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    Sentence types Sentence types Presentation Transcript

    • By : Sofea & Doreen Sentence Types : Simple & Compound Sentences
    • Rule 1 : • Simple sentences can be very short, consisting of only one word (a noun) for the subject and one word (a verb) for the predicate. • The noun is called the simple subject and the verb is the simple predicate. John laughed. Simple sentences are independent clauses. They contain a subject and a predicate.
    • Rule 2: • Simple sentences can be long, although they still consist of one subject (a noun and modifiers) and one predicate (a verb and other elements). The noun is called a simple subject, and the verb is the simple predicate. The tall, good-looking boy with the curly blond hair laughed uproariously at his best friend’s suggestion. Simple sentences are independent clauses. They contain a subject and a predicate.
    • 1. Three beautiful kittens looked up at me from inside a box of old clothes. 2. At the stroke of midnight, the carriage turned into a large orange pumpkin. 3. The three girls carried back packs filled with books, foods, make-ups and other assorted items. Exercise : identify the subject and predicate in these simple sentences. Subject : kittens Predicate : looked Subject : carriage Predicate : turned Subject : girls Predicate : carried
    • Rule 3 : • Simple sentences can be declarative or interrogative. You can shop at the mall on the weekend. (declarative) Can you shop at the mall on the weekend? (interrogative) Grading Simple sentences are independent clauses. They contain a subject and a predicate.
    • 1. Who can tell me the answer to the question about the Civil War? 2. Did Mary have time to call her brother this morning? 3. Where in the world did your sister put her purse and car keys? Exercise : identify the subject and predicate in these simple sentences. Subject : who Predicate : can tell Predicate : did haveSubject : Mary Predicate : did putSubject : sister
    • Rule 4 : Simple sentences can have a verb in any tense (past, present & future). My friend shops at the mall on the weekend. (present) My friend shopped at the mall last weekend. (past) My friend will shop at the mall next weekend. (future) Q&A Simple sentences are independent clauses. They contain a subject and a predicate.
    • 1. Three years ago, my baby sister was born on the first day of January. 2. Most of the times my classmates were wearing heavy clothes in the winter month. 3. The shiny yellow toy was easily caught by the eager puppy. Exercise : identify the subject and predicate (verb) in these simple sentences. Subject : sister Predicate : was born Predicate : were wearingSubject : classmates Predicate : was caughtSubject : toy
    • Rule 5 : Simple sentences can have a compound subject. Simon and Sally recorded an album that year. (compound subject) America’s well-known novelist, journalist and editors attended a conference in New York last week. (compound subject) Summary Simple sentences are independent clauses. They contain a subject and a predicate.
    • 1. You and I know the names of these flowers. 2. Frisky squirrels, jewel-like hummingbirds and little wild bunnies were hiding in the garden. 3. Every six weeks or so, her cousins and grade school classmates came over to her house for a little tea party Exercise : identify the compound subject and predicate in these simple sentences. Subject : you and I Predicate : know Predicate : were hiding Subject : frisky squirrels, jewel-like hummingbirds, little wild bunnies Predicate : cameSubject : cousins, grade school classmates
    • Rule 6 : Simple sentences can also have compound predicates. Lily sang, danced and played the violin with passion. Simple sentences are independent clauses. They contain a subject and a predicate.
    • 1. The telephone on the desk rang and rang then suddenly stop ringing. 2. Who’s coming to the party and bringing the ice-cream? 3. The man in the brown raincoat slipped quietly and around the corner and hid in a dark doorway. Exercise : identify the subject and predicate in these simple sentences. Subject : telephone Predicate : rang, rang and stop Predicate : coming, bringingSubject : who Predicate : slipped and hidSubject : man
    • Rule 7 : Simple sentences can also have both compound subject and compound predicate. The mashed avocado, minced garlic, vinegar, mayonnaise and olive oil should be blended thoroughly and whipped briefly for a light consistency. Simple sentences are independent clauses. They contain a subject and a predicate.
    • End of first part of slide We will proceed to the next slide.. 