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New Media and Education
 

New Media and Education

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Prepared for the 2010 Popular Culture Association national conference in St. Louis, MO. April 1-3, 2010.

Prepared for the 2010 Popular Culture Association national conference in St. Louis, MO. April 1-3, 2010.

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  • My name is John Martin, I&#x2019;m a recent PhD in Education from UW-Madison, part of the Games, Learning, and Society research group there. And I also work there as a Learning Consultant, looking at some of the trends and trying to push them to try to keep up. <br /> <br /> Keeping up is even more impossible for Educators than it is for everyone else, except Intellectual Property Lawyers... <br />
  • <br />
  • Today I guess I&#x2019;m speaking on Education and Learning, and how that&#x2019;s sorta changing -- maybe... <br />
  • The truth is that we&#x2019;ve been having an argument in education for a long time. <br />
  • And we keep coming back to the same themes <br />
  • but we seem to keep ignoring them, because we really want something NEW and SHINY <br />
  • Thanks to Star Trek, we know what education will look like (on Vulcan, anyway) in the 23rd Century &#x2014; a lot of direct instruction... <br />
  • with plenty of time for the tradition of bullies throwing down "yo&#x2019; mama&#x2019;s so human!" insults between intensive, personalized sessions. <br />
  • But how do we (or did we) get there? <br />
  • Well, although school as an institution isn&#x2019;t socially relevant &#x2014; in many students&#x2019; views. <br /> <br /> (Dance class) <br />
  • Change is hard for an institution whose hierarchical, top-down nature is part of its core structure. <br />
  • But the norms of school may have met its match. <br />
  • How do schools react? <br />
  • And it may be fighting a losing battle <br />
  • as well as banning some really powerful learning tools. <br />
  • So, in education, some of us are taking a look at what&#x2019;s happening <br />
  • Who it&#x2019;s affecting, <br /> <br /> (2010 Pew Report on Social Media and Young Adults) <br />
  • How deeply they are affected, <br /> <br /> (Kaiser) They&#x2019;re &#x201C;exposed&#x201D; to media, [but not just consuming]; and they&#x2019;re exposing themselves to more than one type at a time (hence 10:45 worth) <br />
  • And why... <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br />
  • It turns out, that they&#x2019;re doing a lot of the same things they&#x2019;ve always done, <br />
  • Communicating, Sharing, Investigating, Buying and Selling, Friending, Socializing, Entertaining, etc. <br />
  • Just at a Way-Bigger Scale <br />
  • Mind-numbingly bigger scale. <br />
  • And all these things are having a huge impact on their expectations in life and in their educational endeavors <br />
  • You may have seen Mike Wesch&#x2019;s work... <br />
  • Wesch brought his class into their own instruction by having them look at their lives &#x2014; their own practices, and the practices of their peers &#x2014; <br /> <br /> and he used that as a launching point and foundation for an much larger problem-based investigation. <br />
  • This runs counter to the model of Industrial Age model of Traditional Education. <br />
  • And it&#x2019;s messier, and harder for schools to deal with. Keep in mind that much of educational practice is based on the administration of the student &#x2014; keeping track of them, keeping them in line, etc. <br /> <br /> Teaching is chaos, as is. <br />
  • But technology offers educators a chance to try new things that, hopefully will keep kids engaged &#x2014; an engaged student is on-task (and we like that) <br />
  • In 2005, I worked with a few 5th graders to create a game based on a local neighborhood. <br /> <br /> This was a one-player, one-role tour based on an urban renewal scenario created by Micah. <br />
  • My dissertation research centered on another AR game written by 11-13 year olds that structured a 4-day hiking trip with a game narrative. <br />
  • It was fun, and it added a lot to the trips. You can ask me about it later if you want. <br />
  • It was fun, and it added a lot to the trips. You can ask me about it later if you want. <br />
  • It was fun, and it added a lot to the trips. You can ask me about it later if you want. <br />
  • We&#x2019;ve also let students go out and research their communities with mobile devices (cameras, iphones, GPS units, etc.). <br /> This was super-powerful, super-situated place-based learning. <br />
  • At UW-Madison, we&#x2019;re encouraging faculty to try these things, <br />
  • Others have been at it longer <br />
  • But there are problems, of course <br />
  • The world may collapse if we don&#x2019;t do it right. <br />
  • So, if you have any ideas to save us, let me know. <br />
  • <br />

New Media and Education New Media and Education Presentation Transcript

  • New Media and Traditional Education John Martin UW-Madison Academic Technology regardingjohn@gmail.com
  • theme
  • Education and Learning being archived the World knowledge tools society
  • the true centre of correlation of the school subjects is not science, nor literature, nor history, nor geography, but the child's own social activities. “My Pedagogic Creed” by John Dewey. School Journal vol. 54 (January 1897), pp. 77-80.
  • problem
  • if we put before the mind's eye the ordinary schoolroom ... we can reconstruct the only educational activity that can possibly go on in such a place. It is all made 'for listening'" (Dewey, 1900).
  • In the early 1900s, as part of the social efficiency movement, educational leaders began applying aspects of Frederick Taylorʼs conception of scientific management of factory production to the structures of schooling (Kliebard 2004). For Taylor, efficient production relied upon the factory managersʼ ability to gather all the information possible about the work which they oversaw, systematically analyze it according to ʻscientificʼ methods, figure out the most efficient ways for workers to complete individual tasks and then tell the worker exactly how to produce their products in an ordered manner (Noble 1977). Scientific management thus represented a form of ʻtechnical controlʼ (Apple 1995) over labour, where the logics of control are embedded in the very structure of the process of production itself. Au, Wayne (2008) 'Between education and the economy: high-stakes testing and the contradictory location of the new middle class', Journal of Education Policy, 23:5, 501—513.
  • http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/northamerica/usa/7418141/Laptops-banned-from-lectures-in-US-universities-as-professors-rebel.html
  • reality
  • From the 2010 Pew report: • 73% of wired American teens now use social networking websites
  • Who’s in school? From the 2010 Pew report: • 73% of wired American teens now use social networking websites
  • Reiss’s16 Basic Desires social contact physical exercise independence curiosity acceptance honor romance order power saving vengeance idealism status tranquility family eating Reiss, S. (2000). Who am I: The 16 basic desires that motivate our actions and define our personalities. New York: Tarcher/Putnam.
  • “Yes, today you can chat with friends, collaborate on projects, read the news, play games, or share videos of your kids, all online. But you could do all that stuff offline before 1991. It’s just much easier and faster now. What’s different—what’s fundamentally different—is the size of your social space, and of course the size of everyone else’s. The Internet has made these spaces much, much bigger.” - Joshua Fisher http://www.sramanamitra.com/2010/01/30/what-is-good-teaching/
  • http://mashable.com/2009/07/28/social-networking-users-us/
  • ■ Average user spends 55 minutes per day ■ 35 million update status every day ■ 3 billion photos uploaded each month ■ 5 billion pieces of content shared every day ■ 70% of users are outside the United States http://www.pamorama.net/2010/03/29/amazing-facebook-facts-infographic/
  • YouTube: 24 hours uploaded per minute! http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_nitktFIV4LU/S6EVwzwji1I/AAAAAAAAABk/MN2MpJood8M/s1600-h/hours.uplaoded.per.minute.png
  • Implications
  • instead of starting from the Cartesian premise of “I think, therefore I am,” and from the assumption that knowledge is something that is transferred to the student via various pedagogical strategies, the social view of learning says, “We participate, therefore we are.” John Seely Brown and Richard P. Adler (2008)
  • Learning being tools archived the World knowledge society
  • Ideas
  • Start 1 17 16 15 Micah's Greenbush Game 2 1 (2005) 8-9 6-7 5 2-4 10 17 16 3 15 Samuel 11 14 4 14 12 13 5 13 3/27; 6-7 8-9 10 11 12
  • 1 Under 2 Avoid 3 Early 4 Camp Start attack! trails info here! 5 Get The signal 1 Mystery Trip (2005-09) 6 Get signal 2 7 Camp here 8 Get signal 3 9 Silence scouts 13 Thanks 12 Broad- 11 Camp 10 Avoid Heroes! cast here snipers
  • You left camp about an hour ago. The hike is going well. You feel a buzzing in your backpack. You take out your Communicator, and read the message. Photo by 2008 Mystery Trip Group
  • You left camp about an hour ago. The hike is going well. You feel a buzzing in your backpack. You take out your Communicator, and read the message. It’s John. His face is scratched and bloody, battered and bruised. After you left, camp was overrun by men in green. We tried to fend them off. There were five of them on Noah at one time, and Addie took out eight or so, but the sheer numbers overcame us. Photo by 2008 Mystery Trip Group
  • You left camp about an hour ago. The hike is going well. You feel a buzzing in your backpack. You take out your Communicator, and read the message. It’s John. His face is It’s John. His face is scratched and bloody, scratched and bloody, battered and bruised. battered and bruised. After you left, camp was I’m not sure why they attacked. overrun by men in green. Head up Great Pond Mountain. I’ll try to communicate with you We tried to fend them off. there. Stay out of sight, and off There were five of them on the open faces — and don’t Noah at one time, and Addie take the main trails; I think took out eight or so, but the they’re monitoring them. sheer numbers overcame us. Go! and be careful! Photo by 2008 Mystery Trip Group
  • You left camp about an hour ago. The hike is going well. You feel a buzzing in your backpack. You take out your Communicator, and read the message. It’s John. His face is It’s John. His face is John Martin, looking scratched and bloody, scratched and bloody, really really tired. battered and bruised. battered and bruised. After you left, camp was I’m not sure why they attacked. They’re setting up some kind of overrun by men in green. Head up Great Pond Mountain. base station here. There’s all I’ll try to communicate with you sorts of radio gear. We tried to fend them off. there. Stay out of sight, and off If you can get to one of the There were five of them on the open faces — and don’t nearby peaks, you might be Noah at one time, and Addie take the main trails; I think able to intercept a transmission took out eight or so, but the they’re monitoring them. with your Communicator. sheer numbers overcame us. Go! and be careful! Photo by 2008 Mystery Trip Group
  • Greenbush History State Street Student- Designed Seven AR AR Projects Design Projects Greenbush Story Game Unit Mystery Trip Tree Tour Nature Hill
  • Issues
  • Clay Shirkyʼs predication: This shock of inclusion, where professional media gives way to participation by two billion amateurs (a threshold we will cross this year) means that average quality of public thought has collapsed; when anyone can say anything any time, how could it not? If all that happens from this influx of amateurs is the destruction of existing models for producing high-quality material, we would be at the beginning of another Dark Ages. http://www.edge.org/q2010/q10_1.html
  • thanks. John Martin gameslearningsociety.org University of Wisconsin - Madison Academic Technology regardingjohn.com