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Grantwriting for Credit Union Leagues
Grantwriting for Credit Union Leagues
Grantwriting for Credit Union Leagues
Grantwriting for Credit Union Leagues
Grantwriting for Credit Union Leagues
Grantwriting for Credit Union Leagues
Grantwriting for Credit Union Leagues
Grantwriting for Credit Union Leagues
Grantwriting for Credit Union Leagues
Grantwriting for Credit Union Leagues
Grantwriting for Credit Union Leagues
Grantwriting for Credit Union Leagues
Grantwriting for Credit Union Leagues
Grantwriting for Credit Union Leagues
Grantwriting for Credit Union Leagues
Grantwriting for Credit Union Leagues
Grantwriting for Credit Union Leagues
Grantwriting for Credit Union Leagues
Grantwriting for Credit Union Leagues
Grantwriting for Credit Union Leagues
Grantwriting for Credit Union Leagues
Grantwriting for Credit Union Leagues
Grantwriting for Credit Union Leagues
Grantwriting for Credit Union Leagues
Grantwriting for Credit Union Leagues
Grantwriting for Credit Union Leagues
Grantwriting for Credit Union Leagues
Grantwriting for Credit Union Leagues
Grantwriting for Credit Union Leagues
Grantwriting for Credit Union Leagues
Grantwriting for Credit Union Leagues
Grantwriting for Credit Union Leagues
Grantwriting for Credit Union Leagues
Grantwriting for Credit Union Leagues
Grantwriting for Credit Union Leagues
Grantwriting for Credit Union Leagues
Grantwriting for Credit Union Leagues
Grantwriting for Credit Union Leagues
Grantwriting for Credit Union Leagues
Grantwriting for Credit Union Leagues
Grantwriting for Credit Union Leagues
Grantwriting for Credit Union Leagues
Grantwriting for Credit Union Leagues
Grantwriting for Credit Union Leagues
Grantwriting for Credit Union Leagues
Grantwriting for Credit Union Leagues
Grantwriting for Credit Union Leagues
Grantwriting for Credit Union Leagues
Grantwriting for Credit Union Leagues
Grantwriting for Credit Union Leagues
Grantwriting for Credit Union Leagues
Grantwriting for Credit Union Leagues
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Grantwriting for Credit Union Leagues

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  • Source: Nonprofit Almanac 2008
  • Source: Nonprofit Almanac 2008
  • Source: Nonprofit Almanac 2008
  • Sector Wide for all nonprofits
  • Charitable giving specifically – most likely to 501c3
  • Charitable giving specifically – most likely to 501c3
  • Explain what we mean by top down inside out… Then: This applies both to BORROWING money and to RAISING MONEY
  • Typically IRC rules stricter for private foundations – regulations ensure people don’t avoid tax responsibility ultimately to benefit themselves, their businesses or friends.. The tax benefit exists b/c of the exchange: high expectation they’ll do public, charitable good. Over simplified: If endowed, must pay out 5% every year Although some new rules governing things like SUPPORTING ORGANIZATIONS and DONOR ADVISED FUNDS make life trickier these days… Why this matters: Grantseeking is about making an authentic connection between the organization WITH resources and the organization that can put those resources to work – you need to know WHO the organization is you want funds from
  • Alignment with priorities also means alignment with the funder’s resources: Request should be appropriate to funder’s ability (ie, if they only have $100k to give away, don’t ask for $125k!) Understand what they want to know and provide it to them
  • IF YOU REMEMBER ONLY ONE THING FROM THIS SESSION, THIS IS WHAT I HOPE IT IS: GRANTMAKERS EXIST FOR SOME CHARITABLE PURPOSE: THERE IS SOMETHING THEY SEEK TO ACHIEVE. THEY ARE RARELY RANDOM OR TOTALLY ARBITRARY. EFFECTIVE GRANTSEEKING IS ABOUT FINDING FUNDERS WHOSE PRIORITIES ARE THE SAME AS YOURS, AND MAKING AN AUTHENTIC CONNECTION. UNDERSTAND WHAT IT IS THEY ARE TRYING TO DO, AND THEN SHOW THEM HOW YOUR WORK HELPS THEM ACHIEVE IT. If you’re work doesn’t help them fulfill their mission, they rarely can or will fund you. Not having this alignment is the number one reason grantmakers say they reject proposals… no matter how great the proposal is, if the work doesn’t align with the funder can do and seeks to do, it won’t get funded. Here’s the other thing about alignment: Don’t just think of funders as ATMs . . . . The stronger the alignment, the more likely a funder is to be a potential partner and collaborator. They can make connections, introductions, open doors, introduce you to others doing similar or complementary work.
  • Always provide what the funder requests. This is a list of things you can commonly expect. If a funder doesn’t specify, these are the basic things I would include. Other Tips: Don’t be cute/ don’t use uneccessary graphics/ be professional Cite evidence properly/ substantiate claims Don’t use superlatives/ demonstrate your knowledge of the field and your unique position in the field Budgets: No right cost or wrong cost; what matters is that you understand the cost PER OUTCOME and can justify it
  • Style & Language Don’t be too creative – should look like a professional business document Don’t use too many fonts: one serif and one sans serif Highlight section breaks clearly Use bullets appropriately Avoid run-on sentences Never use jargon without explaining/defining words Always spell out acronyms first, showing acronym parenthetically the first time it appears Graphics only that clarify or highlight a point – not to be cute (ie, a graph or a quote, but not a cartoon) Don’t use contractions Use appropriate citations & consistency in footnotes or endnotes Pay attention to any funder specifications about page numbers and line spacing. If not specified, 1” margins and 1.5 spacing are easiest to read.
  • Style & Language Don’t be too creative – should look like a professional business document Don’t use too many fonts: one serif and one sans serif Highlight section breaks clearly Use bullets appropriately Avoid run-on sentences Never use jargon without explaining/defining words Always spell out acronyms first, showing acronym parenthetically the first time it appears Graphics only that clarify or highlight a point – not to be cute (ie, a graph or a quote, but not a cartoon) Don’t use contractions Use appropriate citations & consistency in footnotes or endnotes Pay attention to any funder specifications about page numbers and line spacing. If not specified, 1” margins and 1.5 spacing are easiest to read.
  • Style & Language Don’t be too creative – should look like a professional business document Don’t use too many fonts: one serif and one sans serif Highlight section breaks clearly Use bullets appropriately Avoid run-on sentences Never use jargon without explaining/defining words Always spell out acronyms first, showing acronym parenthetically the first time it appears Graphics only that clarify or highlight a point – not to be cute (ie, a graph or a quote, but not a cartoon) Don’t use contractions Use appropriate citations & consistency in footnotes or endnotes Pay attention to any funder specifications about page numbers and line spacing. If not specified, 1” margins and 1.5 spacing are easiest to read.
  • Style & Language Don’t be too creative – should look like a professional business document Don’t use too many fonts: one serif and one sans serif Highlight section breaks clearly Use bullets appropriately Avoid run-on sentences Never use jargon without explaining/defining words Always spell out acronyms first, showing acronym parenthetically the first time it appears Graphics only that clarify or highlight a point – not to be cute (ie, a graph or a quote, but not a cartoon) Don’t use contractions Use appropriate citations & consistency in footnotes or endnotes Pay attention to any funder specifications about page numbers and line spacing. If not specified, 1” margins and 1.5 spacing are easiest to read.
  • Style & Language Don’t be too creative – should look like a professional business document Don’t use too many fonts: one serif and one sans serif Highlight section breaks clearly Use bullets appropriately Avoid run-on sentences Never use jargon without explaining/defining words Always spell out acronyms first, showing acronym parenthetically the first time it appears Graphics only that clarify or highlight a point – not to be cute (ie, a graph or a quote, but not a cartoon) Don’t use contractions Use appropriate citations & consistency in footnotes or endnotes Pay attention to any funder specifications about page numbers and line spacing. If not specified, 1” margins and 1.5 spacing are easiest to read.
  • Style & Language Don’t be too creative – should look like a professional business document Don’t use too many fonts: one serif and one sans serif Highlight section breaks clearly Use bullets appropriately Avoid run-on sentences Never use jargon without explaining/defining words Always spell out acronyms first, showing acronym parenthetically the first time it appears Graphics only that clarify or highlight a point – not to be cute (ie, a graph or a quote, but not a cartoon) Don’t use contractions Use appropriate citations & consistency in footnotes or endnotes Pay attention to any funder specifications about page numbers and line spacing. If not specified, 1” margins and 1.5 spacing are easiest to read.
  • Style & Language Don’t be too creative – should look like a professional business document Don’t use too many fonts: one serif and one sans serif Highlight section breaks clearly Use bullets appropriately Avoid run-on sentences Never use jargon without explaining/defining words Always spell out acronyms first, showing acronym parenthetically the first time it appears Graphics only that clarify or highlight a point – not to be cute (ie, a graph or a quote, but not a cartoon) Don’t use contractions Use appropriate citations & consistency in footnotes or endnotes Pay attention to any funder specifications about page numbers and line spacing. If not specified, 1” margins and 1.5 spacing are easiest to read.
  • Style & Language Don’t be too creative – should look like a professional business document Don’t use too many fonts: one serif and one sans serif Highlight section breaks clearly Use bullets appropriately Avoid run-on sentences Never use jargon without explaining/defining words Always spell out acronyms first, showing acronym parenthetically the first time it appears Graphics only that clarify or highlight a point – not to be cute (ie, a graph or a quote, but not a cartoon) Don’t use contractions Use appropriate citations & consistency in footnotes or endnotes Pay attention to any funder specifications about page numbers and line spacing. If not specified, 1” margins and 1.5 spacing are easiest to read.
  • Style & Language Don’t be too creative – should look like a professional business document Don’t use too many fonts: one serif and one sans serif Highlight section breaks clearly Use bullets appropriately Avoid run-on sentences Never use jargon without explaining/defining words Always spell out acronyms first, showing acronym parenthetically the first time it appears Graphics only that clarify or highlight a point – not to be cute (ie, a graph or a quote, but not a cartoon) Don’t use contractions Use appropriate citations & consistency in footnotes or endnotes Pay attention to any funder specifications about page numbers and line spacing. If not specified, 1” margins and 1.5 spacing are easiest to read.
  • $787 Billion
  • Transcript

    • 1. Grantwriting for Credit Union Leagues Megan E. McNally [email_address]
    • 2. Workshop Overview
        • The Nonprofit & Funding Landscape
        • Fundamentals of Fundraising
        • Grantseeking from Private Sources
        • Public Funding
    • 3. Landscape Nonprofit Sector (2005) All nonprofits………………...……………………….. 1.4 million Reporting nonprofits……………………………………………… 530,376 Revenues……………………………………………………$1.6 trillion Expenses……………………………………………………. $1.4 trillion Assets……………………………………….………………… $3.4 trillion Public charities, 501(c)(3)………………………………………. 876,164 Reporting public charities…………………………………….. 310,368 Revenues……………………………………………………$1.1 trillion Expenses…………………………..………………………… $1.1 trillion Assets…………………………………………………..………$1.98 trillion
    • 4. Landscape Credit Union Leagues Source: National Center for Charitable Statistics search of IRS records, July 2009 $245,552,526 $101,243,532 45 133 Total $10,337,947 $5,096,075 3 4 501(c)(14) $108,247 $2,684,454 1 2 501(c)(9) $235,106,332 $93,463,003 41 127 501(c)(6) Assets Revenues Active Total IRC exemption
    • 5. Landscape Credit Union Foundations
      • Source: National Center for Charitable Statistics search of IRS records, July 2009
        • Cross referenced w/ Guidestar.org & likely missing any CU Foundations that don’t have “credit union” or “C U” in their organization names
      $51,610,741 $27,170,029 32 42 Total $24,828,541 $8,816,383 5 7 501(c)(3) pf $26,782,200 $18,353,646 27 35 501(c)(3) Assets Revenues Active Total IRC exemption
    • 6. Landscape Nonprofit Revenues (2005)
    • 7. Landscape 2008 Charitable Giving = $307.65 Billion
    • 8. Landscape
      • What’s impacting nonprofit funding?
      • New federal funding & attitude
      • State & local budget crises
      • Economic meltdown = reduction in private grants
      • Individual giving slowing more than many projected
    • 9. Landscape
      • Trends:
      • 2008 inflation adjusted decrease of 5.7%
        • is only second since 1956
      • Giving is 2.2% of GDP = good sign
      • Human Services funding (9% of total)
        • 54% reported increase in demand for services
        • 53% reported being under-funded
      • Biggest impacts expected in 2009-10
    • 10. Landscape
      • General qualities of organizations getting funded:
      • Clarity of:
        • mission, vision & values
        • theory of change
      • Grounded in understanding of:
        • key development principles
        • unique resource & capacity realities
      • Nimble enough to:
        • adapt based on unique strengths & opportunities
        • innovate within risk tolerance
      • Authentically connected to stakeholders
    • 11. Landscape
      • What’s gaining attention in asset building:
      • Innovative approaches to helping those most in need
      • Programs/ projects with high leverage
        • Private dollars that access public dollars
          • Matches to public grants
          • Programs that help people connect to public benefits/ work supports
        • Grants/ gifts that compel others to match
      • Filling gaps in continuums of service/ linking services
        • Vehicle purchase programs tied to asset building opportunities
        • Financial education linked to voluntary income tax prep assistance
        • Access to benefits tied to higher education access
    • 12. Fundamentals
      • Fundraising typically is:
        • top>down (lead gifts identified & solicited first) &
        • inside>out (closest allies engaged first for best leverage)
    • 13. Fundamentals
      • Communication is key:
      • Donor Centered Fundraising*
        • Understand & deliver what donors want
          • Prompt, personalized acknowledgement of their gifts
          • Confirmation that their gifts have been put to work as intended
          • Measurable results on their gifts at work prior to being asked again
      • Shift in fundraising focus:
        • Traditional school of thought:
          • Rule of 7 Touches
        • New school of thought:
          • Personalization & effectiveness of touch as/or more important
      * Penelope Burke, 2003
    • 14. Fundamentals
      • Preparation matters:
      • Organizations are ready to invite donors closer in when:
        • The case for support is clear & compelling
        • Leadership embraces & embodies a culture of philanthropy
        • The house is in order
      • Organizations have the capacity for effective fundraising when:
        • Roles are clear & people are in place to fill them
        • People have the time, tools & training to fulfill their roles
        • Those responsible for goals have a role in shaping the goals
    • 15. Grantseeking Research & Validate Leverage Highest Link Stewardship/ Manage Relationship Report Acknowledge Site Visit/ Due Diligence Proposal/ Application LOI/ Concept or Introduction
    • 16. Grantseeking Internal Revenue Code outlines activities of:
      • Public Charities
      • Funded by many ( the public )
          • Community Foundations
          • Fundraising Organizations
      • Private Foundations*
      • Funded by one or few
          • Independent
          • Family
          • Corporate
      • Type/ behavior
          • Operating
          • Non-Operating
      • *109,852 in US in 2006
    • 17. Grantseeking
      • Step One: Research & validate prospects
        • Establish search criteria
        • Build a suspect list
        • Due diligence to validate prospects & prioritize
        • Commit to ongoing research, validation & prioritization
      * * * Alignment is everything * * *
    • 18. Grantseeking
    • 19. Grantseeking
    • 20. Grantseeking
      • Step Two: Leverage highest link
        • Key: Highest appropriate connection
        • First contact critical: don’t miss an opportunity to start at the top if it exists
        • Always take advantage of an opportunity to discuss your organization or project first
      * * * Outsource production, but not relationships * * *
    • 21. Grantseeking
      • Step Three: Outline case in LOI
        • When required, often 2-3 page introduction
          • Clear identification of alignment
          • High level snapshot of organization
          • Specifics: amount, timeline, program/ area
          • Contact information
    • 22. Grantseeking
      • Step Four: Write the proposal or complete application
        • Sometimes, guidelines provide for you to write a document
        • Sometimes, an online application w/ space limited responses
        • Always, provide information requested, in order requested
        • Often supplementary documentation required
      * * * Plan the work with a checklist & timeline * * *
    • 23. Grantseeking
      •   Why proposals get funded
      • Solid alignment with funder priorities
      • Clear, organized responses to requested information
      • Budget adds up, makes sense, can be substantiated
      • Professional and credible presentation of the organization’s capacity for the work
    • 24. Grantseeking
      •   Why proposals get rejected :
        • Don’t align w/ funders’ priorities
        • Don’t follow guidelines/ answer requested info
        • Budgets don’t add up or support narrative
        • Don’t demonstrate knowledge of field or competition
        • Not measurable or realistic
        • OR not compelling enough
    • 25. Grantseeking The goal
    • 26. Grantseeking
      • Common Proposal Elements:
        • Cover sheet and/or cover letter
        • Overview or executive summary
        • Statement of the need , problem or opportunity
        • Solution or theory of change & explanation of how the applicant is qualified and positioned to deliver this solution
        • Project specifics : timeline & workplan/actions, objectives & outcomes
        • Evaluation : plan for measuring outcomes
        • Budget & sustainability : costs, revenues and how the project will be funded once this particular grant is spent
        • Supporting documentation as requested
    • 27. Grantseeking
      • Other questions often asked:
        • Provide baseline information and metrics in the areas that this project is intended to improve.
        • Describe how you hope the successful completion of the project will benefit individuals and/or a community after the grant has ended.
        • How will this work contribute to the field?
        • What challenges do you anticipate, and what plans are in place for mitigation?
    • 28. Grantseeking   Tools, like logic models, help organize the writing:
    • 29. Grantseeking  
    • 30. Grantseeking  
    • 31. Grantseeking
      • Evaluation
      • Organizational Values About Evaluation
        • Why measure results?
        • What do you do with the information?
      • Approach & Methodology
        • How have you measured results before?
        • What systems, metrics, tools might you use?
        • Who does the evaluation, and how is it funded?
        • Is it reflected in the budget?
      • Alignment w/ the work you’re proposing
        • Use logic model as guide to identify outcomes
        • What are the indicators of success toward outputs/ outcomes?
    • 32. Grantseeking
      • Sample of what funders look for in a project budget:
      • Does it make sense?
      • Does it support the work described?
      • Is it consistent with the organization’s budget and size?
      • Is the staffing adequate?
      • What is the cost per client/ outcome?
      • Do the costs seem reasonable relative to similar work?
      • Are the income expectations realistic and supported?
      • What is the plan for sustainability/ our exit?
    • 33. Grantseeking
      • … vs. in an organizational budget:
      • Are there appropriate sources of income?
      • Are they appropriately diversified?
      • How is the budget structured – does it make sense?
      • Does it demonstrate smart financial management?
      • Is there appropriate cash on hand? A healthy reserve?
      • Does it reconcile to cash flow?
      • Are administrative costs appropriate and sufficient?
    • 34. Grantseeking
      • Budget basics:
      • Revenues should reflect
        • Committed funds
        • For a project/ program, the portion allocated from the organization
      • Expenses should reflect
        • Direct & indirect costs
        • Total cost of the work, not just the parts requested
      • Use budget narrative to explain
        • How/ from whom you expect to raise other funds needed for the work described
        • Path to “sustainability” – meaning how the work will go on once grant funding runs out
    • 35. Grantseeking Budget Example: Funder’s Grant Delineated From Other Funds
    • 36. Grantseeking Budget Example : Multi-Year Roll-Up Without Funds Delineated
    • 37. Grantseeking Common Supporting Document Requested Are key staff experienced for the work? Key Staff Bios Who governs and leads? What is their experience, connection, expertise? Are you in good hands? Board Roster Do you have what you need for the work you do? Relevant Licenses/ dependent upon area of work Are you running a legitimate business? Articles of Incorporation Are you tax exempt? Can they fund you? IRS Determination Letter Who supports you? Do those closest to you? Donor/ Funder List Are your stories the same? What’s the balance of program v. admin expenses? Form 990 Are books consistently reviewed, and is there evidence of smart fiscal management? Audited financials and/or recent statements (P&L/ Asset) Is the project aligned? Can the org support it? Organizational budget What The Funder Wants To Know: What You Are Asked For:
    • 38. Grantseeking
      • Notes on Style & Language:
      • Make it easy to read
        • Don’t be too creative
        • Highlight section breaks clearly
        • Use bullets appropriately
        • Protect document intregrity: use footers w/ org name & Page X of Y
        • PDF when permitted
      • Make it easy to understand
        • Avoid jargon
        • Explain acronyms
        • Graphics only that clarify or highlight a point
        • Cite evidence/ support claims
    • 39. Grantseeking
      • Final Points on grantwriting:
      • Elevate the field
        • Demonstrate knowledge of others’ work
        • Show how you’ll complement or build on it
        • Never criticize others’ work & never claim superlatives
      • Make life easy for the reviewer
        • A person will review your request, but often they don’t make the final decision
        • They have feelings, biases & passions, just like you do
        • They have a job they’re responsible for, just like you do
        • Make it easy for them to want be your ally, they aren’t obligated to
    • 40. Grantseeking
      • Step Five: Site Visits/ Funders’ Due Diligence
        • Learn as much as possible about what they hope to learn from the visit or their inquiries
        • Schedule site visits at a time/ venue that allows them to really see your best work
        • Prepare, but don’t script
        • ALWAYS follow up w/ email and voice mail to the person/ people who spent time learning more about your work
      * * * Be responsive & helpful while they do their job * * *
    • 41. Grantseeking
        • Step Six: Acknowledgement once funded
        • To Funder:
        • Sign & return contract/ keep signed copy
        • Formal letter from leadership acknowledging receipt & restating details
        • Personal thank you to visitors
        • To Public:
        • Get Grantor’s permission
        • Press release only if newsworthy (rare)
        • Web/ annual report/ newsletter etc… BE CONSISTENT with how you acknowledge funders
    • 42. Grantseeking
        • Step Seven: Reporting
        • Formal:
        • Ask & get clarity on requirements including dates, formats/ templates
        • Always a final report, even if not asked
        • Informal:
        • Ask the PO how often they want to hear from you
        • Communicate substantive changes re: leadership, budget, deliverables
        • Reach out strategically 1-2x during grant period
      * * * Keep open channels of communications * * *
    • 43. Grantseeking
        • Step Eight: Steward the Relationship
        • Be a resource:
        • Share key lessons, research, findings in mutual field of interest
        • Extend an offer to share lessons/ collaborate w/ other grantees
        • Be respectful:
        • Know & honor policies about repeat funding
        • Communicate strategically & thoughtfully , not opportunistically
        • Be resourceful:
        • If appropriate, invite dialogue about PRI’s or other resources
        • Ask for 1-2 specific, strategic introductions or referrals
    • 44. Public Funding
      • Public Funding = government funding
        • Federal
        • Tribal
        • State
        • County
        • Municipal
        • District
    • 45. Public Funding
      • Keys to accessing public funds:
        • Follow policy priorities & trends
        • Track budget, authorization & appropriations processes
        • Study how each level of government is organized as it relates to your work
        • Bookmark the websites of those departments & agencies and pay attention to what they’re doing to know in advance of Notices of Funding Availability
    • 46. Public Funding
      • Federal Funds:
        • Notices published in federal register
        • Most agencies coordinate grants via Grants.gov
          • No registration required to get notices, but lengthy registration required to submit applications
        • Must have adequate capacity to manage rigorous application, implementation & reporting requirements
        • Typically very specific funding opportunities
        • Often ≥ 20% private match required
        • Right now focus on ARRA & new federal budget
    • 47. Public Funding
    • 48. Public Funding
    • 49. Public Funding
      • Federal Budget
      • Significant funding w/in Depts & Agencies for Nonprofits
        • Department of Education
          • $10M - Promise Neighborhoods (planning grants to development plans modeled on Harlem Children’s Zone)
        • Health & Human Services
          • $1.7B - Social Services Block Grant
          • $741M - programs serving refugees
        • Housing and Urban Development
          • $1B - Housing Trust Fund
          • $8.1B - project based rental assistance
          • $250M – Choice Neighborhood Fund (link to Promise Neighborhoods)
    • 50. Public Funding
      • Federal Budget
      • Capacity & Technical Assistance
      • within agency budgets, ie:
        • Treasury - CDFI
        • HUD - Neighborhood Stabilization
      • specific programs
        • Strengthening Communities Fund
        • Social Innovation Fund
        • Nonprofit Capacity Building Initiative
    • 51. Workshop Review
      • Key Take Aways & Burning Questions:
        • The Nonprofit & Funding Landscape
        • Fundamentals of Fundraising
        • Grantseeking from Private Sources
        • Public Funding
    • 52. Thank You. Megan E. McNally [email_address]

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