Factories%20 act%201948

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  • This legislation is being enforced by technical officers i.e. Inspectors of Factories, Dy. Chief Inspectors of Factories who work under the control of the Chief Inspector of Factories and overall control of the Labour Commissioner, Government of National Capital Territory of Delhi
  • This legislation is being enforced by technical officers i.e. Inspectors of Factories, Dy. Chief Inspectors of Factories who work under the control of the Chief Inspector of Factories and overall control of the Labour Commissioner, Government of National Capital Territory of Delhi
  • Factories%20 act%201948

    1. 1. Group 1 Ms. Mita Vora – Roll no. 1Mrs.Monica Shrivastava – Roll no. 4Mr.Dharmvir Marchino – Roll no. 5
    2. 2.  The Factories Act, is a social legislation which has been enacted for occupational safety, health and welfare of workers at work places. Applicability: It applies to factories covered under the Factories Act, 1948. Background: In India the first Factories Act was passed in 1881. This Act was basically designed to protect children and to provide few measures for health and safety of the workers. This law was applicable to only those factories, which employed 100 or more workers. In 1891 another factories Act was passed which extended to the factories employing 50 or more workers. On the basis of the recommendations of the Factory Labour Commission, more comprehensive Law was introduced in 1911, which got amended in 1923, 1926 and 1931 With the amendments made by Royal Commission of Labour (1931), Comprehensive Factory Act, 1934 was introduced. Following recommendations of the Rage Committee, the Govt. of India enacted Factories Act, 1948
    3. 3.  The term “Factory” under Section 2(m) of the act means :  Any premises in which 10 or more workers are employed and are engaged in manufacturing process being carried out with the aid of power or  Any premises in which 20 or more workers are employed in manufacturing process being carried out without the aid of power The term “Power” under Section 2(g) of the act means not only electrical energy but also any other form of energy, which is mechanically transmitted, but is not generated by human or animal energy The term “Manufacturing Process” under Section 2(K) of the act means :  Making, altering, repairing, ornamenting, finishing, packing, oiling, washing, cleaning, breaking up, demolishing or otherwise treating or adapting any article or substance with a view to its use, sale, transport, delivery or disposal; or  Pumping oil, water, sewage or any other substance; or  Generating, transforming or transmitting power; or  Composing types for printing, by letter press, litho-graphy or other similar processes; or  Constructing, reconstructing, repairing, refitting or breaking up ships or vessels; or  Preserving or storing any article in cold storage
    4. 4.  Factory does not include a mine, a mobile unit belonging to the armed forces of the union, a railway running shed or a hotel, restaurant or eating place The following have held to be a factory:-  Salt works  A shed for ginning and pressing of cotton  A Bidi making shed  A Railway Workshop  Composing work for Letter Press Printing  Saw Mills  Place for preparation of foodstuff and other eatables  Water works maintained by a municipality  Electricity department of municipality The term “Worker” under Section 2(I) of the act means a person employed (Directly or through any agency including a contractor), with or without the knowledge of principal employer, whether for remuneration or not in any manufacturing or not in manufacturing process, but does not include any member of the armed forces of the Union
    5. 5.  The term “Occupier” under Section 2(n) of the act means the person who has ultimate control over the affairs of the factory; and  In case of a firm or other association of individuals, any one of the individual partners or members thereof shall be deemed to be the Occupier  In case of a company, any one of the directors shall be deemed to be the occupier  In case of a factory owned or controlled by the Central govt. or state govt. or any local authority, the person/s appointed to manage the affairs of the factory shall be deemed to be the occupier.
    6. 6.  As per Section 6 and Rule 3, the plans of a factory has to be approved by Chief Inspector of Factories. Occupier or manager of a factory has to apply for registration & get the licence from Chief Inspector of Factories. As per Section 6 and Rules 5 to 13, the licence so granted may be amended, renewed, revoked or suspended in accordance with the rules framed under the act. As per Section 9, Inspector appointed under this Act can any time enter the factory  To carry out duties as laid down under Section 9(b) and (c);  To ensure that statutory provisions and rules framed are carried out properly;  To launch prosecutions against factory owners under the provision of Chapter X of the act.
    7. 7.  The main restrictive provisions of the Act about the working hours of Adults are:  Section 51- A worker can not be employed for more than 48 hours in a week  Section 52- A holiday must be given in every week  Section 53- Compensatory holidays in case of missing of weekly holiday  Section 54- A worker can not be employed for more than 9 hours a day  Section 55- A worker must be given an interval of rest of at least half an hour after 5 hours of work  Section 56- The total period of work, inclusive of rest interval, must not be spread over more than 10 ½ hours a day  Section 59- If a worker works for more than 9 hours a day or more than 48 hours a week, he shall be paid for overtime @ twice the regular wage
    8. 8.  In case of any exemption, under Section 64, the state government shall not exceed the following limits of work, inclusive of over-time  The total no. of hours of work in any day shall not exceed 10  The spread over, inclusive of the interval of rest, shall not exceed 12 houra in any day  The total no. of hours in a week, including over time shall not exceed 60  The total no. of hours of over time shall not exceed 50 in any quarter The main restrictive provisions of the Act about women & children employment under Section 66 to 71 are:  A woman worker can not be employed except between the hours of 6 a.m. to 7. p.m.  The employment of child below 14 yrs is strictly prohibited  A child between 14 to 15 yrs of age can be employed for a maximum period of 4 ½ hours in a day  A child can not be employed during night (From 10 p.m. to 6 a.m.)  A child worker must have fitness certificate granted by a Certifying Surgeon  A child between age of 15 to 18 yrs, having fitness certificate to perform full days work can be employed as an adult
    9. 9.  The main provisions of the Act about the grant of annual leave with wages under Section 79 are:  A worker shall be allowed in every calendar year, annual leave with wages @ 1 day for every 20 days of work performed by him during the previous calendar year  In case of child worker, annual leave with wages @ 1 day for every 15 days of work performed  Leave can be accumulated upto 30 days in case of an adult or 40 days in case of a child  The leave admissible will be exclusive of all holidays, occurring during, or at either end of the leave period  Wages for leave allowed shall be paid before the leave begins  In case of a worker who is discharged or dismissed from service, quits or dies while in service, he or his heir or nominees must be paid wages in lieu of annual leave. In such case, the annual leave is to be calculated at the same rate as above but irrespective of whether the worker has worked for 240 days or not.
    10. 10.  Under Section 111, various obligations of a worker are:  A worker shall not interfere with or misuse any appliance or other thing provided for the purpose of securing the health, safety or welfare of the workers.  A worker shall not willfully and without reasonable cause do anything likely to endanger himself or others  A worker shall not willfully neglect to make use of any appliance or other thing provided for the purpose of securing the health or safety of the workers. On contravention of above provisions, the worker shall be punishable with imprisonment upto 3 months, or with fine upto Rs. 100 or with both
    11. 11.  Obtain government approval regarding location, plan and construction of the factory an also licence and registration certificate for operating the factory Implement all provisions concerning health, safety and welfare Send a detailed written notice 15 days in advance to Chief Inspector before occupying any premises as a factory. Comply all statutory requirements pertaining to hours of work, leave with wages, weekly holidays and extra wages for overtime Display notice, maintain registers and records and submit returns as required under the Act Report fatal and other accidents, and occupational disease contracted by any workman, to the government or specified authority
    12. 12.  The Factories Act, is the most comprehensive piece of labour legislation Though it is a piece of central legislation, the responsibility for administration of the Act rests with the State Governments who administer it through their own factory inspectorates. The state government appoint appropriately qualified persons as inspectors/ certifying surgeons. In addition, every district Magistrate is the inspector for his district Uniformity in the administration of the Act is achieved by the model rules framed by the Directorate General of Factory Advice Service & Labour Institutes (DGFASALI)
    13. 13. OFFENCES PENALTIESFor contravention of the Provisions of the Act Imprisonment up to 2 years or fine up toor Rules Rs.1,00,000 or bothOn Continuation of contravention Rs.1000 per dayOn contravention of Chapter IV pertaining to Not less than Rs.25000 in case of death.safety or dangerous operations.Subsequent contravention of some Not less than Rs.5000 in case of seriousprovisions injuries.Obstructing Inspectors Imprisonment up to 3 years or fine not less than Rs.10,000 which may extend to Rs.2,00,000.Wrongful disclosing result pertaining to Imprisonment up to 6 months or fine up toresults of analysis. Rs.10,000 or both.For contravention of the provisions of Imprisonment up to 7 years with fine up toSec.41B, 41C and 41H pertaining to Rs.2,00,000 and on continuation fine @ Rs.5,compulsory disclosure of information by 000 per day.occupier, specific responsibility of occupier or Imprisonment of 10 years whenright of workers to work imminent danger. contravention continues for one year.
    14. 14.  Approval of Factory Building Plans before construction/extension, under the Delhi Factories Rules, 1950 . Grant of Licences under the Delhi Factories Rules, 1950, and to take action against factories running without obtaining Licence. Renewal of Licences granted under the Delhi Factories Rules, 1950, by the Dy. Chief Inspectors of Factories . Inspections of factories by District Inspectors of Factories, for investigation of complaints, serious/fatal accidents as well as suo moto inspections to check compliance of provisions of this Act relating to :-  Health  Safety  Welfare facilities  Working hours  Employment of young persons  Annual Leave with wages etc.
    15. 15. 1) Sun-cured tobacco leaves are subjected to processes of moistening, stripping, breaking up, adaptation, packing, and so on, with a view to transporting them to the companys main factory for their use in manufacturing cigarettes. Does it amount to a `manufacturing process under the Factories Act, 1948? It amounts to a manufacturing process defined in Section 2 (k) of the Factories Act, 19482) Mohan meets with an accident on a public road on his way to the place of employment. Does it amount to `employment injury entitling him to benefits under the Employees State Insurance Act, 1948? Mohan is not entitled to benefits under the Act. The Supreme Court, in Regional Director ESI vs Francis de Costa, held that was road accident on a public road while the employee was on his way to the place of employment. It cannot be said to have its origin in his employment in the factory. It cannot be said to be caused by an accident out of and in the course of employment.

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