Media Smart Seminar

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Renee Hobbs examines how digital and media literacy can be used in prevention education in grades 4 - 12.

Renee Hobbs examines how digital and media literacy can be used in prevention education in grades 4 - 12.

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  •  People of all ages will internalize the practice of asking critical questions about the author, purpose and point of view of every sort of message--- from political campaigns, pharmaceutical advertising, reports and surveys issued by think-tanks, websites, breaking news, email, blogs, and the opinions of politicians, pundits and celebrities.  Teachers will use engaging instructional methods to explore the complex role of news and current events in society, making connections to literature, science, health and history, building bridges between the classroom and the living room that support a lifetime of learning.  People of all ages will be responsible and civil in their communication behaviors, treating others with respect and appreciating the need for social norms of behavior that create a sense of personal accountability for one’s online and offline actions.  As a fundamental part of instruction, students will compose and create authentic messages for real audiences, using digital tools, images, language, sound and interactivity to develop knowledge and skills and discover the power of being an effective communicator.  People from all walks of life will be able to achieve their goals in finding, sharing and using information solve problems, developing the ability to access, analyze, evaluate, communicate and share ideas and information, participating in meaningful social action in their neighborhoods, communities, nation and the world.  In the process, teamwork, collaboration, reflection, ethics and social responsibility will flourish. Teachers won’t have to complain about a generation of young people who lack the ability to identify appropriate keywords for an online search activity, those who aren’t aware of which American city was devastated by Hurricane Katrina, and those who cannot identify the author of a web page.
  •  People of all ages will internalize the practice of asking critical questions about the author, purpose and point of view of every sort of message--- from political campaigns, pharmaceutical advertising, reports and surveys issued by think-tanks, websites, breaking news, email, blogs, and the opinions of politicians, pundits and celebrities.  Teachers will use engaging instructional methods to explore the complex role of news and current events in society, making connections to literature, science, health and history, building bridges between the classroom and the living room that support a lifetime of learning.  People of all ages will be responsible and civil in their communication behaviors, treating others with respect and appreciating the need for social norms of behavior that create a sense of personal accountability for one’s online and offline actions.  As a fundamental part of instruction, students will compose and create authentic messages for real audiences, using digital tools, images, language, sound and interactivity to develop knowledge and skills and discover the power of being an effective communicator.  People from all walks of life will be able to achieve their goals in finding, sharing and using information solve problems, developing the ability to access, analyze, evaluate, communicate and share ideas and information, participating in meaningful social action in their neighborhoods, communities, nation and the world.  In the process, teamwork, collaboration, reflection, ethics and social responsibility will flourish. Teachers won’t have to complain about a generation of young people who lack the ability to identify appropriate keywords for an online search activity, those who aren’t aware of which American city was devastated by Hurricane Katrina, and those who cannot identify the author of a web page.
  •  We’ll reach underserved youth including those young people who experience the juvenile justice system, who may be among the most vulnerable to negative messages in the media because of the lack of access to supportive adults and other resiliency factors.
  • Please share the White Paper with colleagues and all who see that the time is now – together, we can build a community education movement for digital and media literacy.
  •  People of all ages will internalize the practice of asking critical questions about the author, purpose and point of view of every sort of message--- from political campaigns, pharmaceutical advertising, reports and surveys issued by think-tanks, websites, breaking news, email, blogs, and the opinions of politicians, pundits and celebrities.  Teachers will use engaging instructional methods to explore the complex role of news and current events in society, making connections to literature, science, health and history, building bridges between the classroom and the living room that support a lifetime of learning.  People of all ages will be responsible and civil in their communication behaviors, treating others with respect and appreciating the need for social norms of behavior that create a sense of personal accountability for one’s online and offline actions.  As a fundamental part of instruction, students will compose and create authentic messages for real audiences, using digital tools, images, language, sound and interactivity to develop knowledge and skills and discover the power of being an effective communicator.  People from all walks of life will be able to achieve their goals in finding, sharing and using information solve problems, developing the ability to access, analyze, evaluate, communicate and share ideas and information, participating in meaningful social action in their neighborhoods, communities, nation and the world.  In the process, teamwork, collaboration, reflection, ethics and social responsibility will flourish. Teachers won’t have to complain about a generation of young people who lack the ability to identify appropriate keywords for an online search activity, those who aren’t aware of which American city was devastated by Hurricane Katrina, and those who cannot identify the author of a web page.
  •  People of all ages will internalize the practice of asking critical questions about the author, purpose and point of view of every sort of message--- from political campaigns, pharmaceutical advertising, reports and surveys issued by think-tanks, websites, breaking news, email, blogs, and the opinions of politicians, pundits and celebrities.  Teachers will use engaging instructional methods to explore the complex role of news and current events in society, making connections to literature, science, health and history, building bridges between the classroom and the living room that support a lifetime of learning.  People of all ages will be responsible and civil in their communication behaviors, treating others with respect and appreciating the need for social norms of behavior that create a sense of personal accountability for one’s online and offline actions.  As a fundamental part of instruction, students will compose and create authentic messages for real audiences, using digital tools, images, language, sound and interactivity to develop knowledge and skills and discover the power of being an effective communicator.  People from all walks of life will be able to achieve their goals in finding, sharing and using information solve problems, developing the ability to access, analyze, evaluate, communicate and share ideas and information, participating in meaningful social action in their neighborhoods, communities, nation and the world.  In the process, teamwork, collaboration, reflection, ethics and social responsibility will flourish. Teachers won’t have to complain about a generation of young people who lack the ability to identify appropriate keywords for an online search activity, those who aren’t aware of which American city was devastated by Hurricane Katrina, and those who cannot identify the author of a web page.
  •  People of all ages will internalize the practice of asking critical questions about the author, purpose and point of view of every sort of message--- from political campaigns, pharmaceutical advertising, reports and surveys issued by think-tanks, websites, breaking news, email, blogs, and the opinions of politicians, pundits and celebrities.  Teachers will use engaging instructional methods to explore the complex role of news and current events in society, making connections to literature, science, health and history, building bridges between the classroom and the living room that support a lifetime of learning.  People of all ages will be responsible and civil in their communication behaviors, treating others with respect and appreciating the need for social norms of behavior that create a sense of personal accountability for one’s online and offline actions.  As a fundamental part of instruction, students will compose and create authentic messages for real audiences, using digital tools, images, language, sound and interactivity to develop knowledge and skills and discover the power of being an effective communicator.  People from all walks of life will be able to achieve their goals in finding, sharing and using information solve problems, developing the ability to access, analyze, evaluate, communicate and share ideas and information, participating in meaningful social action in their neighborhoods, communities, nation and the world.  In the process, teamwork, collaboration, reflection, ethics and social responsibility will flourish. Teachers won’t have to complain about a generation of young people who lack the ability to identify appropriate keywords for an online search activity, those who aren’t aware of which American city was devastated by Hurricane Katrina, and those who cannot identify the author of a web page.
  •  People of all ages will internalize the practice of asking critical questions about the author, purpose and point of view of every sort of message--- from political campaigns, pharmaceutical advertising, reports and surveys issued by think-tanks, websites, breaking news, email, blogs, and the opinions of politicians, pundits and celebrities.  Teachers will use engaging instructional methods to explore the complex role of news and current events in society, making connections to literature, science, health and history, building bridges between the classroom and the living room that support a lifetime of learning.  People of all ages will be responsible and civil in their communication behaviors, treating others with respect and appreciating the need for social norms of behavior that create a sense of personal accountability for one’s online and offline actions.  As a fundamental part of instruction, students will compose and create authentic messages for real audiences, using digital tools, images, language, sound and interactivity to develop knowledge and skills and discover the power of being an effective communicator.  People from all walks of life will be able to achieve their goals in finding, sharing and using information solve problems, developing the ability to access, analyze, evaluate, communicate and share ideas and information, participating in meaningful social action in their neighborhoods, communities, nation and the world.  In the process, teamwork, collaboration, reflection, ethics and social responsibility will flourish. Teachers won’t have to complain about a generation of young people who lack the ability to identify appropriate keywords for an online search activity, those who aren’t aware of which American city was devastated by Hurricane Katrina, and those who cannot identify the author of a web page.
  •  People of all ages will internalize the practice of asking critical questions about the author, purpose and point of view of every sort of message--- from political campaigns, pharmaceutical advertising, reports and surveys issued by think-tanks, websites, breaking news, email, blogs, and the opinions of politicians, pundits and celebrities.  Teachers will use engaging instructional methods to explore the complex role of news and current events in society, making connections to literature, science, health and history, building bridges between the classroom and the living room that support a lifetime of learning.  People of all ages will be responsible and civil in their communication behaviors, treating others with respect and appreciating the need for social norms of behavior that create a sense of personal accountability for one’s online and offline actions.  As a fundamental part of instruction, students will compose and create authentic messages for real audiences, using digital tools, images, language, sound and interactivity to develop knowledge and skills and discover the power of being an effective communicator.  People from all walks of life will be able to achieve their goals in finding, sharing and using information solve problems, developing the ability to access, analyze, evaluate, communicate and share ideas and information, participating in meaningful social action in their neighborhoods, communities, nation and the world.  In the process, teamwork, collaboration, reflection, ethics and social responsibility will flourish. Teachers won’t have to complain about a generation of young people who lack the ability to identify appropriate keywords for an online search activity, those who aren’t aware of which American city was devastated by Hurricane Katrina, and those who cannot identify the author of a web page.
  •  People of all ages will internalize the practice of asking critical questions about the author, purpose and point of view of every sort of message--- from political campaigns, pharmaceutical advertising, reports and surveys issued by think-tanks, websites, breaking news, email, blogs, and the opinions of politicians, pundits and celebrities.  Teachers will use engaging instructional methods to explore the complex role of news and current events in society, making connections to literature, science, health and history, building bridges between the classroom and the living room that support a lifetime of learning.  People of all ages will be responsible and civil in their communication behaviors, treating others with respect and appreciating the need for social norms of behavior that create a sense of personal accountability for one’s online and offline actions.  As a fundamental part of instruction, students will compose and create authentic messages for real audiences, using digital tools, images, language, sound and interactivity to develop knowledge and skills and discover the power of being an effective communicator.  People from all walks of life will be able to achieve their goals in finding, sharing and using information solve problems, developing the ability to access, analyze, evaluate, communicate and share ideas and information, participating in meaningful social action in their neighborhoods, communities, nation and the world.  In the process, teamwork, collaboration, reflection, ethics and social responsibility will flourish. Teachers won’t have to complain about a generation of young people who lack the ability to identify appropriate keywords for an online search activity, those who aren’t aware of which American city was devastated by Hurricane Katrina, and those who cannot identify the author of a web page.
  •  People of all ages will be responsible and civil in their communication behaviors, treating others with respect and appreciating the need for social norms of behavior that create a sense of personal accountability for one’s online and offline actions.
  •  We’ll reach underserved youth including those young people who experience the juvenile justice system, who may be among the most vulnerable to negative messages in the media because of the lack of access to supportive adults and other resiliency factors.
  •  We’ll reach underserved youth including those young people who experience the juvenile justice system, who may be among the most vulnerable to negative messages in the media because of the lack of access to supportive adults and other resiliency factors.
  •  People of all ages will internalize the practice of asking critical questions about the author, purpose and point of view of every sort of message--- from political campaigns, pharmaceutical advertising, reports and surveys issued by think-tanks, websites, breaking news, email, blogs, and the opinions of politicians, pundits and celebrities.  Teachers will use engaging instructional methods to explore the complex role of news and current events in society, making connections to literature, science, health and history, building bridges between the classroom and the living room that support a lifetime of learning.  People of all ages will be responsible and civil in their communication behaviors, treating others with respect and appreciating the need for social norms of behavior that create a sense of personal accountability for one’s online and offline actions.  As a fundamental part of instruction, students will compose and create authentic messages for real audiences, using digital tools, images, language, sound and interactivity to develop knowledge and skills and discover the power of being an effective communicator.  People from all walks of life will be able to achieve their goals in finding, sharing and using information solve problems, developing the ability to access, analyze, evaluate, communicate and share ideas and information, participating in meaningful social action in their neighborhoods, communities, nation and the world.  In the process, teamwork, collaboration, reflection, ethics and social responsibility will flourish. Teachers won’t have to complain about a generation of young people who lack the ability to identify appropriate keywords for an online search activity, those who aren’t aware of which American city was devastated by Hurricane Katrina, and those who cannot identify the author of a web page.
  • Examples of this: Science communication – using digital media to help the public understand about climate changeRitchie Garrison, professor of history at the University of Delaware- digitizing early American samplers enlisting technology to connect the public with its cultural legacy.
  • Using technology tools. Do students get to use technology tools for finding information, problem solving, self-expression, and communication? Do assignments progressively deepen their capacity to use tools well? Or is going to the technology lab simply a matter of following directions on a worksheet? Or worse, is it a break from real learning?Gathering information. Do you model effective strategies for finding information from diverse sources? Do you give students opportunities to work independently? Do you give students choices? Or do you make most of the selections on their behalf?Comprehending. Are students challenged to make sense of texts? Do you create a learning climate where students’ interpretations are respected, valued, and shared? Or do you do most of the work of interpreting and explaining?
  • Using technology tools. Do students get to use technology tools for finding information, problem solving, self-expression, and communication? Do assignments progressively deepen their capacity to use tools well? Or is going to the technology lab simply a matter of following directions on a worksheet? Or worse, is it a break from real learning?Gathering information. Do you model effective strategies for finding information from diverse sources? Do you give students opportunities to work independently? Do you give students choices? Or do you make most of the selections on their behalf?Comprehending. Are students challenged to make sense of texts? Do you create a learning climate where students’ interpretations are respected, valued, and shared? Or do you do most of the work of interpreting and explaining?
  • Consider how analysis and evaluation competencies are part of your curriculum:Asking good questions. Do you ask open-ended questions that have no right or wrong answers? Do students’ answers matter in your classroom? Do their questions matter?Gaining knowledge. Do your assignments and activities promote curiosity? Do students get to apply and use the knowledge they are gaining?Contextualizing. Have you framed your curriculum around an essential question, one that touches hearts and souls, one that helps to define what it means to be human? In doing this, do students get to strengthen their understanding of political, social, economic, and cultural contexts that shape interpretation?
  • Consider how analysis and evaluation competencies are part of your curriculum:Asking good questions. Do you ask open-ended questions that have no right or wrong answers? Do students’ answers matter in your classroom? Do their questions matter?Gaining knowledge. Do your assignments and activities promote curiosity? Do students get to apply and use the knowledge they are gaining?Contextualizing. Have you framed your curriculum around an essential question, one that touches hearts and souls, one that helps to define what it means to be human? In doing this, do students get to strengthen their understanding of political, social, economic, and cultural contexts that shape interpretation?
  • Every teacher must consider how communication and composition are part of their teaching goals:Expression in multiple modes. Do students get to use different genres, including narrative, persuasive, and expository forms? Do they get to use image, language, sound, graphic design, performance, and interactivity to get their message across?Authentic audiences. Do students get to use literacy practices in ways that are meaningful forms of communication? Do they “talk back” to texts? Or do they primarily summarize and reproduce the ideas they encounter? Does their work reach real audiences, or is it created as an exercise for the teacher to grade and return?Content and form in relation to purpose and audience. Do students get to shape a message’s content based on their purpose and intended target audience? Or do students learn only standard forms, like the lab report, the research paper, the worksheet, or the five-paragraph essay?
  • Every teacher must consider how communication and composition are part of their teaching goals:Expression in multiple modes. Do students get to use different genres, including narrative, persuasive, and expository forms? Do they get to use image, language, sound, graphic design, performance, and interactivity to get their message across?Authentic audiences. Do students get to use literacy practices in ways that are meaningful forms of communication? Do they “talk back” to texts? Or do they primarily summarize and reproduce the ideas they encounter? Does their work reach real audiences, or is it created as an exercise for the teacher to grade and return?Content and form in relation to purpose and audience. Do students get to shape a message’s content based on their purpose and intended target audience? Or do students learn only standard forms, like the lab report, the research paper, the worksheet, or the five-paragraph essay?
  • Teachers can support students’ ethical, social, and emotional development when they do the following:Encourage multiperspectival thinking. Do students get to imagine the thoughts, feelings, and ideas of others? Are they encouraged to move beyond either–or thinking? Do they get safe opportunities to share their feelings and listen to others? Do they practice building empathy by reflecting on the experience of standing in someone else’s shoes?Predict consequences and use hypothetical reasoning. Do students get to investigate the genuine conflicts they experience in the world outside the classroom? Do they get to apply reasoning skills to the challenges of daily life, especially in relation to communication and social relationships?Talk about power and responsibility. Do students get to examine how social status, hierarchy, respect, and power are exercised through communication practices, including praise, criticism, and gossip? Do they get to reflect on how our own communication behaviors shape the way we are treated by others?
  • Teachers can support students’ ethical, social, and emotional development when they do the following:Encourage multiperspectival thinking. Do students get to imagine the thoughts, feelings, and ideas of others? Are they encouraged to move beyond either–or thinking? Do they get safe opportunities to share their feelings and listen to others? Do they practice building empathy by reflecting on the experience of standing in someone else’s shoes?Predict consequences and use hypothetical reasoning. Do students get to investigate the genuine conflicts they experience in the world outside the classroom? Do they get to apply reasoning skills to the challenges of daily life, especially in relation to communication and social relationships?Talk about power and responsibility. Do students get to examine how social status, hierarchy, respect, and power are exercised through communication practices, including praise, criticism, and gossip? Do they get to reflect on how our own communication behaviors shape the way we are treated by others?
  •  Connect the classroom to the world. Do classroom activities connect to relevant social issues, debates, and controversies in the world outside the classroom? Do students take action to address meaningful real-world problems that require solutions?Support leadership and collaboration. Do students get to use problem-solving skills to influence more than one person toward a goal? Do they recognize how to leverage the strengths of others to accomplish a common goal?Develop integrity and accountability. Are students held accountable for their actions? Are situations and opportunities provided that enable students to discover how personal values like honesty and courtesy benefit the individual, the group, and the society?
  •  Connect the classroom to the world. Do classroom activities connect to relevant social issues, debates, and controversies in the world outside the classroom? Do students take action to address meaningful real-world problems that require solutions?Support leadership and collaboration. Do students get to use problem-solving skills to influence more than one person toward a goal? Do they recognize how to leverage the strengths of others to accomplish a common goal?Develop integrity and accountability. Are students held accountable for their actions? Are situations and opportunities provided that enable students to discover how personal values like honesty and courtesy benefit the individual, the group, and the society?

Media Smart Seminar Media Smart Seminar Presentation Transcript

  • 7th Annual Media Literacy Seminar Presented by Renee Hobbs University of Rhode Island
  • Media and the Cultural Environment Media is part of the cultural environment that affects healthy development: • • • • Self-Awareness & Acceptance Growth & Development Body Knowledge and Care Personal and Social Relationships • Strategies for Healthy Living
  • Media Affects Attitudes & Behaviors Nutrition Substance Abuse Stereotypes
  • Media Affects Attitudes & Behaviors Sexuality Aggression Online Social Responsibility
  • http://medialiteracyguide.org
  • Front Matter PA State Standards Lesson 1: Positive and Negative Messages in the Media Lesson 3: Advertising by the Numbers Lesson 4: Deconstructing an Advertisement
  • Captain Morgan Rum The company spent $14.5 million to advertise Captain Morgan rum on television, magazines, radio, newspaper, and the Internet.
  • Analyze an Alcohol Ad 1. Color & Design How is color used to attract your attention? What kinds of technologies were used to construct this message?
  • 2. Language “The Captain was here. Don’t drink until you’re 21. Captain’s orders.” What comes to mind when you see these words and phrases? What feelings do you experience when looking at the picture?
  • 3. Relationships What inferences (educated guesses) can you make about the people pictured in this ad? What kind of relationship do you think they have?
  • 4. Subtext The ad suggests a meaning. It doesn’t state the meaning directly. What are some possible messages that the advertiser wants you to think or feel after viewing this ad?
  • 4. Subtext I can’t wait to be 21 so I can drink alcohol.
  • 4. Subtext I can’t wait to be 21 so I can drink alcohol. A girl who drinks alcohol will dress and act in a sexual way.
  • 4. Subtext I can’t wait to be 21 so I can drink alcohol. A girl who drinks alcohol will dress and act in a sexual way. Girls who drink alcohol are attractive and fun to be with.
  • 4. Subtext I can’t wait to be 21 so I can drink alcohol. A girl who drinks alcohol will dress and act in a sexual way. Girls who drink alcohol are attractive and fun to be with.
  • 5. Accuracy I can’t wait to be 21 so I can drink alcohol. A girl who drinks alcohol will dress and act in a sexual way. Girls who drink alcohol are attractive and fun to be with. What is accurate or false What is true and inaccurate about these about these subtext messages? subtext messages?
  • Captain Morgan Deconstructed 1. Color & Design Red is a big contrast with the dark colors of the outdoor, nighttime setting. The drawn cartoon character and cartoon-like boots contrast with the realistic photograph. 2. Language The slogan is used on many Captain Morgan ads– it’s familiar to people. The phrase, “Don’t drink until you’re 21” makes drinking seem like an adult activity. But the girl depicted in the photo looks like a teen. 3. Relationships The Captain looks interested in the girl. She’s the center of attention. 4. Subtext •You’ll get attention if you drink alcohol. •You can dress and act outrageously if you drink alcohol. 5. Accuracy When people drink, they can do stupid things to make themselves the center of attention – in a very negative and dangerous way.
  • a media text using full sentences to analyze using some of the key concepts and critical questions a poster to share your analysis with the group  your poster and receive feedback on your ideas
  • Last Friday Night (T.G.I.F.)
  •  I can brainstorm and share ideas in a collaborative team  I can critically analyze a media message using concepts including: color & design techniques language relationships subtext accuracy  I understand how and why media depicts substance abuse in realistic & unrealistic ways
  • Promoting Critical Thinking Authors & Audiences Messages & Meanings Representations & Realities
  • Media Literacy is an Expanded Conceptualization of Literacy SPEAKING -- LISTENING READING – WRITING CRITICAL VIEWING – MEDIA COMPOSITION
  • BEHIND THE SCENES
  • Stakeholders in Digital & Media Literacy TECH BUSINESS GOVERNMENT EDUCATION ACTIVIST LIBRARY PREVENTION
  • NEW TOOLS
  • Texts of Digital & Media Literacy WHY THE TIME IS RIGHT
  • NEW TOOLS NEW TEXTS
  • video moving-image
  • music & sound
  • entertainment
  • journalism
  • videogames
  • NEW TEXTS NEW TOOLS NEW RELATIONSHIPS
  • social media
  • Everyone’s An Author LINK
  • Everyone’s An Author
  • Everyone’s An Author
  • Human Development & Socialization are Lifelong Processes
  • Human Development & Socialization are Lifelong Processes
  • Human Development & Socialization are Lifelong Processes
  • How do Media Influence Us? Family Peers Community
  • Protection
  • Empowerment
  • Developmental Characteristics of Adolescence Take Risks in Pursuit of Experience Love Experience for its Own Sake Go After Novelty, Complexity and Intense Situations
  • Searching for the Sensational
  • Escaping to Alternative Worlds
  • Playing with Identity
  • Speaking Out as a Civic Actor
  • Developing Emotional Reasoning
  • Understanding & Using Social Power Fitting In Standing Out
  • Transgressing Social Norms
  • Talking to Anyone about Anything ... and keeping secrets from parents and adults LINK
  • Ignore Engage Learning from Popular Culture
  • Digital and media literacy embraces interdisciplinary connections across school, campus and community
  • Glorify or Warn?
  • Glorify or Warn?
  • Introducing the Media Literacy Mobile
  • Introducing the Media Literacy Mobile
  • One Expansive Conceptualization to Unite Them All Key Concepts
  • One Expansive Conceptualization to Unite Them All Key Concepts
  • Messages are Representations
  • Messages are Representations Messages Use Different Codes and Conventions
  • People Interpret Messages Differently Messages Use Different Codes and Conventions Messages are Representations
  • People Interpret Messages Differently Messages Have Economic & Political Power Messages Use Different Codes and Conventions Messages are Representations
  • People Interpret Messages Differently Messages are Representations Messages Have Economic & Political Power Messages Use Different Codes and Conventions Messages Influence our Attitudes and Behaviors
  • One Expansive Conceptualization to Unite Them All Learning Process Key Concepts
  • The Learning Process of Digital & Media Literacy REFLECT ACCESS ANALYZE CREATE ACT
  • Learning Process Comprehend and Make Sense of All Sorts of Texts Use Technology Tools Well ACCESS Gather Information Independently
  • ACCESS Find information on a topic & examine the quality of source material
  • Learning Process Ask Good Questions Evaluate the Quality & Value of Messages ANALYZE Explore Context in Meaningful Ways
  • ANALYZE LINK Analyze a media message
  • Learning Process Use Multiple Modes of Expression Reach Authentic Audiences COMPOSE Manipulate Content and Form in Relation to Purpose and Audience
  • COMPOSE
  • Learning Process Activate Multiperspectival Thinking Predict Consequences and Use Hypothetical Reasoning REFLECT Examine Issues of Power and Responsibility
  • REFLECT LINK Discuss the ethical dimensions of a media message
  • Learning Process Connect the Classroom to the World Strengthen Leadership and Collaboration ACT Develop Integrity and Accountability
  • Learning Process ACT
  • Transforming Education Through Digital & Media Literacy ACCESS ANALYZE CREATE ACT REFLECT
  • Renee Hobbs, Ed.D. Professor & Founding Director Definitions of Harrington School of Communication & Media Digital LiteracyUniversity of Rhode Island Email: hobbs@uri.edu Twitter: reneehobbs www. mediaeducationlab.com