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081118 - Viral Marketing
 

081118 - Viral Marketing

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Presentation on viral marketing that I gave at La Salle Business & Engineering School

Presentation on viral marketing that I gave at La Salle Business & Engineering School

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081118 - Viral Marketing 081118 - Viral Marketing Presentation Transcript

  • VIRAL MARKETING DIGITAL Waggener Edstrom Worldwide |Ged Carroll |November 18, 2008
  • VIRAL MARKETING:
    • What viral marketing
    • What viral marketing isn’t
    • Going in with your eyes open
    • Factors for success
    • Considerations
    • Going viral for the wrong reasons
    • Case studies
    • Questions
  • WHAT IS VIRAL MARKETING
    • A marketing phenomena that facilitates and encourages people to pass along a marketing message voluntarily
    • Attention economy
    • Content comes in many formats
      • Games
      • Video clips
      • Brandable software
      • Images
      • Text messages
      • Vouchers
  • WHAT VIRAL MARKETING ISN’T
    • Free marketing
    • Easy to do
    • A guaranteed success
    • A great mechanism for direct response marketing (generally)
    • Infinitively sustainable
    • A way to dupe or deceive consumers
  • GOING IN WITH YOUR EYES WIDE OPEN
    • Only 15 per cent of advertisers reached the goal of prompting consumers to pass along their messages for them - JupiterResearch Viral Marketing – Bring the Message to the Masses
    • Relatively older online users are more likely than relatively younger users to forward advertising messages to friends or tell friends about ads
    • Different influential groups not only respond very differently to advertising campaigns, but also influence others in very different ways and through different means
    • Failure to truly understand the audience means that a campaign is as likely to alienate an audience as influence it
    • Brands attempting to reach outside their brand images or target demographics and only end up looking like they are trying too hard
  • FACTORS FOR SUCCESS
    • Brevity
    • Don’t try too hard – the audience needs to get it
    • Don’t make an outright ad unless you have amazing content
    • Do provide people with an opportunity to remix your content – carrying on the discussion
    • Do invest in great content
    • Don’t put all your eggs in one basket
    • Do think about Social Network Potential / Super Nodes
    • Do not allow a creative idea to be watered down by too much internal discussion
    • Tactics that work
      • Shock
      • Fake headlines
      • Appeal to sex
      • Incite a debate
    • Do seed and promote: blogs, forums, social networks, email list, friends
    • Think carefully about a content release strategy
    • Luck
  • CONSIDERATIONS
    • What are you trying to achieve?
    • Who are you trying to influence?
    • What understanding do you have about them?
    • What other audiences could see this content?
    • What is the reward to me as a consumer for engaging with your content
    • What is the opportunity cost vis-à-vis other marketing tactics?
    • What will this do to your brand?
    • What legal constraints do you operate under?
    • What organisational constraints do you operate under?
    • What’s next?
    • What will do if it doesn’t work?
  • GOING VIRAL FOR THE WRONG REASONS
    • Going against brand values
    • Offending stakeholder groups
    • Conducting an activity that is considered to be in bad taste
    • Being seen as dishonest
  • CASE STUDIES
  • NISSAN
    • Ni ssan Motor Company of Japan ordered its Israeli distributor to pull an advert that shows Arab businessmen venting anger at the fuel efficency of a Nissan Tiida car
    • The video went up on YouTube in July and was widely seen throughout the Arab world
    • Boycotts of Nissan products were started by Arab consumers
    • " We need to apply punishments... against these things. In order for Nissan to keep its interests in the region, it must apologize .” Saudi government spokesperson Hani al-Wafa
  • SONY BRAVIA BALLS
    • Ad agency looked at a way of visualising the colour difference of Sony Bravia TVs and came up with an ad spot
    • The high production value of the ad and the creativity of the film garnered 4.3 million views in 2006 on YouTube
    • Improved brand and advert recall and Sony had a 15 per cent rise in sales
  • BURGER KING WHOPPER
    • Burger King’s signature dish is the Whopper. This campaign was done by Crispin Porter + Bogusky.
    • A Whopper-free Burger King is set up.
    • Customers are being told: we are very sorry, Burger King discontinued the Whopper.
    • The reactions of real customers, taped with hidden cameras and a fake TV news crew!
    • Some customers get really very angry and some tell great stories about Burger King
    • Day 2: customers Whoppers are swapped for other chains burgers – more anger ensues
  • CADBURY GORILLA
    • Cadbury Dairy Milk chocolate sales had been hit by a salmonella outbreak
    • The company needed to get the brand back in front of people and meaning something more than food poisoning
    • It needed to spur discussion, there are 63 response videos on YouTube and the original has been viewed 3.2 million times
    • 70 Facebook groups set up in appreciation of the gorilla
    • A 9% year on year increase in sales
  • BIBLIOGRAPHY
    • Media Virus by Douglas Rushkoff
  • © Waggener Edstrom Worldwide 2008