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Monday, September 24, 2007 Mrs. Navejar
Shakespeare Reader’s Log <ul><li>Open your notebook to a new page </li></ul><ul><li>Write the following in your notebook <...
Ex-  Hamlet Ex- Romeo & Juliet  Names of Characters and Plays I learned about Shakespeare Plays I know Shakespeare Charact...
English 10  <ul><li>We’re going to start our Shakespeare unit.  </li></ul><ul><li>Structure </li></ul><ul><li>Shakespeare ...
<ul><li>Handout on Shakespeare </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Complete crossword puzzle </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“Test Your Shake...
Henry IV, Part 1  <ul><li>History of the Royal family </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Can you name this guy? </li></ul></ul>
Henry IV, Part 1  <ul><li>History of the Royal family </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Can you name this guy? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul>...
Henry IV, Part 1  <ul><li>History of the Royal family </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Can you name this guy? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul>...
Royal Family History  <ul><li>Can you trace your family history back like William can?  </li></ul><ul><li>Visit the Englis...
Henry IV <ul><li>Henry IV </li></ul><ul><li>1399-1413 </li></ul><ul><li>Henry come from the following House </li></ul><ul>...
Shakespeare Reader’s Log Review <ul><li>Who was William Shakespeare? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>When was he born </li></ul></ul...
Hearing and using Shakespeare’s Words <ul><li>VERSE VS. PROSE </li></ul><ul><li>Shakespeare employs several forms of langu...
Blank Verse: Unrhymed Iambic Pentameter  <ul><li>BLANK VERSE: UNRHYMED IAMBIC PENTAMETER </li></ul><ul><li>Blank verse  is...
Rhymed Verse  <ul><li>Rhymed verse   </li></ul><ul><li>consists of lines which rhyme at the end, usually in either an ABAB...
Shakespeare’s Reader’s Log  <ul><li>People </li></ul>Messengers, Porter, Soldiers, Lords, Attendants, Beadles, etc.. Speak...
Shakespeare’s Reader’s Log <ul><li>Loyal to King Henry IV </li></ul>Earl of Warwick Another son of King Henry IV Thomas [D...
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Monday, September 24, 2007

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Transcript of "Monday, September 24, 2007"

  1. 1. Monday, September 24, 2007 Mrs. Navejar
  2. 2. Shakespeare Reader’s Log <ul><li>Open your notebook to a new page </li></ul><ul><li>Write the following in your notebook </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Shakespeare Background- 9/24/07 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Shakespeare Chart </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Three columns </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>6 rows </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Short essay: Respond to the following- “Why should we learn about William Shakespeare?” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Basic information on Shakespeare- </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Born </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Died </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Where he lived </li></ul></ul></ul>
  3. 3. Ex- Hamlet Ex- Romeo & Juliet Names of Characters and Plays I learned about Shakespeare Plays I know Shakespeare Characters I know
  4. 4. English 10 <ul><li>We’re going to start our Shakespeare unit. </li></ul><ul><li>Structure </li></ul><ul><li>Shakespeare background </li></ul><ul><ul><li>We will watch, “William Shakespeare: A Poet for all Time” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Video will last for 30 min </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Outline of video </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Filmed on location in Stratford-on-Avon, celebrated Shakespearean actor Alan Howard presents some of the Bard’s best known works. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>What to expect- Howard speaks with an English accent and it might be difficult to understand at first. You need to listen very carefully. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>In your Reader’s log , write down the names and characters he mentions in your chart . Do any of the names sound familiar? </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>In your log, write down when Shakespeare was born, when he died and where he lived. </li></ul></ul></ul>
  5. 5. <ul><li>Handout on Shakespeare </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Complete crossword puzzle </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“Test Your Shakespeare IQ” </li></ul></ul><ul><li>See “An Introduction to Shakespeare” video </li></ul>
  6. 6. Henry IV, Part 1 <ul><li>History of the Royal family </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Can you name this guy? </li></ul></ul>
  7. 7. Henry IV, Part 1 <ul><li>History of the Royal family </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Can you name this guy? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Prince William of England/2 nd in line </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>To the throne of England </li></ul></ul></ul>
  8. 8. Henry IV, Part 1 <ul><li>History of the Royal family </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Can you name this guy? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Prince William of England/2 nd in line </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>To the throne of England </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Dad’s name- Prince Charles/next in </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>line to the throne of England </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Brother’s name is Prince Henry/3 rd in </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Line to the throne of England </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>
  9. 9. Royal Family History <ul><li>Can you trace your family history back like William can? </li></ul><ul><li>Visit the English Monarch site www.englishmonarchs.co.uk </li></ul><ul><li>Shakespeare Reader’s Log notes </li></ul><ul><li>Who was Henry IV </li></ul><ul><li>What are his “dates” </li></ul><ul><li>Which line is he from? </li></ul><ul><li>What was The Battle of Shrewsbury ? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Who was fighting who? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Where did they fight? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Why did they fight </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Write down the main people’s names. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Remember the fact that this really happened. It’s an </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>important part of English History. </li></ul></ul>
  10. 10. Henry IV <ul><li>Henry IV </li></ul><ul><li>1399-1413 </li></ul><ul><li>Henry come from the following House </li></ul><ul><li>The House of Lancaster </li></ul><ul><li>The House of Lancaster was established on England's throne when Henry of Bolingbroke usurped the crown from his cousin Richard II in 1399, marking the beginning the dynastic dispute later known as the Wars of the Roses. One of the badges of the house was the red rose. </li></ul><ul><li>The dynasty ruled for three generations before the throne was taken from Henry's grandson, Henry VI, by the powerful rival House of York in 1461, it became extinct in the male line on the death of Henry VI's son, Edward of Lancaster at the Battle of Tewksbury in 1471. </li></ul>
  11. 11. Shakespeare Reader’s Log Review <ul><li>Who was William Shakespeare? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>When was he born </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>When did he die </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Where did he live </li></ul></ul><ul><li>What are some plays and characters we already know? </li></ul><ul><li>Who was Henry IV </li></ul><ul><li>What are his “dates” </li></ul><ul><li>Which line is he from? </li></ul><ul><li>What was The Battle of Shrewsbury ? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Who was fighting who? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Where did they fight? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Why did they fight </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Write down the main people’s names. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Remember the fact that this really happened . It’s an </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>important part of English History. </li></ul></ul>
  12. 12. Hearing and using Shakespeare’s Words <ul><li>VERSE VS. PROSE </li></ul><ul><li>Shakespeare employs several forms of language in his plays: prose, blank verse, and rhymed verse. Prose is what we think of as everyday speech, without specific rules of rhyme and rhythm. Verse , then, can be defined as giving order, or form, to the random stress pattern of prose. This repeating combination of stressed and unstressed syllables is known as a foot , which is the basic unit of verse. An iamb , or iambic foot , is a foot of poetry containing two syllables, with an unstressed syllable followed by a stressed syllable: “ ta DUM .” </li></ul>
  13. 13. Blank Verse: Unrhymed Iambic Pentameter <ul><li>BLANK VERSE: UNRHYMED IAMBIC PENTAMETER </li></ul><ul><li>Blank verse is the standard poetic form Shakespeare uses in his plays. It can also be defined as unrhymed iambic pentameter . That is, a line of poetry containing five (&quot;penta&quot; meaning five) iambic feet, not rhyming with any adjacent line. That's ten syllables altogether. The pattern flows easily for speakers of English, and the stresses match the human heart beat - &quot;ta DUM, ta DUM, ta DUM, ta DUM, ta DUM.” If you say &quot;I went downtown to buy a card today&quot; with normal inflection, you will have spoken a line of iambic pentameter: </li></ul><ul><li>i WENT | down TOWN | to BUY | a CARD | to DAY </li></ul><ul><li>Now say a line from 2 Henry IV —the rebel Lord Bardolph’s exclamation to Northumberland about Hotspur’s death (1.1.104): </li></ul><ul><li>I cannot think, my lord, your son is dead. </li></ul><ul><li>or </li></ul><ul><li>i CAN- | not THINK, | my LORD, | your SON | is DEAD. </li></ul>
  14. 14. Rhymed Verse <ul><li>Rhymed verse </li></ul><ul><li>consists of lines which rhyme at the end, usually in either an ABAB rhyme scheme or in couplets or pairs. Shakespeare sometimes uses rhymed verse to signal a character's heightened emotional state, and couplets are common at the conclusion of an act or scene. Many rhymed couplets grouped together give a lighter tone to a speech. Sometimes they also convey a high sense of formality. Note 4.2.118-123, in which Prince John of Lancaster, Hal’s younger brother, pronounces judgment upon rebels whom he has rounded up: </li></ul><ul><li>Lancaster Most shallowly did you these arms commence, </li></ul><ul><li>Fondly brought here, and foolishly sent hence. </li></ul><ul><li>Strike up our drums, pursue the scatter’d stray: </li></ul><ul><li>God, and not we, have safely fought today. </li></ul><ul><li>Some guard these traitors to the block of death, </li></ul><ul><li>Treason’s true bed and yielder-up of breath. </li></ul>
  15. 15. Shakespeare’s Reader’s Log <ul><li>People </li></ul>Messengers, Porter, Soldiers, Lords, Attendants, Beadles, etc.. Speaker of the Epilogue The “Presenter” of the play Rumor What they do Character’s name
  16. 16. Shakespeare’s Reader’s Log <ul><li>Loyal to King Henry IV </li></ul>Earl of Warwick Another son of King Henry IV Thomas [Duke] of Clarence Another son of Henry IV Humphrey [Duke] of Gloucester Another son of King Henry IV Prince John of Lancaster King Henry’s son and heir; afterwards Henry V Henry, Prince of Wales (called Hal) King of England King Henry IV
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