Friday feb 10

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Friday feb 10

  1. 1. Friday, February 10www.slideshare.net/reginanavejar English 9- Second Semester Navejar, Dammanna, Huth
  2. 2. Review1. How do you start a new paragraph?2. Do you put spaces in between paragraphs? Yes or No3. What are the three parts of an essay?4. What are the three parts of a paragraph?
  3. 3. Write down the following notes Denotation and Connotation• DENOTATION: The common, strict definition of a word as found in a dictionary; usually easily understood• CONNOTATION: The extra layer of meaning each word carries beyond the minimal, strict definition found in a dictionary• Much of poetry involves the poet using connotative diction that suggests meanings beyond what the words simply say• Example: The word "snake" simply denotes a reptile. But it has the connotation of someone who can not be trusted, someone sneaky, or dishonest
  4. 4. Denotation Connotation Snake Snake (shifty guy) Hollywood Hollywood (glamorous life)
  5. 5. What we accomplished• Period two- We took a quiz on essay/paragraph structure. We took notes to prepare for Blackberry Eating poem. We prepared our notebooks for notebook check.• Period three- We took a quiz on essay/paragraph structure. We took notes to prepare for Blackberry Eating poem. We prepared our notebooks for notebook check.• Period 4/5- We took a quiz on essay/paragraph structure. We took notes to prepare for Blackberry Eating poem. We prepared our notebooks for notebook check.• Period 7/8- We took a quiz on essay/paragraph structure. We took notes to prepare for Blackberry Eating poem. We prepared our notebooks for notebook check.• Period 9- We took a quiz on essay/paragraph structure. We took notes to prepare for Blackberry Eating poem. We prepared our notebooks for notebook check.
  6. 6. Notebook check Today*You have 5 min to fix your notebook• We will check your notebook on Friday• If you do not have a notebook, you must have one by Friday – Daily notes – Essay notes- five paragraphs – Poetry terms – Frost CABS (we have this) – Blackberry Eating Notes – Verb Problem Handout• We will enter in your 5 paragraph poetry analysis – Complete/incomplete grade• Participation grade
  7. 7. Lesson objective• Today we will:1. Review poetry terms we learned2. Discuss denotation/connotation3. Learn a new reading strategy4. Read Blackberry Eating a. Review terms we learned b. Work on analytical questions5. Literary term test
  8. 8. Blackberry EatingConnectThink of an everyday event that made you reflect/think. Example- sitting on the porch.Background: The blackberry is an aggregate fruit that is composed of many smaller fruits called drupes.Literary AnalysisImagery: the descriptive language that paints pictures in readers’ minds. Appeals to the five senses: sight, sound, taste, smell or touchReading strategyForm a mental picture of each image: imagine experiencing what the speaker experiences at that moment, or relate the image in the poem to something that you yourself have experienced.Vocabulary DevelopmentWrite down the vocabulary words you see on page 913 and the definitions.
  9. 9. Blackberry Eating• Turn to page 914---- Whole Group• Read poem 3 times• Identify literary devices that are being used in the poem – Terms we already know (look at list) – Terms we just learned• Answer questions on page 914---Individual work/notebook check – 1 – 2 (a, b, and c) – 3 – 4
  10. 10. Terms and DefinitionsFree Verse: Verse without formal meter or rhyme patterns. Free verse reliesupon the natural rhythms of everyday speech. Modern and contemporarypoets of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries often employ free verse.Figurative Language: A form of language use in which writers and speakersconvey something other than the literal meaning of their words in order toshow an imaginative relationship between different things. Simile, metaphor,and personification are examples of figurative language.Simile: A figure of speech involving a comparison between unlike things usingthe words like or as. An example is "My love is like a red, red rose.“Metaphor: A comparison between essentially unlike things withoutcomparative words such as like or as. An example is "My love is a red, redrose."Personification: A type of figurative language in which inanimate objects orabstract ideas are given human characteristics. Personification is a form ofmetaphor.Imagery: The creation of images using words. Poets usually achieve this byinvoking comparisons by means of metaphor or simile or other figures of
  11. 11. Terms and Definitions 2• Alliteration The repetition of consonant sounds, especially at the beginning of words. Brenda’s got a baby, but Brenda’s barely got a brain.• Rhythm The recurrence of accent or stress in lines of verse. In the following lines from "Same in Blues" by Langston Hughes, the accented words and syllables are underlined: I said to my baby, (6) Baby take it slow.... (5) Lulu said to Leonard (6) I want a diamond ring (6)• Diction The selection of words in a literary work. A works diction forms one of its centrally important literary elements, as writers use words to convey action, reveal character, imply attitudes, identify themes, and suggest values.
  12. 12. Squinched Tense up the muscles of (ones eyes or face): "Gina squinched her face Blackberry Eating up". By- Galway Kinnell I love to go out in late Septemberamong the fat, overripe, icy, black blackberriesto eat blackberries for breakfast,the stalks very prickly, a penalty strengththey earn for knowing the black artof blackberry-making; and as I stand among them Whatlifting the stalks to my mouth, the ripest berries literaryfall almost unbidden to my tongue, devicesas words sometimes do, certain peculiar words arelike strengths or squinched, being used?many-lettered, one-syllabled lumps,which I squeeze, squinch open, and splurge wellin the silent, startled, icy, black languageof blackberry -- eating in late September.
  13. 13. TWO roads diverged in a yellow wood,And sorry I could not travel bothAnd be one traveler, long I stoodAnd looked down one as far as I could Nothing Gold Can StayTo where it bent in the undergrowth;Then took the other, as just as fair, Natures first green is gold,And having perhaps the better claim, Her hardest hue to hold.Because it was grassy and wanted wear; Her early leafs a flower;Though as for that the passing thereHad worn them really about the same, But only so an hour. Then leaf subsides to leaf.And both that morning equally lay So Eden sank to grief,In leaves no step had trodden black.Oh, I kept the first for another day! So dawn goes down to day.Yet knowing how way leads on to way, Nothing gold can stay.I doubted if I should ever come back.I shall be telling this with a sighSomewhere ages and ages hence:Two roads diverged in a wood, and I—I took the one less traveled by,And that has made all the difference.

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