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English 9 Second Semester

English 9 Second Semester

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    Week of january24 Week of january24 Presentation Transcript

    • English 9, Week 1 January 24-27 Mrs. Navejar Ms. Dammanna Mr. Huth
    • Common Core State Standards-ELA Key Ideas and Details • RL.9-10.1. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. Craft and Structure • RL.9-10.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language evokes a sense of time and place; how it sets a formal or informal tone). Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity • RL.9-10.10. By the end of grade 9, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 9–10 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range. Language L.9-10.5. Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings. – Interpret figures of speech (e.g., euphemism, oxymoron) in context and analyze their role in the text. – Analyze nuances in the meaning of words with similar denotations. Speaking and Listening Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas.
    • Tuesday, January 24th• Welcome!• Take attendance/check your schedule – Are you in the right class? – Room 375- Mrs. Navejar• Look at the tent cards on the desk for your assigned seat• Please take out – Notebook – Pencil or pen• Wait for class to start – Bell rings
    • Tuesday, January 24th Introductions• Instructors in the room – Mrs. Navejar – Ms. Dammanna – Mr. Huth• English 9/Second Semester• Today we will: – Course Overview – Grading Policy – Grade Scale – Required Class materials – Classroom expectations
    • Welcome to English 9! A Few Things to Remember• Take notes• Attendance is critical, be on time• Be prepared, always bring required materials• No cell phones or electronic devices• Enter the classroom and begin work quietly• If you respect your fellow students, teachers, and environment, you will be respected too• All Hamilton HS conduct rules apply in this class• Take notes
    • Instructors• Instructors in the room – Mrs. Navejar – Ms. Dammanna – Mr. Huth• Mrs. Navejar – B.A. -Mount Mary College • English/History Middle-Secondary Education – M.S.- UW-Madison • Educational Psychology – Ph.D doctoral student- UW-Milwaukee • Educational Psychology- learning and development – MPS Teacher for 12 years • 10 years at Pulaski • I’m in my 3rd year at Hamilton High School• Ms. Dammanna• Mr. Huth
    • Who Am I?• Mr. Huth (rhymes with “youth”)• B.A., English, UWM• B.A., Art History, UWM• Worked as a librarian at Marquette U.• Worked in the IT industry• Finishing my teaching license at UWM• Loves swimming, hiking, travelling, reading, going to galleries and museums, movies, trying new food• Favorite city: London• Favorite TV shows: The Sopranos, Monty Python, Doctor Who• Favorite movie: Pulp Fiction• Favorite book: Bleak House, by Charles Dickens• Favorite music: The Clash, Patti Smith, Mozart, Woody Guthrie, Nick Cave, Tom Waits• Favorite team: Green Bay Packers
    • Course Description *Look at syllabus*• The central purpose of this course is to expand students’ foundational skills in all communication arts.• These include reading, analyzing literature, writing, listening, speaking, discussing, using language, understanding media, using technology, and employing research skills.• Students will apply these skills as they continue to develop their abilities as creative and critical thinkers.• The goal of this course is to engage students in a meaningful survey of various genres of literature and writing.• Equipping students with effective foundational reading and writing skills is paramount. There are no prerequisites for this course.
    • 21st Century Grading Policy• Hamilton is enforcing the 21st Century Grading Policy. A student’s grade is dependent upon several factors.• Foremost, the grade is determined by academic achievement during the mark period.• High quality work is achieved through the daily practice and review of class skills and ideas learned during the class hour.• A student’s grade is dependent upon active daily participation and skills mastery based upon standards which require regular attendance.
    • Grade Scale• Advanced: Demonstrates in-depth understanding of academic knowledge and skills tested at the 9th grade level.• Proficient: Demonstrates competency in the academic knowledge and skills tested at the 9th grade level.• Basic: Demonstrates some academic knowledge and skills tested at the 9th grade level.• Minimal Performance: Demonstrates very limited academic knowledge and skills tested at the 9th grade level.
    • Required items to bring to classYou must bring:1. A sharpened pencil or pen2. A notebook that you will keep in the class (notebooks are .50 in the bookstore)3. A folder
    • Classroom Expectations1. Please arrive on time. If you are late, enter in quietly. Students who are repeatedly late will require disciplinary action.2. This classroom is a “safe-zone”. We do not allow students to make fun of others, or make them feel unsafe in any way. We believe that each student deserves the right to learn in an environment where we can all relax, have fun, learn, and be equals.3. Come prepared to learn. We have designed this class in an “honors” format. We have high expectations, and we expect each student will arrive with the necessary materials and attitudes to fully realize themselves as successful scholars.4. Hamilton High School and room 375 has a no cell phone policy. Do not take out your phone for any reason. Students who break this important school rule will be taken to the administrator.
    • Classroom Procedures• Start taking notes Summarize in your note book: • Objectives • I’m learning: ________ • I will know I learned because I can: ___ • I want to know: _____ • I have questions about: _____
    • Speaking and Listening• Speaking and Listening are parts of your grade• What does “speaking” look like? – Reflect on the question (think time) – Write down a response before you speak (prepare) – Raise your hand (we want to give everyone a chance)• What does listening look like? – Why is it important to hear everyone’s thoughts and opinions? – What are your experiences with people who “hog” the conversation? – How do you feel when people interrupt you? Talk over you? – The body language of listening • Looking at the speaker • The white of your eyes should be facing the speaker • Do not write or play with items on your desk when someone is speaking
    • What if…• What do I do if I get bored? _________• What do I do if I get tired? __________• What if another student is bothering me?_______• What if I’m not doing well in the class and I want to try to improve my grade?____
    • Who Are You? *Handout*• Take about 7 minutes to fill out the handout• Turn to your neighbor and share 3 things about yourself you are willing to share• Introduce yourself and your neighbor to the class, and tell us one thing about your neighbor• “Hi, my name is Regina. I would like to introduce Aaron. He likes London, cats, and reading.”
    • 1. Sit down2. Take out your notebook3. Write down the following notes in your notebook (you have three minutes):Lesson Objective (Write down the following)I am learning--How to read and listen to poetry--How to write a response to poetry--How to discuss poetryI am doing--Reading and listening--Writing--DiscussingI know I learned because--I can…--I can…I have questions about…
    • Terms and DefinitionsFree Verse: Verse without formal meter or rhyme patterns. Free verse reliesupon the natural rhythms of everyday speech. Modern and contemporarypoets of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries often employ free verse.Figurative Language: A form of language use in which writers and speakersconvey something other than the literal meaning of their words in order toshow an imaginative relationship between different things. Simile, metaphor,and personification are examples of figurative language.Simile: A figure of speech involving a comparison between unlike things usingthe words like or as. An example is "My love is like a red, red rose.“Metaphor: A comparison between essentially unlike things withoutcomparative words such as like or as. An example is "My love is a red, redrose."Personification: A type of figurative language in which inanimate objects orabstract ideas are given human characteristics. Personification is a form ofmetaphor.Imagery: The creation of images using words. Poets usually achieve this byinvoking comparisons by means of metaphor or simile or other figures of
    • Terms and Definitions 2• Alliteration The repetition of consonant sounds, especially at the beginning of words. Brenda’s got a baby, but Brenda’s barely got a brain.• Rhythm The recurrence of accent or stress in lines of verse. In the following lines from "Same in Blues" by Langston Hughes, the accented words and syllables are underlined: I said to my baby, (6) Baby take it slow.... (5) Lulu said to Leonard (6) I want a diamond ring (6)• Diction The selection of words in a literary work. A works diction forms one of its centrally important literary elements, as writers use words to convey action, reveal character, imply attitudes, identify themes, and suggest values.
    • Thursday, January 26th1. Review expectations2. You need a notebook for this class and keep one in here (with your name on it) -I need to get 5 boxes -dividers3. Pens/Pencils required4. Begin taking notes as soon as you come in
    • Thursday, January 26thReview what we did yesterday 1. Handout 1- Poetry Observation form -worth 11 points - we’re interested in learning what you think, feel and know about poetry 2. We wrote down our learning objectives - get notes from a partner 3. We began reading poetry - all classes read Jack Kerouack (as read by Johnny Depp) except period 7/8 Preview 1. You took notes 2. We will briefly review notes 3. We will re-read Mexico City Blues a. Look for literary terms you wrote down in your notes in the poem4. We will move on to The X is Black a. Look for literary terms you wrote down in your notes n the poem****All of your responses will go in your notebook*** We will collect either your responses or your notebook when we enter in your grades. Title each assignment correctly. ****Extra credit: Bring in a song/lyrics and music so we can see what you consider poetry
    • Terms and Definitions 2 *sit and write down notes*• Alliteration The repetition of consonant sounds, especially at the beginning of words. Brenda’s got a baby, but Brenda’s barely got a brain.• Rhythm The recurrence of accent or stress in lines of verse. In the following lines from "Same in Blues" by Langston Hughes, the accented words and syllables are underlined: I said to my baby, (6) Baby take it slow.... (5) Lulu said to Leonard (6) I want a diamond ring (6)• Diction The selection of words in a literary work. A works diction forms one of its centrally important literary elements, as writers use words to convey action, reveal character, imply attitudes, identify themes, and suggest values.
    • Friday, January 27th• Go over our learning objectives• Review yesterday’s poetry terms• Review Mexican City Blues – What terms did we discover• Preview today’s activities – Review terms you wrote down today• Listen/read "A Three Point Shot from Andromeda" by Paul Beatty (11:17 PM) – Identify terms used in this poem – Extra credit for going back to yesterday’s terms and finding them in Andromeda’s poem • E.g. Image: ninety nine thousand/ BB sized holes
    • 1. Sit down2. Take out your notebook3. Write down the following notes in your notebook (you have three minutes):Lesson Objective (Write down the following)I am learning--How to read and listen to poetry--How to write a response to poetry--How to discuss poetryI am doing--Reading and listening--Writing--DiscussingI know I learned because--I can identify the following terms…--I can…I have questions about…
    • Opening Procedures-2 MINUTESReview1. Walk in quietly2. Enter the room BEFORE the bell rings – Do not stand outside the door3. Sit in your assigned seat4. Take out notebook and pen/pencil – You must bring your own pencil/pen and notebook – You will keep your notebook in the class – Write your name on the top of the notebook and on the inside cover5. Write down the notes for the day or begin the activity that is posted on the overheadRemember:1. We begin on time, and we do not waste time.2. Do not get up from your seat without permission.3. When the class ends, you must stay in your seat and wait till I dismiss you.
    • Speaking and Listening-2 Mins• Speaking and Listening are parts of your grade• What does “speaking” look like? – Reflect on the question (think time) – Write down a response before you speak (prepare) – Raise your hand (we want to give everyone a chance)• What does listening look like? – Why is it important to hear everyone’s thoughts and opinions? – What are your experiences with people who “hog” the conversation? – How do you feel when people interrupt you? Talk over you? – The body language of listening • Looking at the speaker • The white of your eyes should be facing the speaker • Do not write or play with items on your desk when someone is speaking
    • Read and Listen to Poetry Read along from your handout as we listen to the following poems• Johnny Depp reads Jack Kerouac• "The X Is Black" by Amiri Baraka• "A Three Point Shot from Andromeda" by Paul Beatty (11:17 PM)• Project Princess by Tracie Morrison
    • In your notebookDate: Thursday, January 26thPoem: Mexico City BluesDirections:1. Look at the list of literary terms2. Look at the poem Mexico City Blues3. Identify a term that’s Line from poem Term being used Imagery Got buried/ In a coffin in the grave (line 3- 4) Metaphor
    • Term Line Then died and got buriedImagery in a coffin in the grave went out & got laid it is perfect with emptiness it is perfectMetaphor with emptiness your goal is your starting place No race was run, no walk of prophetic toenails depressed, angry, hopeless, numblyTone- the speaker is Sad, wise, and conscious, feeling Upset with ignorance Because it is empty,Repetition Because it is perfect with emptiness, Because its not even happening Man Empty, emptiness, perfect, it is Teaching, Anger, Diamond
    • Term Line from poem Imagery If a flag catch/fire (lines 1 & 2) Metaphor that X is blackMessage:Tone:Images
    • Term Line from the poem Mexico City Blues Imagery Got up and dressed up in a coffin in the grave went out & got laid died and got buried Repetition Because it is empty, Because it is perfect empty Emptiness own emptiness Personification Anger Doesnt like to be reminded of fits Everything Is Ignorant of its own emptiness Tone Sad, mad, numb, depressed, lonely, Metaphor your goal is your starting place,Date: Thursday, January 26thPoem: Mexico City Blues
    • Respond to Poetry• On a separate piece of paper, – write your name, – period, and – date at the top• Be prepared to turn in your paper• As we listen/view each poem again, – note the poem on your paper and – answer the questions on your handout• Be prepared to discuss your responses before you turn in your paper
    • English 9Friday, January 24 th Mr. Huth Poetry Day 3
    • 1. Sit down2. Take out your notebook3. Take down the following notes in your notebook (you have three minutes):Lesson Objective•I am learning--What a line is in poetry--What a stanza is in poetry--What an end rhyme is--What a rhyme scheme is--What an image and imagery are•I am doing--Reading and listening--Writing--DiscussingI know I learned because--I can…--I can…I have questions about…
    • Review of Poetry Introduction• What were some of the literary terms used in Mexico City Blues?• What is the meaning of The X Is Black?• How is imagery used in Three Point Shot From Andromeda?• How did the writer feel about the subject of Project Princess?• What vocabulary words did you learn?
    • The Road Not Taken By Robert Frost• Read along on your handout as we view and listen to the following versions of the poem• The Road Not Taken (Open to page 189 in your green text book) (read by Robert Frost)• The Road Not Taken (with images)
    • Literary Terms--Always Take Notes!• Line: A basic structural component of a poem. Lines can be written in free form, in syllabic form (e.g. haiku) or in metrical form. A single line may or may not end in punctuation.• Stanza: One or more lines that make up the basic units of a poem - separated from each other by spacing. Often used to organize a poem by ideas, setting, speaker, time, or other factors.• End Rhyme: The effect produced when similar vowel sounds chime together and where the final consonant sound is also in agreement e.g. bat and cat. An end rhyme occurs at the end of lines in poetry.• Rhyme Scheme: The pattern of rhymes in a poem. The rhyme scheme in a poem can be analyzed by using letters at the end of lines to denote similar vowel sounds: There once was a big brown cat a That liked to eat a lot of mice. b He got all round and fat a Because they tasted so nice. b• Image, Imagery: Images are representations of sensations perceived through the five senses: sight, hearing, smell, touch and taste. Visual images are the most common. Imagery includes the "mental pictures" that readers experience in a passage of literature. It signifies all the sensory perceptions referred to in a poem.
    • Respond to Poetry• Answer the questions on your handout using a separate piece of paper• Write your – name, – period, and – date at the top of the paper• Be prepared to discuss your answers• Be prepared to hand in your paper