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Quoting paraphrasing and summarizing
Quoting paraphrasing and summarizing
Quoting paraphrasing and summarizing
Quoting paraphrasing and summarizing
Quoting paraphrasing and summarizing
Quoting paraphrasing and summarizing
Quoting paraphrasing and summarizing
Quoting paraphrasing and summarizing
Quoting paraphrasing and summarizing
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Quoting paraphrasing and summarizing

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  • 1. Quoting, Paraphrasing, and Summarizing WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN THE THREE WAYS OF INCORPORATING OTHER WRITERS WORK INTO YOUR OWN WRITING?
  • 2. What is plagiarism?Is copying just a sentence or two without crediting asource plagiarism?Is it OK to paraphrase what another has writtenwithout correctly citing the author?Is it OK to use information or ideas without creditingthe source if the exact words are not used?Can you use parts of a friends paper as your own ifhe or she says its OK?
  • 3. Why do we use quotes, paraphrases, and summaries?• To provide support for claims or add credibility to your writing• To refer to work that leads up to the work you are now doing• To give examples of several points of view on a subject• To highlight a particularly striking phrase, sentence, or passage by quoting the original• To expand the breadth or depth of your writing
  • 4. QUOTING• Quotations must… – Be identical to the original – Use a narrow segment of the source – Match the source document word for word – Be attributed to the original author
  • 5. PARAPHRASING• Involves putting a passage from source material into your own words• Paraphrased material must also be attributed to the source• A paraphrase is usually shorter than the original passage
  • 6. SUMMARIZING• Involves putting the main idea(s) into your own words, including only the main points• Summaries must also be attributed to the source• Summaries are significantly shorter than the original and give a broad overview of the source material
  • 7. Six Steps to Effective Paraphrasing1. Reread the original passage until you understand its full meaning. You can’t paraphrase what you don’t understand.2. Set the original aside, and write your paraphrase on a note card.3. Jot down a few words below your paraphrase to remind you later how you envision using this material. At the top of the note card, write a key word or phrase to indicate the subject of your paraphrase.
  • 8. Six Steps to Effective Paraphrasing4. Check your version with the original to make sure that your version accurately expresses all the essential information in a new form.5. Use quotation marks to identify any unique term or phraseology you have borrowed exactly from the source.6. Record the source (including the page) on your note card so that you can credit it easily if you decide to incorporate the material into your paper.
  • 9. Original Passage: Students frequently overuse direct quotation in taking notes, and as a result they overuse quotations in the final [research] paper. Probably only about 10% of your final manuscript should appear as directly quoted matter. Therefore, you should strive to limit the amount of exact transcribing of source material while taking notes. Lester, James D. Writing Research Papers. 2nd ed. (1976): 4647. A Legitimate Paraphrase: An Acceptable Summary:In research papers students often Students should take just a few notes in quote excessively, failing to direct quotation from sources to help keep quoted material down to a desirable level. Since the minimize the amount of quoted material problem usually originates in a research paper (Lester 4647). during note taking, it is essential to minimize the material recorded verbatim (Lester 4647). A Plagiarized Version: Students often use too many direct quotations when they take notes, resulting in too many of them in the final research paper. In fact, probably only about 10% of the final copy should consist of directly quoted material. So it is important to limit the amount of source material copied while taking notes.

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