Youth co-production in libraries
Key facts•   17.5 million under 25s in the UK today•   21.9% of under 25s unemployed•   40% of young people volunteer•   8...
Young people and libraries• 80% of 11-15 year olds  use libraries (up 6%)• 55% of 15-24 year olds  use libraries• Involvin...
How libraries are responding: SRC•   3891 volunteers recruited in 117 library services•   96.4% of volunteers gained skill...
How libraries are responding                                            UK• 18 authorities in 4 regions (NE, NW, SE, Londo...
Shared library reading offer to the              public
Vision• Reading for pleasure enhances people’s literacy, life  chances and quality of life. It is vital for our prosperity...
Universal Reading Offer“This age of austerity will end; we have to think about thefuture. Let’s not implement cuts in a wa...
Rationale: looking beyond the age of              austerity• Building on growth and public demand for lively,  engaging of...
Strategy elements• 100% of authorities offering agreed baseline elements of  contemporary reading service, defined in LGG ...
Logic Model framework
Toolbox to deliver offer efficiently                                               SCL Prioritised Toolbox            Enha...
Progress reportStage one complete: strategy agreed; 170 authorities committed to 2012-15delivery across England, Wales, NI...
Youth Innovation Network    74 AuthoritiesReading for pleasure enhances people’s literacy, lifechances and quality of life...
“Before being involved in MyVoice, I would never have dreamed I could help organize author events or interview   people, I...
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Youth co-production in libraries

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Miranda McKearney, The Reading Agency's Director, presents figures on youth engagement in libraries and talks about how The Reading Agency is working with libraries to develop new ways for young people to get involved in their local libraries within the context of the Universal Reading Offer.

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  • Its wonderful to see the fruits of everyone’s combined efforts and investment- children’s issues have risen for 7 years running, SRC continues to grow alongside other shared programmes delivering quality resources to readers of all ages and national partnerships are adding huge value to the local reading offer.We have come a long way but we are facing a huge challenge. These assets are being seriously threatened by local authority cuts which has led to a big bit of thinking as part of our shared work plan with SCL about the best way to work in tough times to keep up the momentum of libraries’ brilliant reading work. We have been working with SCL Books and reading group chaired by Tony Durcan, represented here virtually, on how we safeguard the sparkle and impact of the public library reading service in tough times. We’re calling this the national or universal reading offer and think it’s the next big staging post on the reader development journey. It is, as Tony says, a national strategy focused on working together to do a few really big things better. Its part of a suite of interlocking SCL offers focused on 4 key areas digital, health, information and reading.
  • Youth co-production in libraries

    1. 1. Youth co-production in libraries
    2. 2. Key facts• 17.5 million under 25s in the UK today• 21.9% of under 25s unemployed• 40% of young people volunteer• 88% of youth media stories are negativeRecession impacts disadvantaged disproportionately:• 70% of excluded pupils have poor basic literacy.• People with poor literacy least likely to be employed at 30• Reading for pleasure is the only out-of-school activity for 16s linked to securing managerial/ professional jobs
    3. 3. Young people and libraries• 80% of 11-15 year olds use libraries (up 6%)• 55% of 15-24 year olds use libraries• Involving young people builds communication, literacy and civic participation skills
    4. 4. How libraries are responding: SRC• 3891 volunteers recruited in 117 library services• 96.4% of volunteers gained skills and experience• 207 volunteers received accreditation• 81% of SRC volunteers would like to continue
    5. 5. How libraries are responding UK• 18 authorities in 4 regions (NE, NW, SE, London)• 21 reading hubs, with 314 steering group members• 7132 young people taken part in 526 MyVoiceUK writing and reading events• 564 young volunteers involved (as planners, champions, reporters)• 61 working towards/ achieved accreditation
    6. 6. Shared library reading offer to the public
    7. 7. Vision• Reading for pleasure enhances people’s literacy, life chances and quality of life. It is vital for our prosperity• Libraries aim to be a force for social change through reading. They bring people recreation and pleasure, learning and literacy, health and wellbeing• Libraries will work collectively to develop their contribution to everybody’s reading life• Libraries will develop as hubs drawing communities together to bring reading alive, physically and digitally• Libraries will work with the public to co-deliver reading
    8. 8. Universal Reading Offer“This age of austerity will end; we have to think about thefuture. Let’s not implement cuts in a way that ends up with auniformly grey, dull offer to the public, without any real socialimpact. We must hang on to the sparkle in the new lookreading service we’re creating. There is evidence of a hugepublic demand for our reading groups, author events, rhymetimes, reading challenges, festivals. The new strategy we’reproposing is about us all putting our collective energy into afew really big things to keep the sparkle going”Tony Durcan, Chair of the Books and Reading Group, Societyof Chief Librarians
    9. 9. Rationale: looking beyond the age of austerity• Building on growth and public demand for lively, engaging offer with reading groups, challenges, author events• Keeping things moving forward/ continued innovation• Focusing on doing fewer, bigger things together – economies of scale and sharing best practise.• Keeping partners on board and investing; delivering free resources and capacity and profile
    10. 10. Strategy elements• 100% of authorities offering agreed baseline elements of contemporary reading service, defined in LGG Logic Model framework• Deliver a minimum universal offer locally by using national toolbox• Aiming for 80% -100% of authorities using prioritised tools in national toolbox of programmes, partnerships and calendar spikes• Prioritised tools are those currently used by at least 60% of authorities• Baseline offer enhanced by use of additional toolbox with national, regional and local initiatives• National partners committed to helping deliver the offer• Shared evidence bank and advocacy statements showing social impact• Shared approach to workforce development• Innovation strands: digital, health, public involvement• Strategic framework for voluntary sector partners to express offer to libraries, feed in impact evidence etc. Toolbox approach draws in key partners eg Share the Vision, Booktrust, National Literacy Trust
    11. 11. Logic Model framework
    12. 12. Toolbox to deliver offer efficiently SCL Prioritised Toolbox Enhanced Offer Toolbox Calendar Programme Calendar Innovation & Universal Reading Offer Programme hooks HooksLibrary Offer DevelopmentFree Reading groups Summer World Book Letterbox Club National story EvidenceCommunity and social Reading Day/World telling week reading Challenge SharedSpace Book Night Premier activities National evidence bank LeagueOnline Six Book Reading Learning Hook Reading Stars library dayaccess/Virtual Challenge Innovation promotionsServices Black history ns Bookstart Booked Up Digital Reading TRA Reading monthExpert Advice challenges for Promotions Week adults and Other Local history Healthand Support Programme children Summer Programmes monthFree Books Reading TBC Co-production: Author event / Mood Challenge National RG YoungMultimedia performances Boosting Partnerships Day people/MyReading Books Bookgifting Health and VoiceResources TV Book Club Make noise in Reading Well Being Public Hook libraries Workforce LocalCommunity Groups for involvement/ DevelopmentsOutreach Everyone Carers Week ReadingServices Coproduction including Chatterbooks Older people Training to ServiceTargeted Information day support theaudiences /sign posting Bookstart and URO BookTime Local Activities(families, CYP, AccessibilityOlder people) Services Art org PartnershipsInformation Targeted Health activities for Readingand Partners Schoolssignposting specific audiences e.g. BBC LiteratureLearning space ethnic Festivalsand support Quick Reads Online reading, Readers Days resources andLocal and Charities e.g. activitesfamily history RNIB, Local Launchresources Booktrust Events
    13. 13. Progress reportStage one complete: strategy agreed; 170 authorities committed to 2012-15delivery across England, Wales, NIStage two: focus on resources, training, advocacy, regional priority setting,fundraising• Toolkit for first “hook” – health and well being – piloted October/November• Used as platform for government advocacy: November LGA think tank; Cabinet Office support• Used as planning tool in library joining pilots• Used as basis of strategic approach to SCL regional priority setting; Bridge discussions; fundraising through Grants for the Arts• Integration of Arts Mark and Arts Award into prioritised programmes• Used as platform for partnership development, e.g. mass commitment to World Book Day leveraging extra supportWork progressing on integrating all four SCL national offers, with possible Novemberlaunch.
    14. 14. Youth Innovation Network 74 AuthoritiesReading for pleasure enhances people’s literacy, lifechances and quality of life. It is vital for our prosperityLibraries aim to be a force for social change throughreading. They bring people recreation and pleasure,learning and literacy, health and wellbeingLibraries will work collectively to develop theircontribution to everybody’s reading lifeLibraries will develop as hubs drawing communitiestogether to bring reading alive, physically and digitallyLibraries will work with the public to co-deliver reading
    15. 15. “Before being involved in MyVoice, I would never have dreamed I could help organize author events or interview people, I would have been really scared and worried.There’s so many skills I’ve learnt, and things it’s opened me up to do, and I’m much better at reading now, and moreconfident all round. Having Padgate Library with MyVoiceopportunities stops kids hanging around on the street, and gets them to see what libraries can do for them”. Tom Hotson, 15, Warrington

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