Digital	  Humani,es	  for	     Undergraduates	          AAC&U	  2012	  
Introduc,on	  and	  Links	  Available	  Here	     hAp://blogs.nitle.org/2012/01/26/         digital-­‐humani,es-­‐for-­‐  ...
The	  Na,onal	  Ins,tute	  for	  Technology	  in	  Liberal	                 Educa,on	  (NITLE)	  |	  www.nitle.org	       ...
Humani,es	  at	  Risk	  “As	  history	  shows	  us,	  however,	  the	  arts	  and	  humani,es	  always	  risk	  falling	  ...
John	  Seely	  Brown,	  NITLE	  Fellow	  2011	  •  Explosion	  of	  data	  	  •  Exponen,al	  advances	  in	  computa,on	 ...
Kathleen	  Fitzpatrick	  “a	  nexus	  of	  fields	  within	  which	  scholars	  use	  compu,ng	  technologies	  to	  inves,...
Why	  the	  Digital	  Humani,es?	                           Provide	  wide	  access	  to	  cultural	                      ...
DH	  and	  Liberal	  Educa,on	  Alexander	  &	  Davis.	  “Should	  Liberal	  Arts	  Campuses	  Do	  Digital	  Humani1es?	 ...
Digital	  Humanists	  	       at	  Small	  Liberal	  Arts	  Colleges	  •  Angel	  David	  Nieves	  &	  Janet	  Simons,	   ...
NITLE	  Digital	  Humani,es	  •  Techne:	  hAp://blogs.nitle.org	  •  Digital	  Scholarship	  Seminars	         –  Februar...
Curricular Connections to Digital      Humanities Research:    DHi s CLASS Program       (Culture, Liberal Arts  Society S...
Multimedia Course Support 	      1.  Extensive time investment by all involved	      2.  Find or create examples or models...
http://dhinitiative.org/projects/scaffold/
Curricular Initiatives  New ModelsIndependent Projects  		      •  Independent projects as versions of Course Support	    ...
http://www.dhinitiative.org/projects/japanesefilm/demo
Culture Language Arts and Society Scholars• Two week intensive training in digital approaches to humanitiesbased research.
Angel David Nieves	Associate Professor  Chair of Africana Studies	Digital Humanities Initiative (DHi), Co-Director/Co-PI	a...
Discovery  InsightChristopher Blackwell Furman University
Engaging primary sources.
Compilation, Alignment, Analysis  Collaboration
Freely	  seen	  	  re-­‐used
Lists  More Lists
christopher.blackwell@furman.edu · folio.furman.edu
Kathryn Tomasek,Wheaton CollegeWheaton College Digital History Project
Eliza Baylies WheatonTravel Journal Pocket DiariesSpring 2005Summers 2005-2008
EncodingFinancialRecordsDay BookDaily accounting oftransactions that reflect themany business activities ofLaban Morey Whe...
Technologies of Argument: Undergraduate Literary      Scholarship   Laura McGrane, Associate Professor            Haverfor...
Guiding QuestionHow do we create and evaluate new-mediaundergraduate projects that producearchival arguments?
… OR       Where’s the final paper?
Constructing the digital archive
Integrating Digital Collections     into the Curriculum   Fostering the undergraduate as scholar•    Encouraging new forms...
Crucial components   Multi-directional navigation   Balance between user- and architect-driven modes of   reading   Multi-...
Digital Collections   ECCO (Eighteenth-Century Collections Online)   17th-18th Century Burney Coll. Newspapers   Early Ame...
Examples from Student             ArchivesWhat follows are screen shots from one student’s digitalarchive. In the “real” t...
Gastronomic Revolutions (Greg Toy, 2010)
Prior to the ratification of the Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776,many American colonists had been engaged in p...
Most of the American fruits are extremely odoriferous, and therefore  are very disgusting at first to us Europeans: on the...
Glasse, Hannah. The Art of Cookery Made Plain and Easy. Alexandria: Cottom  Stewart, 1805.(Originally published in 1747 in...
American SpecialtiesSimmons, Amelia. American Cookery. Hartford: Hudson  Goodwin, 1796.  What makes these recipes uniquely...
Evaluation   Close reading of rhetoric/terminology  creation of an     argument•    Analysis of archives as constructed ar...
Outcomes   Projects that move beyond the boundaries of the   classroom and individual institutions   Projects that encoura...
The Undergraduate ThesisPreparation for involvement in senior thesis work, and   larger projects that function trans-insti...
Jen Rajchel (BMC ‘11)Mooring Gaps: Marianne Moore’s Bryn Mawr Poetry is a Bryn MawrCollege senior English thesis in the fo...
Dramatizing poetic argument
Collaborating in new ways
Involving Undergraduates in Institutional Conversations
Re:Humanities http://news.haverford.edu/blogs/rehumanities/Tri-college Digital Humanities: http://www.brynmawr.edu/tdh/
Gabrielle Arias on   Soweto ‘76
2011 Re:Hum Alums   Alexander Benkhart (Hamilton) Fulbright Scholar, Film      Digitization in Japan   Michael Suen (Middl...
Challenges: How to Enhance              …   Direct ties between undergraduate humanistic   inquiry and private/public tech...
Further ConversationFor questions, comments and collaborative possibilities:Laura McGrane: lmcgrane@haverford.eduJen Rajch...
Digital Humanities for Undergraduates, AAC&U 2012
Digital Humanities for Undergraduates, AAC&U 2012
Digital Humanities for Undergraduates, AAC&U 2012
Digital Humanities for Undergraduates, AAC&U 2012
Digital Humanities for Undergraduates, AAC&U 2012
Digital Humanities for Undergraduates, AAC&U 2012
Digital Humanities for Undergraduates, AAC&U 2012
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Digital Humanities for Undergraduates, AAC&U 2012

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Digital Humanities for Undergraduates
The digital humanities offer one avenue for exploring the future of liberal education by pursuing essential learning goals and high impact practices in a digital context. This panel of faculty, staff and students from the Tri-College Consortium (Bryn Mawr, Haverford and Swarthmore Colleges), Furman University, Hamilton College, and Wheaton College will share how students have used digital methodologies to engage in authentic, applied research and prepare to be citizens in a networked world.
Rebecca Frost Davis, Program Officer for the Humanities, NITLE
Kathryn Tomasek, Associate Professor of History, Wheaton College
Angel David Nieves, Associate Professor of Africana Studies, Hamilton College
Janet Simons, Associate Director of Instructional Technology, Hamilton College
Christopher Blackwell, Professor of Classics, Furman University
Laura McGrane, Associate Professor of English, Haverford College
Jennifer Rajchel, Digital Humanities Intern, Library, Bryn Mawr College
This session is presented by the National Institute for Technology in Liberal Education (NITLE)
session from AAC&U 2012 annual meeting

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Digital Humanities for Undergraduates, AAC&U 2012

  1. 1. Digital  Humani,es  for   Undergraduates   AAC&U  2012  
  2. 2. Introduc,on  and  Links  Available  Here   hAp://blogs.nitle.org/2012/01/26/ digital-­‐humani,es-­‐for-­‐ undergraduates-­‐session-­‐at-­‐aacu12/  
  3. 3. The  Na,onal  Ins,tute  for  Technology  in  Liberal   Educa,on  (NITLE)  |  www.nitle.org   NITLE  helps  liberal  arts  colleges  integrate   inquiry,  pedagogy,  and  technology.    Future  of  Liberal  Educa,on  •  Digital  Humani,es  •  Libraries  and  Scholarly  Communica,ons  •  New  Learning  Resources      
  4. 4. Humani,es  at  Risk  “As  history  shows  us,  however,  the  arts  and  humani,es  always  risk  falling  from  favor,  seeming  to  some  as  ancillary  or  extrinsic,  a  frill  to  do  without,  to  cut  and  drop  when  ,mes  are  hard.”   Arts  &  Humani-es:  Toward  a  Flourishing  State?   AAC&U,  Network  for  Academic  Renewal  Conference   November  3-­‐5,  2011,  Providence,  Rhode  Island    
  5. 5. John  Seely  Brown,  NITLE  Fellow  2011  •  Explosion  of  data    •  Exponen,al  advances  in  computa,on  storage   and  bandwidth  •  Large-­‐scale,  deeply-­‐connected  problems    
  6. 6. Kathleen  Fitzpatrick  “a  nexus  of  fields  within  which  scholars  use  compu,ng  technologies  to  inves,gate  the  kinds  of  ques,ons  that  are  tradi,onal  to  the  humani,es,  or,  as  is  more  true  of  my  own  work,  who  ask  tradi,onal  kinds  of  humani,es-­‐oriented  ques,ons  about  compu,ng  technologies.”   “Repor,ng  from  the  Digital  Humani,es  2010     Conference”,  ProfHacker,  July  13,  2010     Assoc.  Professor  of  Media  Studies,  Pomona  College   Director  of  Scholarly  Communica,on,  MLA    
  7. 7. Why  the  Digital  Humani,es?   Provide  wide  access  to  cultural   informa,on   Enable  us  to  manipulate  that  data:   manage,  mash  up,  mine,  map,  model   Transform  scholarly  communica1on     Enhance  teaching  and  learning   Make  a  public  impact  Slide  courtesy  of  Lisa  Spiro.  Find  out  more:  “Why  the  Digital  Humani,es?”  
  8. 8. DH  and  Liberal  Educa,on  Alexander  &  Davis.  “Should  Liberal  Arts  Campuses  Do  Digital  Humani1es?  Process  and  Products  in  the  Small  College  World.”  In  Debates  in  the  Digital  Humani-es,  ed.  MaAhew  K.  Gold.  Minneapolis:  University  of  Minnesota  Press,  2012.  
  9. 9. Digital  Humanists     at  Small  Liberal  Arts  Colleges  •  Angel  David  Nieves  &  Janet  Simons,   Hamilton  College  •  Christopher  Blackwell,  Furman  University    •  Kathryn  Tomasek,  Wheaton  College    •  Laura  McGrane,  Haverford  College  •  Jen  Rajchel,  Bryn  Mawr  College  
  10. 10. NITLE  Digital  Humani,es  •  Techne:  hAp://blogs.nitle.org  •  Digital  Scholarship  Seminars   –  February  3  at  2  pm  EST:  Building  Scholarly   Networks:  Digital  Humani,es  Commons  •  DHCommons.org  •  Gedng  Started  in  DH   –  Lisa  Spiro,  Director,  NITLE  Labs    
  11. 11. Curricular Connections to Digital Humanities Research: DHi s CLASS Program (Culture, Liberal Arts Society Scholars) Angel David Nieves Associate Professor Chair of Africana Studies Digital Humanities Initiative (DHi), Co-Director/Co-PI Janet Thomas Simons Associate Director, Instructional Technology Digital Humanities Initiative (DHi), Co-Director/Co-PI
  12. 12. Multimedia Course Support 1.  Extensive time investment by all involved 2.  Find or create examples or models of expected outcomes. 3.  Collaborative Design - faculty with academic support 4.  Structure media assignments as a sequence of learning experiences building upon each other over the course of the semester so that content can be assimilated simultaneously with critical literacys skill development. 5.  Multiple Checkpoints for Evaluation. 6.  Public presentations of students final projects and process. http://academics.hamilton.edu/mediascholarship/index.cfm?PATH=Recommendations.html
  13. 13. http://dhinitiative.org/projects/scaffold/
  14. 14. Curricular Initiatives New ModelsIndependent Projects   •  Independent projects as versions of Course Support •  Alexander Benkhart http://www.hamilton.edu/news/story/from-ancient-to-animation-discovering-japanese-heroines •  Cinema and New Media Studies Minor http://www.hamilton.edu/academics/departments?dept=Cinema •  Research projects - Students and Faculty •  Alexander Benkhart http://www.hamilton.edu/news/story/alex-benkhart-11-awarded-fulbright-to-japan •  Erica Kowsz http://www.hamilton.edu/news/story/erica-kowsz-1-awarded-fulbright-to-canada •  Gabriela Arias http://www.hamilton.edu/news/story/gabriela-arias-11-interns-at-museo-del-barrio
  15. 15. http://www.dhinitiative.org/projects/japanesefilm/demo
  16. 16. Culture Language Arts and Society Scholars• Two week intensive training in digital approaches to humanitiesbased research.
  17. 17. Angel David Nieves Associate Professor Chair of Africana Studies Digital Humanities Initiative (DHi), Co-Director/Co-PI anieves@hamilton.edu Janet Thomas Simons Associate Director, Instructional Technology Digital Humanities Initiative (DHi), Co-Director/Co-PI simons@hamilton.edu http://www.dhinitiative.org email: dhinitiative.@hamilton.edu
  18. 18. Discovery InsightChristopher Blackwell Furman University
  19. 19. Engaging primary sources.
  20. 20. Compilation, Alignment, Analysis Collaboration
  21. 21. Freely  seen    re-­‐used
  22. 22. Lists More Lists
  23. 23. christopher.blackwell@furman.edu · folio.furman.edu
  24. 24. Kathryn Tomasek,Wheaton CollegeWheaton College Digital History Project
  25. 25. Eliza Baylies WheatonTravel Journal Pocket DiariesSpring 2005Summers 2005-2008
  26. 26. EncodingFinancialRecordsDay BookDaily accounting oftransactions that reflect themany business activities ofLaban Morey Wheatonbetween 1828 and 1859Payments Rents Land, equipment Taxes PostageLaborPurchases Food Fabrics and sewing supplies Lumber and building supplies
  27. 27. Technologies of Argument: Undergraduate Literary Scholarship Laura McGrane, Associate Professor Haverford College Jen Rajchel, Digital Initiatives Intern Bryn Mawr College Tri-College Digital Humanities Initiative AACU 2012
  28. 28. Guiding QuestionHow do we create and evaluate new-mediaundergraduate projects that producearchival arguments?
  29. 29. … OR Where’s the final paper?
  30. 30. Constructing the digital archive
  31. 31. Integrating Digital Collections into the Curriculum   Fostering the undergraduate as scholar•  Encouraging new forms of close reading, knowledge production and interpretation   Enabling original research that moves beyond a set syllabus and a specific classroom
  32. 32. Crucial components   Multi-directional navigation   Balance between user- and architect-driven modes of reading   Multi-media forms   Interdisciplinary synthesis   Student work as process versus product   Projects that open out into the public sphere
  33. 33. Digital Collections   ECCO (Eighteenth-Century Collections Online)   17th-18th Century Burney Coll. Newspapers   Early American Imprints   American Periodicals Series ARTstor   EEBO (Early English Books Online)
  34. 34. Examples from Student ArchivesWhat follows are screen shots from one student’s digitalarchive. In the “real” thing, all links are live (and many areinvisible here), and allow the reader to move throughprimary texts and arguments freely.
  35. 35. Gastronomic Revolutions (Greg Toy, 2010)
  36. 36. Prior to the ratification of the Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776,many American colonists had been engaged in political discussions anddisputes regarding the taxable status of essential food items. Indeed, due tothe successive English parliamentary acts that imposed tariffs on molasses,sugar, and tea, the colonists had become conscious of the social implicationsand political connotations of food. Although the Declaration ofIndependence and the following Revolutionary War effectively endedEngland s egregious political control over the American diet, remnants ofEnglish culture still permeated the culinary landscape of America; though theAmerican colonies successfully achieved political independence, they stillremained culturally attached to England. Consequently, situated within thisrevolutionary context, this archive endeavors to conceptualize thechanging relationship between England and America by examining thechanging culinary landscape as depicted in popular domestic guides andcookbooks; through the juxtaposition and purposeful ordering of Britishand American documents, this archive traces a second revolution.(Gregory Toy, Fall 2010)
  37. 37. Most of the American fruits are extremely odoriferous, and therefore are very disgusting at first to us Europeans: on the contrary, our fruits appear insipid to them, for want of odour. Samuel Pegge in The Forme Of Cury (1780) 1. Beef 2. Turkey 3. Salmon 2 4. American Specialties 3 1 4MainMenu
  38. 38. Glasse, Hannah. The Art of Cookery Made Plain and Easy. Alexandria: Cottom Stewart, 1805.(Originally published in 1747 in London. Later reprinted in America) The English Way Choosing Beef How would you characterize each excerpt? The American Way Simmons, Amelia. American Cookery. Hartford: Hudson Goodwin, 1796.MainMenu
  39. 39. American SpecialtiesSimmons, Amelia. American Cookery. Hartford: Hudson Goodwin, 1796. What makes these recipes uniquely American? Glasse, Hannah. The Art of Cookery Made Plain and Easy. Alexandria: Cottom Stewart, 1805. (Originally published in 1747 in London. Later reprinted in America)MainMenu
  40. 40. Evaluation   Close reading of rhetoric/terminology creation of an argument•  Analysis of archives as constructed around categories/ metadata•  Ability to integrate course materials into an original research project
  41. 41. Outcomes   Projects that move beyond the boundaries of the classroom and individual institutions   Projects that encourage the reader and user to roam freely, but within the constraints of an argument   Recognition that design choices have theoretical and cognitive impacts
  42. 42. The Undergraduate ThesisPreparation for involvement in senior thesis work, and larger projects that function trans-institutionally.
  43. 43. Jen Rajchel (BMC ‘11)Mooring Gaps: Marianne Moore’s Bryn Mawr Poetry is a Bryn MawrCollege senior English thesis in the form of a website. This essayexplores three of Marianne Moore’s Bryn Mawr poems. It combinesclose textual analysis of the poems with an interrogation of thepossibilities of a website as a critical form. My interpretation ofMarianne Moore’s work features three different analytic structures(one for each poem) to suggest that new media allow for multi-presentational critiques as well as multi-vocality.
  44. 44. Dramatizing poetic argument
  45. 45. Collaborating in new ways
  46. 46. Involving Undergraduates in Institutional Conversations
  47. 47. Re:Humanities http://news.haverford.edu/blogs/rehumanities/Tri-college Digital Humanities: http://www.brynmawr.edu/tdh/
  48. 48. Gabrielle Arias on Soweto ‘76
  49. 49. 2011 Re:Hum Alums   Alexander Benkhart (Hamilton) Fulbright Scholar, Film Digitization in Japan   Michael Suen (Middlebury) Outreach Coordinator, Learning Games Network   Evan Donahue (Brown) Senior Quality Assurance Engineer, Riverbed Technology   Evan McGonagill (Bryn Mawr) Systems Associate, Open Society Institute   Ethan Joseph (Haverford), Operations Assistant, National Symphony Orchestra
  50. 50. Challenges: How to Enhance …   Direct ties between undergraduate humanistic inquiry and private/public technologies   Opportunities for undergraduate institutions to partner with each other and R1 universities   Opportunities for undergraduates to produce original research and writing as active scholars and citizens beyond individual classrooms
  51. 51. Further ConversationFor questions, comments and collaborative possibilities:Laura McGrane: lmcgrane@haverford.eduJen Rajchel: jrajchel@brynmawr.edu

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