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REAC Inspection: Door Defects
REAC Inspection: Door Defects
REAC Inspection: Door Defects
REAC Inspection: Door Defects
REAC Inspection: Door Defects
REAC Inspection: Door Defects
REAC Inspection: Door Defects
REAC Inspection: Door Defects
REAC Inspection: Door Defects
REAC Inspection: Door Defects
REAC Inspection: Door Defects
REAC Inspection: Door Defects
REAC Inspection: Door Defects
REAC Inspection: Door Defects
REAC Inspection: Door Defects
REAC Inspection: Door Defects
REAC Inspection: Door Defects
REAC Inspection: Door Defects
REAC Inspection: Door Defects
REAC Inspection: Door Defects
REAC Inspection: Door Defects
REAC Inspection: Door Defects
REAC Inspection: Door Defects
REAC Inspection: Door Defects
REAC Inspection: Door Defects
REAC Inspection: Door Defects
REAC Inspection: Door Defects
REAC Inspection: Door Defects
REAC Inspection: Door Defects
REAC Inspection: Door Defects
REAC Inspection: Door Defects
REAC Inspection: Door Defects
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REAC Inspection: Door Defects

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Full name: Critical Elements of the REAC Inspection: Exterior, Common Area, and Unit Doors. This is a non-narrated, non-audio, self paced version of the video presentation we will make available on …

Full name: Critical Elements of the REAC Inspection: Exterior, Common Area, and Unit Doors. This is a non-narrated, non-audio, self paced version of the video presentation we will make available on our training web site as part of our upcoming complete online REAC training program.

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  • 1. Critical Elementsof the REAC Inspection:Exterior, Common Area, and Unit Doors Presented by The Inspection Group and REACSolutions Created and Narrated by
  • 2. ? This is a non-narrated version.
  • 3. Doors• Face it: doors are everywhere. Every building has nearly as many doors as it does rooms – probably more.• Doors get more use, and abuse, than anything in a building, except for the floors.• Door defects represent, by far, the most frequently cited defects in the course of most REAC inspections.
  • 4. Doors• As the inspector walks through the building, he or she is likely to use, and observe the condition of, every door.• There are no fewer than SIX distinct types of Door Damage, according the REAC protocol.• While Door Defects are not the highest scoring defects, they are the most consistently observed and cited of all defect types.
  • 5. Doors• Door defects can be cited at the Building Exterior, Common Area, and Unit levels.• Multiple defects can be cited on a single door.• While it is unlikely, Door Defects could conceivably account for scoring losses of as high as 45 points. Door defects often have a very significant effect on the outcome of the inspection.
  • 6. The 6 Types of Door Deficiencies• Damaged Frames/Threshold/Lintels/Trim• Damaged Hardware/Locks• Damaged Surface (Holes/Paint/Rusting/Glass)• Damaged/Missing Screen/Storm/Security Door• Deteriorated/Missing Caulking/Seals• Missing Door
  • 7. Important Note:• The following definitions are NOT the original, legal door definitions as published by REAC. We have taken the liberty of combining the most important elements of the Building Exterior, Common Area, and Unit level Door definitions to simplify the learning process. The principles are the same in each case.• By eliminating the insignificant differences in language, and studying the similarities, it becomes easier to understand the criteria that determine the definition of door deficiencies in any situation.
  • 8. Damaged Frames/Threshold/Lintels/Trim• Deficiency: You see a frame, header, jamb, threshold, lintel, or trim that is warped, split, cracked, or broken.• Level 2: At least one door is not functioning or cannot be locked because of damage to the frame, threshold, lintel, or trim.• Level 3: At least one entry, bathroom/restroom, fire door or emergency exit door is not functioning or cannot be locked because of damage to the frame, threshold, lintel, or trim.
  • 9. In this Unit, a bedroom door did not latch due to the way the door frame or jamb was split, because this prevented the striker plate from accepting the bolt (latch) when the door was closed. - Unit, - Doors, - Damaged Frames/Threshold/ Lintel/Trim, - Level 2Level 2: At least one door is notfunctioning or cannot be lockedbecause of damage to the frame,threshold, lintel, or trim. If this was a bathroom or entry door it would be Level 3.
  • 10. In this case, the badly bent door frame put this door in a bind when closed. The door had a self-closing mechanism which could not work, but the issue was caused more by the frame damage than the condition of the closer, so it was cited under “Damage Frame” rather than “Hardware.”Building Exterior, Doors,Damaged Frame/Threshold/Lintel/Trim,Level 3 Level 3: At least one entry, fire door or emergency exit door is not functioning or cannot be locked because of damage to the frame, threshold, lintel, or trim.
  • 11. Damaged Hardware/Locks• Deficiency: The attachments to a door that provide hinging, hanging, opening, closing, or security are damaged or missing. These include locks, panic hardware, overhead door tracks, springs and pulleys, sliding door tracks and hangers, and door closures.• Level 1: A closet door does not function or lock as it should because of damage to the door’s hardware.• Level 2: One door does not function as it should or cannot be locked because of damage to the door’s hardware.• Level 3: One door’s panic hardware does not function as it should. - OR -• One entry, bathroom/restroom, fire door or emergency exit door does not function as it should or cannot be locked because of damage to the door’s hardware.
  • 12. Damaged Hardware/Locks• Notes:• 1. If a door is designed to have locks, the locks should work.• 2. If a door is not designed to have locks, do not record a deficiency for not having a lock.• 3. If a lock has been removed as a “reasonable accommodation” in a 504/ADA unit, do not record a deficiency.• 4. For public housing only, if a lock on a bedroom door is missing or damaged, do not record it as a deficiency. (Must still latch and open properly!)
  • 13. Building ExteriorDoorsDamaged/MissingHardware/LocksLevel 3Level 3: One - entry door - does not function as it should -because of damage to the door’s hardware.The closer is not closing and latching the door - even thoughthis may be a matter of adjustment rather than damage.
  • 14. Here, on the same property, is another example. The closercloses the door to within ¼ inch of latching, but fails to latchthe door.Building ExteriorDoorsDamaged/MissingHardware/LocksLevel 3
  • 15. Damaged Surface (Holes/Paint/Rusting/Glass)• Deficiency: You see damage to the door surface that may affect either the surface protection or the strength of the door or may compromise building security.• Level 2: One door has a hole or holes with a diameter ranging from 1/4 inch to 1 inch.• Level 3: One door has a hole or holes larger than 1 inch in diameter, significant peeling/cracking/no paint, rust that affects the integrity of the door surface, or broken/missing glass. - OR -• One entry, bathroom/restroom, fire door or emergency exit door has a hole or holes with a diameter ranging from 1/4 inch to 1 inch.
  • 16. Building Exterior, Doors, Damaged Surface, Level 3 One entry, bathroom/restroom, fire door or emergency exit door has a hole or holes with a diameter ranging from 1/4 inch to 1 inch.This DOES include holes left behinddue to the removal of hardware, andeven holes manufactured into thedoor, but never used.
  • 17. Unit, Doors, Damaged Surface, Level 3 Level 3: One entry door - has a hole orholes with a diameterranging from 1/4 inch to 1 inch.Level 3: One door has a - no paint - that affects theintegrity of the door surface.
  • 18. Common Areas,Closet/Utility/Mechanical, Doors - Damaged Surface, Level 3Level 3: One door has ahole or holes larger than1 inch in diameter - thataffects the integrity ofthe door surface.
  • 19. This was once a beautiful, new steel door witha clean coat of gray primer, ready to bepainted. Having never been painted, it is nowan ugly old rusty door, and a Level 3 defect.In fact, it would have represented Level 3Surface Damage, even when it was brandnew, because the lack of paint or varnish –having “no protective finish,” – it met the Level3 criteria, which include: “no paint.”Primer is NOT paint. That’s why it is called“primer” instead of “paint.” Primer preparesor “primes” the metal door to accept paint.Protect your investment by painting new doorsimmediately when installed. Building Exterior, Doors, Damaged Surface, Level 3
  • 20. Damaged/Missing Screen/Storm/Security Door• Deficiency: You see damage to surfaces, including screens, glass, frames, hardware, and door surfaces.• Level 1: At least one screen door or storm door is damaged or is missing screens or glass—shown by an empty frame or frames.• Level 3: A security door is not functioning or missing. (A security door basically means a screen or storm door with a keyed lock.)
  • 21. This is a “security door.” They are more commonin some parts of the country, and less commonin others. Typically, a security door is an outerdoor like a storm or screen door, designed toprovide additional security as well as ventilation.For a regular screen or storm door, any damagewhat-so-ever is Level 1.When a security door “does not function” (latch,lock, close, and open normally) or is missing, thedefect becomes Level 3.NOTE: When inspecting doors, especiallysecurity doors, watch for double cylinder locks –the kind that require a key to open from inside.This probably results in a Health andSafety, Emergency/Fire Exits, Blocked/Unusabledefect, which is both considered “LifeThreatening” and is always a very high scoringissue.
  • 22. Deteriorated/Missing Caulking/Seals• Deficiency: Sealant and stripping designed to resist weather or caulking is missing or deteriorated.• Note: This applies only to entry doors that were designed with seals. If a door shows evidence that a seal was never part of its design, do not record a deficiency.• Level 3: The seal/caulking is missing on one entry door, or is so damaged that it does not function as it should. (This is often judged by daylight showing around the door.)
  • 23. Unit, Doors, Deteriorated/Missing Caulking/Seals, Level 3Level 3: The seal/caulking ismissing on one entry door, oris so damaged that it doesnot function as it should. This defect is usually cited due to visible daylight being seen around or under the door. If, upon closer inspection, the inspector finds no damage to the seal, the defect is cited under “Frames” rather than “Seals.”
  • 24. One very frequently overlooked defect when preparing for the REAC inspection is the “seals” defect at Building Exterior Entry Doors. This isespecially true in senior high rises, where wheelchairs often damage these seals, and the staff then abandons repairing them. For the typical single building high rise, this defect can have a scoring value up to 8+ points!!
  • 25. Missing Door• Deficiency: A door is missing.• Level 1: A door is missing, but it is not a bathroom/restroom, entry, or fire door.• Level 2: Two doors or up to 50% of the doors are missing, but they are not bathroom/restroom, entry, or fire doors.• Level 3: An entry, bathroom/restroom, fire, or emergency exit door is missing. (Any missing Exterior door is Level 3.) -OR-• More than 50% of the doors are missing.
  • 26. This picture shows a door frame withan outer security door installed inplace of a solid inner door. It was astrange choice, but it is the owner’sprerogative to make such designchanges.While this was an “intentional designchange,” the presence of hingemortises (the rectangular holes wherethe hinges would fit) indicates amissing door.To complete this design change andavoid a Level 3 Missing Doordefect, the owner needs to fill or coverthe mortises, to indicate the door hasbeen intentionally and permanentlyremoved by design.
  • 27. This principle is often expressed as“If you remove something, removeall evidence that it was everthere.” This would also apply tohardware changes like the removalof a self-closer or a dead bolt.In this picture, the security doorhas never had a dead boltinstalled, but the fact that there isa hole means the inspector mightcite “Damaged Surface” or“Damaged/Missing Hardware” ifthis was a regular door.* The staffshould install a blank cover plateto make it clear this is intentionaland permanent.* Since it is a security door, thiswould actually fall underScreen/Storm/Security Doorsrather than Surface or Hardware.
  • 28. In this photo, a closer is missing in addition to the rust on the door. This door hastwo defects, one for Surface damage and one for Hardware damage.It is common and perfectly legitimate for the inspector to cite two defects on thesame door, which can significantly drive down the property’s REAC score. This isespecially true when there is only one or very few buildings, and several Exteriordoor defects are cited, or when a large number of Units have repeated doordefects. For this door, the closer should have been replaced, or – if the closer was removed intentionally - the staff should have “removed all evidence” by filling the holes, sanding, and painting to make it look like a closer was never there. The door should have been painted as well, to avoid the Surface defect.
  • 29. Critical Elementsof the REAC Inspection:Exterior, Common Area, and Unit Doors Presented by The Inspection Group and REACSolutions Created and Narrated by
  • 30. Additional REAC TrainingThe Inspection Group provides:• Interactive, online training programs on demand• Live online teleconference training by appointment• Live, classroom style training at your location by contract• Speakers on the subject of REAC inspections for industry conferences, for presentations from an hour to day long workshops
  • 31. Contact us:Michael Gantt at• solutions@reacsolutions.comSaul Himelstein at• data@theinspectiongroup.com
  • 32. Visit our Web Sites atwww.theinspectiongroup.com• Information on UPCS annual inspections, REAC consulting, HQS inspections, Appeals, Training, and related topicswww.reacsolutions.com• REAC consulting for the Multi-Family and Health Care industrieswww.reacguide.com• UPCS/REAC Inspection Learning Guides and Scoring Data Publications

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