – “issue inquiry” 2. Problem-based learning 3. Scientific inquiry – research 4. Case study 5. Cooperative learning 6. Textual analysis 7. Contextual analysis 8. Translations – transmediation 9. Simulation 10.Production
    21. 21. Ofcom has a statutory duty to promote media literacy. The core focus of our research work is to understand UK adults usage habits and attitudes across TV, radio, internet, mobile phones and games.
    22. 22. The Media Literacy Council (MLC) was formed August 2012 to spearhead public education on media literacy and cyber wellness, and advise the government on the appropriate policy response to an increasingly complex and borderless world of media, technology, consumer expectations and participation.
    23. 23. Media Literacy Education and Inclusive Social Development
 1. Media Education & Social Inclusion 2. Media Education Discipline Construction 3. Media Literacy and Media’s Social Responsibility 4. Media Literacy and Government’s Management Competence CHINA 3rd International Conference of Media Literacy Education Lanzhou, China
    24. 24. The European Commission considers media literacy an important factor for active citizenship
    25. 25. Italy Bulgaria Romania Lithuania Poland Belgium Teachers struggle to find creative ways to use the Internet and social media in the context of primary and secondary education. They are not using other media forms, including newspapers, magazines, films, television, advertising, music or radio.
    26. 26. www.digitalliteracy.gov
    27. 27. Concerns about narrow focus solely on functional or operational skills Risks of conflating teaching about media and teaching through media Concerns about critical analysis practices that are divorced from civic engagement and participation Concerns about scalability, reach and measurement of impact
    28. 28. TEXTS & TOOLS KNOWLEDGE & COMPETENCY CONTENT & RESOURCES PROGRAMS & SERVICES INSTITUTIONAL CHANGE Issues for the Future
    29. 29. www.mediaeducationlab.com CONTACT: Renee Hobbs Professor and Founding Director Harrington School of Communication and Media University of Rhode Island USA Twitter: @reneehobbs Email: hobbs@uri.edu

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