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Logistic: Airport Equipment And Facilities
Logistic: Airport Equipment And Facilities
Logistic: Airport Equipment And Facilities
Logistic: Airport Equipment And Facilities
Logistic: Airport Equipment And Facilities
Logistic: Airport Equipment And Facilities
Logistic: Airport Equipment And Facilities
Logistic: Airport Equipment And Facilities
Logistic: Airport Equipment And Facilities
Logistic: Airport Equipment And Facilities
Logistic: Airport Equipment And Facilities
Logistic: Airport Equipment And Facilities
Logistic: Airport Equipment And Facilities
Logistic: Airport Equipment And Facilities
Logistic: Airport Equipment And Facilities
Logistic: Airport Equipment And Facilities
Logistic: Airport Equipment And Facilities
Logistic: Airport Equipment And Facilities
Logistic: Airport Equipment And Facilities
Logistic: Airport Equipment And Facilities
Logistic: Airport Equipment And Facilities
Logistic: Airport Equipment And Facilities
Logistic: Airport Equipment And Facilities
Logistic: Airport Equipment And Facilities
Logistic: Airport Equipment And Facilities
Logistic: Airport Equipment And Facilities
Logistic: Airport Equipment And Facilities
Logistic: Airport Equipment And Facilities
Logistic: Airport Equipment And Facilities
Logistic: Airport Equipment And Facilities
Logistic: Airport Equipment And Facilities
Logistic: Airport Equipment And Facilities
Logistic: Airport Equipment And Facilities
Logistic: Airport Equipment And Facilities
Logistic: Airport Equipment And Facilities
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Logistic: Airport Equipment And Facilities

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The Ground Operations Standard for Airports. The tools, equipment and basic things they use in airport to operate their services. Some of this slide show the real situations at KLIA (Kuala Lumpur …

The Ground Operations Standard for Airports. The tools, equipment and basic things they use in airport to operate their services. Some of this slide show the real situations at KLIA (Kuala Lumpur International Airport)

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  • 1. LOGISTIC EQUIPMENTS AND FACILITIES FOR AIRPORT OPERATIONS
  • 2. 1. AIR TRAFFIC CONTROL TOWER The primary purpose of ATC worldwide is to prevent collisions, organize and expedite the flow of traffic, and provide information and other support for pilots
  • 3. 2. PAYPHONE BOOTHS IDD and STD calls can be made from telephones booths using : NO TYPE 1 Malaysian Coins 2 Time Reach payphone cards RM 20.00 (USD 5.30) RM 30.00 (USD 7.90) RM 50.00
  • 4. 3. AIRPORT CHECK-IN COUNTER  Passengers usually hand over any baggage that they do not wish or are not allowed to carry on to the aircraft's cabin  receive a boarding pass before they can proceed to board their aircraft
  • 5. 4. TROLLEYS  Complimentary luggage trolleys They are available within the baggage reclaim area and the Main Terminal Building (MTB).  Hand luggage trolleys They are available outside the arrival gates and are for elderly passengers and those with heavy hand luggage.  Car park trolleys They are available at the Covered Car Park, and can be found at specific nests on all floors. Passengers, however, are not allowed to take the trolleys into aerotrain
  • 6. 5. FLIGHT INFORMATION DISPLAY SYSTEM (FIDS)  Is a computer system used in airports to display flight information to passengers  Each line on an FIDS indicates a different flight number accompanied by: i. the airline name/logo and/or its IATA or ICAO airline designator ii. the city of origin or destination, and any intermediate points iii. the expected arrival or departure time or the updated time (reflecting and delays) iv. the gate number v. the check-in counter numbers or the name of the airline handling the check- in vi. the status of the flight, such as "Landed", "Delayed", and "Boarding".
  • 7. 6. AIRPORT LAGEND  Airport signs & wayfinding systems are guides to show visitors the way.
  • 8. 7. KLIA TV  While customers are waiting for their flight or waiting for the arrival of their loved ones, they can enjoy the entertaining programmes
  • 9. 8. AUTO TELLER MACHINES (ATM)  To withdraw the money or do other things such as prepaid top up, transaction and others.
  • 10. 9. NAVIGATION AIRLINES SCREEN TRACKER
  • 11. 10. INFORMATION BOARD
  • 12. 11. SELF CHECK IN  Airport check-in uses service counters found at commercial airports handling commercial air travel.  The check-in is normally handled by an airline itself or a handling agent working on behalf of an airline.  Passengers usually hand over any baggage that they do not wish or are not allowed to carry on to the aircraft's cabin and receive a boarding pass before they can proceed to board their aircraft.
  • 13. LUGGAGE SECURITY SCANNER
  • 14. AIRCRAFT PUSH BACK TRACTOR
  • 15. CATERING VEHICLE  Catering includes the unloading of unused food and drink from the aircraft, and the loading of fresh food and drinks for passengers and crew.  The meals are typically delivered in standardized carts.  Meals are prepared mostly on the ground in order to minimize the amount of preparation (apart from chilling or reheating) required in the air.
  • 16. CHOCKS  Chocks are used to prevent an aircraft from moving while parked at the gate or in a hangar.  Chocks are placed in the front ('fore') and back ('aft') of the wheels of landing gear. They are made out of hard wood or hard rubber.  Corporate safety guidelines in the USA almost always specify that chocks must be used in a pair on the same wheel and they must be placed in physical contact with the wheel.
  • 17. TANK TRUCK AIRCRAFT REFUELER  Aircraft refuelers can be either a self-contained fuel truck, or a hydrant truck or cart.  Fuel trucks are self- contained, typically containing up to 10,000 US gallons of fuel and have their own pumps, filters, hoses, and other equipment.  A hydrant cart or truck hooks into a central pipeline network and provides fuel to the aircraft.  There is a significant advantage with hydrant systems when compared to fuel trucks, as fuel trucks must be periodically replenished.
  • 18. AIRPORT SIGN SYSTEMS
  • 19. AIRPORT BEACONS/LIGHTING
  • 20. Some of the most common beacons are: Flashing white and green for civilian land airports. Flashing white and yellow for a water airport. Flashing white, yellow, and green for a heliport. Two quick white flashes followed by a green flash identifies a military airport.
  • 21. AIRPORT ROTATING BEACONS
  • 22. APPROACH LIGHT SYSTEMS  Approach light systems are primarily intended to provide a means to transition from instrument flight to visual flight for landing.  The system configuration depends on whether the runway is a precision or non-precision instrument runway.  Some systems include sequenced flashing lights, which appear to the pilot as a ball of light traveling toward the run- way at high speed.  Approach lights can also aid pilots operating under VFR at night.
  • 23. RUNWAY LIGHTING  Runway Edge lights  Single row of white lights on either side of runway edge  If Instrument Runway  Yellow for last 2,000 feet (or half, whichever is less)  Three types:  HIRLs (High Intensity Runway Lights )  MIRLs (Medium Intensity Runway Lights)  LIRLs (Low Intensity Runway Lights )  Three ways to ID (identify) runway at night:  Displaced threshold lighting – green lights on either side to indicate beginning of runway  Row of green lights  Row of red lights  REILs(Runway End Identifier Lights)  Consists of a pair of synchronized flashing lights located laterally on each side of the runway threshold.  Either omnidirectional or unidirectional facing the approach area.
  • 24. RUNWAY LIGHTING In – Runway Lighting  Centerline, touchdown zone, and taxiway turnoff lights  Centerline Lights  White until 3,000 ft  3,000 – 1,000 ft. alternating red and white  Last 1,000 ft. RED Taxiway Lighting  Blue lights that line both side of taxiway  Omni directional  Can be green
  • 25. AIRPORT LIGHTING
  • 26. Pallet & Container
  • 27. CARGO CONTAINER BOX CARGO PALLET
  • 28. TYPES OF LOADING AND UNLOADING CARGO From side
  • 29. UPPER DECK FREIGHT LOADER  Upper deck freight loader
  • 30. CONVEYOR BELT LOADER  Conveyor belt loaders are vehicles with movable belts for unloading and loading of baggage and cargo of aircraft.  A Conveyor belt loader is positioned to the door sill of an aircraft hold (baggage compartment) for the operation.  Conveyor belt loaders are used for narrow body aircraft (e.g. 737) and bulk hold of wide body aircraft (e.g. 767 and 747).
  • 31. WAREHOUSES EQUIPMENT
  • 32. PASSENGER BOARDING STAIR (PAX STEP)  Sometimes referred to as 'air-stairs', 'boarding ramps', 'stair car' or 'aircraft steps', provide a mobile means to traverse between aircraft doors and the ground.
  • 33. LAVATORY SERVICE VEHICLES  Lavatory service vehicles empty and refill lavatories on-board aircraft. Waste is stored in tanks on the aircraft until these vehicles can empty them and get rid of the waste.  After the tank is emptied, it is refilled with a mixture of water and a disinfecting concentrate, commonly called 'blue juice‘.  Instead of a self-powered vehicle, some airports have lavatory carts, which are smaller

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