Cummings Presentation to Mississippi School for Mathematics and Science
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Cummings Presentation to Mississippi School for Mathematics and Science

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Presentation on two ideas for including more electronic writing in the high school classroom.

Presentation on two ideas for including more electronic writing in the high school classroom.

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Cummings Presentation to Mississippi School for Mathematics and Science Cummings Presentation to Mississippi School for Mathematics and Science Presentation Transcript

  • Easy Strategies for Electronic Writing Robert Cummings Center for Writing and Rhetoric University of Mississippi 2013
  • Two Strategies for Electronic Writing in the Classroom Google Sites for Eportfolios Writing with Wikipedia
  • Google Sites for ePortfolios • How we use Google Sites at CWR • “Showcase” portfolio WRIT 100 and WRIT 101: “Choose one outcome from the course syllabus, and one course artifact which helped you learn that outcome, and discuss the relationship between the two.”
  • Google Sites for ePortfolios Writing Process: Students will demonstrate writing as a process that requires brainstorming, drafting, revising, editing, and proofreading. Exploration and Argument: Students will use writing to respond to readings, explore unfamiliar ideas, question thinking different from their own, reflect on personal experiences, and develop sound arguments. Purposes and Audience: Students will produce writing suitable for a variety of purposes, with an emphasis on academic purposes. Research: Students will integrate primary sources with their own ideas through summary, paraphrase, and quotation, and document those sources properly. Conventions and Mechanics: Students will produce writing that is free of serious grammatical and mechanical errors.
  • Google Sites for ePortfolios Example of WRIT 100 ePortfolio Reflective Introduction https://sites.google.com/a/go.olemiss.edu/ad davis/writing-101/reflective-introduction
  • Google Sites for ePortfolios • How we use Google Sites at CWR • “Showcase” portfolio WRIT 102 and LIBA 102: “Identify your most significant learning experience, select any course artifact(s) which helped you achieve that learning experience, and discuss the significance for a public audience.”
  • Google Sites for ePortfolios WRIT 102 ePortfolio Reflective Introduction Prompt https://sites.google.com/a/go.olemiss.edu/ad davis/writing-102/reflective- introduction/writ-102-reflective- introduction-prompt
  • Benefits: Google Sites for ePortfolios ePortfolios are a process, not a particular technology or platform. For example, during the fall 2010 pilots, too often we tended to focus on the strengths and weaknesses of the Chalk & Wire platform and associate those observations with “ePortfolio” generally. Though Chalk & Wire will not be our permanent ePortfolio tool, by wrestling with it and the issues it presents (e.g., student access to the Internet in the classroom, the method of classroom assignments for the CWR, the challenges of single sign on, Blackboard integration, classroom population, use of an appropriate rubrics, accommodation of multimodal assignments), we have grown as a program. These are not issues that the Freshman Writing Program was engaging in 2009. By engaging these issues, we are making lasting changes toward a new paradigm for teaching writing which will improve our students’ writing abilities and expand their literacy.
  • Benefits: Google Sites for ePortfolios Teaching with ePortfolios signals a program commitment to teaching reflection as an enduring academic value. Reflection, or the ability to independently assess one’s status in relationship to a learning experience, is bound up with the act of writing. Furthermore, the ability to self-reflect is an increasingly essential skill as the process of higher education becomes more and more heterogeneous and fragmented, with more interdisciplnarity, multiple institutions, and multiple teaching and learning settings. Teaching reflection as a program value will not be easy, as most of our students have not experienced it as an education goal. We will have to grow in terms of recognizing what constitutes authentic and valuable assessment; ePortfolios implicitly challenge us to examine some of our more negative assumptions about whether or not students learn at all in our classrooms.
  • Benefits: Google Sites for ePortfolios Teaching with ePortfolios signals a program commitment to teaching reflection as an enduring academic value. Reflection, or the ability to independently assess one’s status in relationship to a learning experience, is bound up with the act of writing. Furthermore, the ability to self-reflect is an increasingly essential skill as the process of higher education becomes more and more heterogeneous and fragmented, with more interdisciplnarity, multiple institutions, and multiple teaching and learning settings. Teaching reflection as a program value will not be easy, as most of our students have not experienced it as an education goal. We will have to grow in terms of recognizing what constitutes authentic and valuable assessment; ePortfolios implicitly challenge us to examine some of our more negative assumptions about whether or not students learn at all in our classrooms.
  • Benefits: Google Sites for ePortfolios ePortfolios signal a power shift toward student-centered learning. Though “student-centered learning” has become a cliché such over-generalizations draw their power from an understanding that our students need to be more involved in deciding what is studied, how it is studied, and what learning is significant in relationship to class goals. This does not mean that we are surrendering our role as teachers. Rather, it acknowledges that students experience more meaningful learning and are more apt to keep and apply what they learn when they are invited to help select, in a dialogue with their teachers, what activities they will engage in to improve their understanding of course content.
  • Benefits: Google Sites for ePortfolios ePortfolios offer flexibility in deciding what counts as proof of learning. We would miss a valuable opportunity if we incorporated ePortfolios into the program and then asked students to write a blue book final exam in proctored classrooms for summative assessment. Instead, we should explore the freedom that ePortfolios allow us in terms of creating writing assignments to fulfill our course outcomes. For example: ePortfolios allow us to assign, integrate, and assess shorter pieces of writing as opposed to the traditional academic essay; for example, what would a writing assignment of tweets, over a longer period of time, on a substantial question, look like in a composition classroom? These types of literacies are relevant to the world where our students will apply their writing skills from our classrooms, and employing ePortfolios for assessment allows students to assemble writing of differing lengths, formats, and purposes as evidence of advancement toward course goals.
  • Google Sites for ePortfolios • Adoption of technology, and/or Google Sites • Teaching students how to use reflection properly in the academic context – no “schmooze” or “puffery” • Making space for ePortfolios within your existing curriculum • Moving away from testing on specific content to assessing outcomes with reflection • Reading and grading ePortfolios
  • Google Sites for ePortfolios Resources for Google Sites http://cwr.olemiss.edu/for-cwr- teachers/resources/portfolios/eportfolio- support/
  • Writing with Wikipedia • How one can use Wikipedia in the classroom? Basic Model: 1. Students master some aspect of your course content 2. Students learn the basics of Wikipedia 3. Students evaluate the presence of your course content on Wikipedia 4. Students dialogue with Wikipedia editing community and propose edits to that course content 5. Students make edits 6. Students reflect on how this helped to master course outcomes
  • Writing with Wikipedia • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Schoo l_and_university_projects/2003- 2008_past_projects#Columbus_State_Universit y_.28Spring_2008.29
  • Benefits: Teaching with Wikipedia • Students write for a “real world” audience • Students transition from information consumers to information producers • Shifts your teaching role from “sage on the stage” to “guide by the side”
  • Challenges: Teaching with Wikipedia • High risk, high reward strategy • Some trolls in Wikipedia editing community • Some students find it to be too much pressure to write accurately about course content • More chaos in the classroom
  • Writing with Wikipedia • How to find out more • Wikipedia Education Program http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Education _program • Wikipedia Schools and Universities Page http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:School_and _university_projects
  • Multimodal Writing with Google Sites • http://cwr.olemiss.edu/for-cwr- teachers/resources/o-multimodality/
  • More Resources http://cwr.olemiss.edu/ cummings@olemiss.edu