NEFF Event - Eat better start better

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Presentation from Aileen Wallace at the NEFF event in Durham 22nd May 2013

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  • Formerly known as the School Food Trust, we started our work in 2005 and became a registered charity in 2006 We provide specialist advice, training and support to anyone who provides food for children.
  • From April 2011 to autumn 2013 - commissioned by the Department for Education to deliver a two-year programme to improve food provision for children aged 1-5 in early years settings in England and at home. The Eat Better, Start Better programme supports the Government’s vision of high quality health services, early education and care for young children and their families ; it focuses on early intervention, child development and parental engagement.  
  • - Explain that over the last 10 years, there have been may reports published which highlight how important the foundation years are to children’s future health and development. - - Marmot report into reducing health inequalities published in 2010, and makes clear that the foundations for human development are laid in early childhood. The report stresses the importance of giving children the best start in life to reducing health inequalities - These foundation years are also important for the development of healthy eating habit for childhood and adulthood. Marmot (2010) Giving every child the best start in life is crucial to reducing health inequalities across the life course. The foundations for virtually every aspect of human development – physical, intellectual and emotional – are laid in early childhood. What happens during these early years (starting in the womb) has lifelong effects on many aspects of health and well-being. Field (2010) We have found overwhelming evidence that children’s life chances are most heavily predicated on their development in the first five years of life. It is family background, parental education, good parenting and the opportunities for learning and development in those crucial years that together matter more to children than money, in determining whether their potential is realised in adult life. Dyson (2009 cited in Tickell (2011) A child’s experiences during their early years provide the essential foundations for life. Their development during this period influences their basic learning, educational attainment, economic participation and health. Different parts of the brain develop in different sensitive windows of time. The estimated prime window for emotional development is up to 18 months, by which time the foundation of this has been shaped by the way in which the prime carer interacts with the child. Emotional development takes place throughout childhood, and there is a further reorganisation during early adolescence. Allen, G. (2010): Different parts of the brain develop in different sensitive windows of time. The estimated prime window for emotional development is up to 18 months, by which time the foundation of this has been shaped by the way in which the prime carer interacts with the child. Emotional development takes place throughout childhood, and there is a further reorganisation during early adolescence. Cooke et al cited in Sorhaindho & Feinstein (2006) and Feinstein et al. (2008): Research suggests that a child’s tastes and eating habits are formed early in life with consequences for child health and obesity and for attainment.
  • Information about children’s diets available from the national diet and nutrition survey, carried out as a rolling programme. Intakes of vitamin A, iron and zinc are low for a significant minority of children with 9%, 8% and 6% respectively having intakes that are unlikely to be sufficient (below LRNI) Intakes of saturated fat are on average 14.8% of energy (compared with recommended max of 11% for population which is appropriate for children of this age) intakes of NMES are slightly above recommended levels (11.4% compared with 11%) intakes of salt are higher than recommended – 3.2g per day compared with recommended maximum of 2g for this age group. This would also not include salt added during cooking or at the table, which would increase this further.
  • the Trust was asked by the DfE to establish and manage an independent panel of experts to look at food in early years settings in early 2010, and the panel were asked to look at the need for increased guidance or standards for food in early years settings. - The panel’s final report was submitted to Government in November 2010 to inform Dame Clare Tickell’s review of the EYFS, and was published on the Trust website in March 2011.
  • - The aim of the course is to enable health and early years professionals to support early years settings to understand and use the new guidelines, and to measure the impact of this in their area.
  • - Run through the learning objectives for the course 1 (today’s course) as listed on the slide. - Explain that a copy of these learning objectives is included on the training programme (agenda) which is included in the delegate file, and that the evaluation will check whether these points have been met at the end of the day and afterwards.
  • - the course for EY practitioners includes an initial 2 day course, followed by a further day after several months. - course 2 aims to develop an understanding of the food and drink guidelines for early years practitioners, plus develop their confidence to run healthy cooking sessions with families, and to measure the impact of these.
  • - The learning outcomes for course 2 (for the EY practitioners) are listed on the slide. They include information about nutrition and the guidelines, practical cookery and demonstration skills and improving skills in running practical cooking sessions with families.
  • NEFF Event - Eat better start better

    1. 1. North East Food ForumDurham, 22ndMay 2013Eileen Wallace, Regional Manager, Lets Get Cooking Children’s Food TrustEat Better, Start Better - improving health outcomesfor children in the early years
    2. 2. Today’s presentation will cover:• Introduction to the Children’s Food Trust (formerly the SchoolFood Trust)• Overview of the Eat Better, Start Better programme• Importance of Early Years nutrition• Outline of the Voluntary Food and Drink Guidelines for Early YearsSettings in England and practical support tools• Accessing further information, support and training2
    3. 3. The Children’s Food TrustOur Vision: A healthy future for every childOur mission: Our children must be healthy inorder to reach their full potential in life.Through ensuring a balanced diet intheir early years and school days,together with better family cooking skills,lifestyle and food education.The Children’s Food Trust exists to helpprotect every child’s right to eat better –and so, to do better3
    4. 4. The Children’s Food TrustWe all have a duty of care toact now – start earlyOur goals:All our work drives one or more of thesethree goals.1. We will protect child health throughpromoting relevant legislation andguidelines, and monitoring theirimpact.2. We will maximise the number ofchildren benefiting from the legislationand guidelines in educational settings.3. We will help improve children’s out ofschool eating and lifestylebehaviours.4
    5. 5. 5Overview of Eat Better,Start Better programme• Aim: to support healthier food provision in early years settings and families withyoung children.• Two year project (2011-2013)• Year 1 (2011-2012):• Development and testing new ‘Voluntary Food and Drink Guidelines forEarly Years Settings in England’ and practical tools.• Development and pilot testing a comprehensive training package incollaboration with five local authorities/primary care trusts.• Year 2 (2012-2013):• Implement a wider roll out of a comprehensive training package up to 20local authority areas.• Supported by: Department for Education ‘Improving Outcomes for Children, YoungPeople and Families’ Voluntary and Community Sector (VCS) grant.
    6. 6. Three key outcomes1. Improved healthier food provision for children under five inearly years and childcare settings and at home.2. Increased food, nutrition and healthy cooking knowledge andskills for the early years and childcare workforce.3. Increased food and nutrition knowledge and practical cookingskills for parents and families attending early years settings.6
    7. 7. Why introduce food and drink guidelinesfor early years settings and a foodnutrition and healthy cookingprogramme?7
    8. 8. Importance of early years and earlyinterventionMarmot review (2010) Field (2010) Allen (2011)8
    9. 9. Importance of children’s early years• children’s early years influence their health, development,learning, attainment and economic participation• eating habits during children’s early years, influence growth,development and academic achievement in later life• giving every child the best start in life is crucial to reducinghealth inequalities across the life courseKey messageThe early years of a child’s life are critically important• in their own right• as a foundation of success at school and for all adult life9
    10. 10. Young children’s diets and health in EnglandDiets of young children in England are often:•low in fruit and vegetables•low in iron, zinc and vitamin A•high in saturated fat, sugar and saltConsequences for children’s health•more than a fifth of children are either overweight or obese by thetime they join reception class•type II diabetes starting to appear in children•poor dental health in many young children•cases of rickets appearing more frequently•more than one in four young children are at risk of iron deficiency10
    11. 11. Recommendations for guidanceLaying the Table report recommended‘Government should introduce guidancethat helps practitioners meet the welfarerequirement for the provision of healthy,balanced and nutritious food and drink’.Advisory Panel on Food and Nutrition inEarly Years (2010)11“I recommend that the Government acton the report of the Advisory Panel forFood and Nutrition in Early Years andconsider providing further advice andgood practice for practitioners”.Dame Clare Tickell 2011
    12. 12. Meeting the welfare requirementfor food and drinkStatutory Framework for the EarlyYears Foundation Stage (EYFS)section 3.45 states ‘Where childrenare provided with meals, snacks anddrinks, they must be healthy, balancedand nutritious’ (2012)12New national guidanceVoluntary Food and DrinkGuidelines for Early YearsSettings in England (2012)
    13. 13. Guidance for food in early years settingsEarly Years Foundation Stage (EYFS)framework requires food and drinkprovided in regulated settings to be‘healthy, balanced and nutritious’Advisory Panel on Food and Nutrition inEarly Years (2010) recommended thatfurther guidance and advice should beproduced for practitioners to help themmeet this requirement13
    14. 14. The practical guideSeven sections01 Eat better, start better: why healthyeating matters for young children02 Planning menus03 The food and drink guidelines04 At a glance – the food and drinkguidelines for each meal and snack05 How to encourage children to eat well06 Practical tools and resources07 Where to find additional information14
    15. 15. 15Course 1: outlineThe new Voluntary Food and DrinkGuidelines for Early Years Settingsin England– Target audience: early years and healthprofessionals– Length: one day (six learning hours)– Aim: to enable them to support early yearssettings to understand and use theVoluntary Food and Drink Guidelines forEarly Years Settings in England, thepractical tools and to measure the impact ofguidelines– Evaluation: delegate feedback on course,baseline and follow up audits in early yearssettings.
    16. 16. Course 1:learning outcomesDemonstrate an understanding of:• why good nutrition is important for young children• the Voluntary Food and Drink Guidelines for Early Years Settings in Englandand supporting practical tools• appropriate types, amounts and frequencies of food and drink to provide tomeet the nutrient requirements of children aged one to five years.Confidently support settings to:• understand and use the food and drink guidelines and practical tools to plantheir menus• encourage children to eat well, including having appropriate portion sizes• self-evaluate their approach to and provision of food and drink and identifyareas for improvement• confidently audit early years settings’ approach to and provision of food anddrink to measure the impact of the introduction of the food and drinkguidelines.16
    17. 17. 17Course 2a and 2b:outlineHealthy food and cooking for families– Target audience: early years practitioners– Length: a two-day course plus one follow-upday (18 learning hours).– Aim: to develop understanding of the food anddrink guidelines and practical resources forearly years settings. Develop confidence to runhealthy cooking sessions with families andmeasure the impact on their cooking and eatinghabits.– Evaluation: delegate feedback on course,online reporting of cooking sessions withfamilies, and a family food behaviourquestionnaire (additional extra).
    18. 18. Course 2a and 2b:learning outcomes18Improve understanding, knowledge and skills relating to:•why good nutrition is important for young children•the Voluntary Food and Drink Guidelines for Early Years Settings in England•food safety and hygiene, preparation and handling•preparing a range of healthy, nutritious, low-cost family meals•adapting recipes to make them suitable for one to five-year-olds•appropriate portion sizes for one to five-year-olds•how to read food labels•different approaches to demonstrating cooking skills•how to run effective training sessions and manage cooking groups•how to support families to plan and shop for healthy food on a budget•how to use the cooking session plans with families and run community food activities•how to complete the Eat Better, Start Better online reports and how to administer thefood behaviour questionnaires with families.
    19. 19. Three key outcomes1. Improved healthier food provision for children under five inearly years and childcare settings and at home.2. Increased food, nutrition and healthy cooking knowledge andskills for the early years and childcare workforce.3. Increased food and nutrition knowledge and practical cookingskills for parents and families attending early years settings.19
    20. 20. 20Supporting local authoritiesand primary care trusts• tackling food poverty and healthinequalities• providing early intervention to maintainhealthy growth and weight• supporting settings to meet the welfarerequirement• providing information and training• ensuring access to up-to-date, consistent,evidence-based food and nutrition advice• engaging parentsAddressing health and wellbeing earlyyears priorities by:
    21. 21. Thank you21Eileen.wallace@childrensfoodtrust.org.uk

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