Cognitive radio - the regulatory challenge [Jim Connolly]

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Jim Connolly, Senior Spectrum Adviser for Comreg presents insights from an Irish spectrum regulator point of view and what opportunities are available for parties interested in conducting wireless tests and trials in Ireland.

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Cognitive radio - the regulatory challenge [Jim Connolly]

  1. 1. 7/21/2010<br />Cognitive radio<br />The Regulatory Challenge<br />Jim Connolly<br />Senior Spectrum Advisor<br />
  2. 2. 2<br />Overview<br />Software Defined Radio & Cognitive Radio<br />Techniques for Cognitive Radio<br />Access Models<br />Opportunities for Ireland?<br />
  3. 3. Software Defined Radio (SDR)<br />A radio transmitter and/or receiver employing a technology that:<br />allows the RF operating parameters including, but not limited to, frequency range, modulation type, or output power to be set or altered by software, excluding changes to operating parameters which occur during the normal pre-installed and predetermined operation of a radio according to a system specification or standard<br />Source: ITU-R Study Group 1<br />3<br />
  4. 4. Cognitive Radio System (CR)<br />A radio system employing technology that allows the system: <br />To obtain knowledge of its operational and geographical environment, established policies and its internal state; <br />to dynamically and autonomously adjust its operational parameters and protocols according to its obtained knowledge in order to achieve predefined objectives; and <br />to learn from the results obtained<br />Source: ITU-R Study Group 1<br />4<br />
  5. 5. Techniques for Cognitive Radio (1)<br />Spectrum Sensing<br />Sense radio signals from other (nearby) radio transmitters; adjust radio transmission parameters dynamically<br />Failure to detect in-band transmitter leads to interference - the so-called “Hidden Node” problem:<br />Obstacle<br />Acannot sense B<br />Device A<br />Cognitive Radio Transceiver<br />Device B<br />Transmitter<br />Device C<br />Receiver<br />Transmission from Ainterferes with reception of C<br />5<br />
  6. 6. Techniques for Cognitive Radio (2)<br />Location Awareness & Geo-location Databases<br />Each Cognitive Radio device is able to determine its location and the location of other transmitters or receivers<br />Tries to avoid the Hidden Node problem by consulting a central database of nearby transmitters and adjusting radio parameters to avoid interference<br />Requires database(s) to be maintained; challenging<br />Cognitive Pilot Channel (CPC)<br />Dedicated carrier providing frequency usage information for the intended band in a given area. (CPC could be within the intended band or an internationally designated frequency outside the band)<br />Requires Availability, Reliability, Accuracy & Security of the information <br />6<br />
  7. 7. Access Models<br />7<br />Frequency bands & technical conditions identified & defined by regulator<br /><ul><li>Framework for trading / leasing of spectrum rights defined by regulator.
  8. 8. Spectrum identified by primary licensed users</li></ul>(OSA = Opportunistic Spectrum Access<br />Source: Ministry of Economic Affairs, The Netherlands<br />
  9. 9. Opportunities for Ireland?<br />‘Spot market’ software tools<br />Database hosting<br />Test and Trial Ireland – for trying out technology/applications www.testandtrial.ie<br />Other?<br />8<br />

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