Good And Bad Design Overview

2,518 views
2,300 views

Published on

Published in: Technology, Business
0 Comments
2 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
2,518
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
14
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
55
Comments
0
Likes
2
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Good And Bad Design Overview

  1. 1. Good and Bad Design<br />
  2. 2. Contrast<br />Contrast with color<br />Contrast with images<br />Contrast with fonts<br />Contrast with size<br />Contrast is one of the best ways to add visual interest to your document. <br />Contrast draws in your reader&apos;s attention and creates a visual hierarchy. <br />Create contrast by using type, textures, and elements like lines, boxes, or graphics, that are very different from one another. <br />To get started, determine what you want the focus to be. Use contrast to create that focus. Remember, do as R.Williams says- &quot;Don&apos;t be a wimp!&quot;<br />Robin Williams&apos; book . <br />
  3. 3.
  4. 4.
  5. 5.
  6. 6.
  7. 7.
  8. 8.
  9. 9.
  10. 10. Repetition<br />Repetition, or consistency, means that you should repeat some aspect of the design throughout the entire document. <br />Repetition acts as a visual key that ties your piece together--in other words, it unifies it. Repetition controls the reader&apos;s eye and helps you keep their attention on the piece as long as possible. <br />Repeat elements such as a graphic, font style or size. To get started, repeat elements that you&apos;re already using.<br />
  11. 11.
  12. 12.
  13. 13.
  14. 14. Alignment<br />The principle of alignment tells us that every item on a page must be aligned with another item. The alignment of items creates cohesion.One way to align material is through the center.<br />When continuous text is aligned down the center, it is difficult to read. One problem is difference in the length of lines. This is confusing because the lengths are neither exactly the same nor are they really different.<br />
  15. 15.
  16. 16.
  17. 17.
  18. 18.
  19. 19.
  20. 20.
  21. 21. Proximity<br />The Principle of Proximity tells you to put related items close together physically. Things that aren&apos;t related should be farther apart. The amount of separation between items or groups tells your reader how the material is organized.<br />
  22. 22.
  23. 23.
  24. 24.
  25. 25.
  26. 26. References <br />Digg<br />http://www.myinkblog.com/2009/03/21/4-principles-of-good-design-for-websites/<br />Allison McMorris<br />http://coe.sdsu.edu/eet/Articles/designprin2/start.htm<br />

×