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Searching for the Evidence:
    PubMed (Medline)
        Susan Fowler, MLIS
         Medical Librarian
        Fowler@wust...
PubMed (Medline)
   • Free resource developed and maintained by the 
     National Center for Biotechnology Information (N...
Access
  Be sure to access PubMed from becker.wustl.edu to take advantage of
  library links to full text.
Create a My NCBI Account
Create a My NCBI Account, cont…
MeSH = Medical Subject Headings

                         Choose MeSH
                              from 
                ...
MeSH in PubMed

Enter your search terms one at a time…
MeSH cont…



             Choose the most 
                applicable 
               MeSH terms
MeSH cont…
 You have not searched the literature yet. Searching MeSH is akin to
 searching a thesaurus for the best term.
...
MeSH cont…
 Once you click “Search PubMed” you will have searched that term in all the
 citations in the Medline database....
Advanced Search 
Once you have searched each term separately, go to advanced search to
combine them.
Advanced Search, cont… 


                     Enter search 
                     numbers and 
                    combine...
Limits
Limits cont…
For the most clinically applicable articles, limit to “Humans,” “English,” and 
“Type of Article”
Type of Article Suggestions

Tier 1                      Tier 2
                            •   Clinical Trial
 • Meta‐Ana...
Accessing Full‐Text Articles




  Avoid clicking on publisher icons unless they explicitly state that they are free or 
 ...
Accessing Full‐Text Articles, cont…




 It is likely that your institution’s library has facilitated link‐out in PubMed t...
Send To                                                        From “Send to” drop 
                                      ...
PubMed (MedLine)

 PubMed advantages                PubMed disadvantages
    – Free to search                 – Still have...
More PubMed Tutorials
PubMed has tutorials available from their site…
20 Minutes
      If 20 minutes have passed and you still have not found what you
      are looking for, stop and ask for h...
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Ebm pub med

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Transcript of "Ebm pub med"

  1. 1. Searching for the Evidence: PubMed (Medline) Susan Fowler, MLIS Medical Librarian Fowler@wustl.edu 314‐362‐8092 pg: 314‐360‐1069
  2. 2. PubMed (Medline) • Free resource developed and maintained by the  National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI),  at the U.S. National Library of Medicine (NLM), located  at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). • 20 million citations for biomedical literature from  MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books.  – 5,400 worldwide journals in 60 languages • Covers 1947 to the present with some older material.
  3. 3. Access Be sure to access PubMed from becker.wustl.edu to take advantage of library links to full text.
  4. 4. Create a My NCBI Account
  5. 5. Create a My NCBI Account, cont…
  6. 6. MeSH = Medical Subject Headings Choose MeSH from  Pull Down Menu
  7. 7. MeSH in PubMed Enter your search terms one at a time…
  8. 8. MeSH cont… Choose the most  applicable  MeSH terms
  9. 9. MeSH cont… You have not searched the literature yet. Searching MeSH is akin to searching a thesaurus for the best term. Send to Search Box
  10. 10. MeSH cont… Once you click “Search PubMed” you will have searched that term in all the citations in the Medline database. Click “Search PubMed”
  11. 11. Advanced Search  Once you have searched each term separately, go to advanced search to combine them.
  12. 12. Advanced Search, cont…  Enter search  numbers and  combine using  Boolean operators.
  13. 13. Limits
  14. 14. Limits cont… For the most clinically applicable articles, limit to “Humans,” “English,” and  “Type of Article”
  15. 15. Type of Article Suggestions Tier 1 Tier 2 • Clinical Trial • Meta‐Analysis • Clinical Trial, Phase I • Practice Guideline • Clinical Trial, Phase II • Clinical Trial, Phase III • Randomized Controlled  • Clinical Trial, Phase IV Trial • Comparative Study • Controlled Clinical Trial • Review • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural • Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural • Guideline • Research Support, Non‐U.S. Gov't • Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non‐P.H.S. • Multicenter Study • Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  16. 16. Accessing Full‐Text Articles Avoid clicking on publisher icons unless they explicitly state that they are free or  unless you are willing to pay $ 35.00 ‐65.00 dollars per article. 
  17. 17. Accessing Full‐Text Articles, cont… It is likely that your institution’s library has facilitated link‐out in PubMed to link you  directly to articles from journals to which they subscribe to. It is also likely that your institution’s library has an Inter‐Library Loan service that will  “borrow” the article you want from another library for you for a small charge (certainly  less then $35.00!) or for free.   Contact your librarian and find out what services are available and how to use them. 
  18. 18. Send To From “Send to” drop  down menu, choose  “E‐mail” You can email your results to yourself and your colleagues. 
  19. 19. PubMed (MedLine) PubMed advantages PubMed disadvantages – Free to search – Still have to appraise articles  – Searches same content as  once located Ovid MedLine – Adjacency searching is not  available
  20. 20. More PubMed Tutorials PubMed has tutorials available from their site…
  21. 21. 20 Minutes If 20 minutes have passed and you still have not found what you are looking for, stop and ask for help. • 660 S. Euclid • St. Louis Children’s Hospital 314‐362‐7085 Lauren Yaeger, 314‐454‐2768 Susan Fowler, 314‐362‐8092 yaegerl@wustl.edu Pg: 314‐360‐1069 fowler@wustl.edu • BJ North, Rothschild  Medical Library Reka Kozak, 314‐454‐7208 kozakr@wustl.edu
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