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Roy Shaff (Author) - Diversity Training In-Service
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Roy Shaff (Author) - Diversity Training In-Service

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Roy Shaff (Author) - Diversity Training In-Service

Roy Shaff (Author) - Diversity Training In-Service

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  • 1. Heritage Institute Fort Myers DIVERSITY TRAINING In-Service March 27, 2009
  • 2.
    • YOU NEED an index card and pen
    • Write a
    • One Sentence
    • Definition of:
    • DIVERSITY
    • Be Prepared
    • To SHARE
    White Board Work
  • 3.
    • Diversity is not just black-white. It’s left handed people in a right-handed world.
    • It’s tall people amongst short folk.
    • It’s people from the East coast compared to people from the Midwest.
    • At some point, we all represent diversity!
    We All Represent Diversity
  • 4. Demographics of America
    • Our diverse nation is expected to become substantially more so over next the several decades.
    • The U.S. Census Bureau projects that by 2050, populations historically termed “minorities” will make up 50% of the population.
    • The Hispanic–origin population will be the fastest growing ethnic group doubling by 2050.
    • The fastest growing racial group will Asian and Pacific Islander population. Asian American elders will increase by 300%.
  • 5. Demographics of America
    • Marked differences in education, income with a greater number of blacks and Hispanics being considered “near poor” (100-200% of poverty level). Remember that our student’s income significantly influences their access to educational opportunity, health insurance coverage, and statistically “health status”.
    • One–sixth of the U.S. population speaks a language other than English at home.
  • 6. TITLE VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964
    • “ No person in the United States shall, on ground of race, color, or national origin, be excluded from participation in, or be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any program or activity receiving Federal financial assistance."
  • 7. ADA
    • Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA): 1990
    • Public Law 101-336
    • Draws from prior laws: Title VI of the Civil Rights Act (see above) and Title V of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973
    • Guidelines from DOJ: The Americans with Disabilities Act Handbook
  • 8.  
  • 9.  
  • 10.  
  • 11.  
  • 12. Presenting Diversity Dynamics
    • Think about this. Do not answer out loud. What are the issues that surface for YOU when you think of Diversity here at Heritage Institute?
      • What do you see?
      • What would you like to see?
      • Or understand?
  • 13. Definitions
    • STEREOTYPES
    • Characterizing or labeling social or ethnic groups on the basis of preconceived, usually negative labels without regard to accuracy, individuality or humanity.
    • DISCRIMINATION
    • An individual or group's words, acts or failures to act that may violate the dignity and human or social rights of an individual or group of people.
  • 14. QUESTION FOR DIALOGUE
    • What is diversity and what should it mean
    • to us?
  • 15. QUESTION FOR DIALOGUE
    • What is your
    • perception of our
    • school climate
    • regarding diversity?
  • 16. Diversity
    • IS about understanding cultural differences
    • IS NOT about white male bashing
    • IS hearing a variety of perspectives
    • IS NOT a lesson in political correctness
    • IS you sharing your thoughts, ideas and opinions with the others
    • IS NOT a lecture about how you should think, feel or act
  • 17.  
  • 18. Cultural Competence Learning Matrix
  • 19. 2 Myths of Cultural Competence
    • Myth # 1: I have examined my preconceptions about the various cultures in and outside of my classroom, changed some of my thoughts, and now feel culturally competent to deal with people I will work with and teach.
    • Cultural competence is not a one-time, finite achievement. It is a process that is applied in every case (usually many times)
  • 20. 2 Myths of Cultural Competence
    • Myth # 2: As a person of ______ ethnicity or culture, I know what it means to be culturally sensitive. I don't need any special training on how to practice cultural competence.
    • Each person has different levels of awareness and sensitivity about his or her own and other cultures. Every human being, however, holds preconceptions about "different" cultures and must use some kind of deliberate, analytical process to examine cultural misinformation and strive for cultural competence.
  • 21. Discussion Starters on the Implications for Heritage Classrooms
    • Take an index card
    • As we talk, you will have ideas and insights we have not discussed
    • Write down your ideas
    • We will share them as a group later during this in-service
  • 22. Discussion Starters on the Implications for Heritage Classrooms
    • We must be aware of how we treat our students
    • How our students treat us
    • How our students treat each other
    • You may find that ideas we are about to discuss are more or less appropriate to your situation than others. You may also be more comfortable using some of these than using others.
  • 23. Discussion Starters on the Implications for Heritage Classrooms Include a statement in your first day of class about the need to appreciate and respect diversity. Including Heritage Institute's anti-discrimination policy shows that you are aware of it, and provides a basis for discussion or action should a relevant issue arise. Helpful? Why? Why not?
  • 24. Discussion Starters on the Implications for Heritage Classrooms Include a statement in your first day of class about the need to s et ground rules for class discussion, based on an agreement to honor each other’s differences and experiences. Acknowledge that a certain amount of conflict may be necessary for the learning process. Helpful? Why? Why not?
  • 25. Discussion Starters on the Implications for Heritage Classrooms Review the syllabus during the first day of class and highlight and discuss the impersonal, specific, concrete grading criteria for the class. Review grades with students regularly to avoid surprises and accusations of favoritism or discrimination. Helpful? Why? Why not?
  • 26. Discussion Starters on the Implications for Heritage Classrooms
    • Get to know your students during the first week of the module-class and learn to pronounce their names correctly.
    • Helpful? Why? Why not?
  • 27. Discussion Starters on the Implications for Heritage Classrooms
    • Expect international students to have different expectations regarding classroom practices and that it takes time for the students to adjust to "American style" of teaching and learning.
    • Helpful? Why? Why not?
  • 28. Discussion Starters on the Implications for Heritage Classrooms Remember that, in our classrooms, age can be a significant factor in cultural experience. Many of our older students are less technologically savvy and have fears of learning which the younger students do not have. Older students can look down upon or be impatient with the younger and vice versa. Helpful? Why? Why not?
  • 29. Discussion Starters on the Implications for Heritage Classrooms If your class includes group work, even if students choose their own team members, insist that the group composition must be as diverse as possible with regard to gender, race, age, nationality and major. Helpful? Why? Why not?
  • 30. Discussion Starters on the Implications for Heritage Classrooms Pay attention to how you address different groups of students. Do you refer to international students in the same way as you refer to other students? Do you address men and women differently? How about the married or single? Strive for as much consistency as possible in the way you address each person in the class. Helpful? Why? Why not?
  • 31. Discussion Starters on the Implications for Heritage Classrooms Monitor the questions and comments coming from the class to make sure that one group's opinions are not over-represented. If people from some groups (race, gender, nationality, major) are not volunteering information, ask for their opinion. Helpful? Why? Why not?
  • 32. Discussion Starters on the Implications for Heritage Classrooms Use a random system for asking general questions or soliciting class participation so that every student has the same chance of participating. Helpful? Why? Why not?
  • 33. Discussion Starters on the Implications for Heritage Classrooms When students are speaking to each other, monitor the discussion to make sure that students show consideration and respect. Make sure that all groups are able to participate. Intervene if a person or group of people are trying to dominate the discussion. Helpful? Why? Why not?
  • 34. Discussion Starters on the Implications for Heritage Classrooms If you use cases, choose cases which involve diverse populations, female decision makers, or decision makers with Hispanic, Asian etc. surnames. Use cases which involve multi-cultural constituencies. Helpful? Why? Why not?
  • 35. Discussion Starters on the Implications for Heritage Classrooms Do not allow students to sit in the same seat EVERY class meeting. Encourage students to sit next to people they don't know. This will encourage students to get to know their colleagues as people. Helpful? Why? Why not?
  • 36. Discussion Starters on the Implications for Heritage Classrooms Avoid identifying “spokespersons.” Don’t assume, for example, that a student who uses a wheelchair can represent the views of all Americans with disabilities. Do not assume that there is a "collective identity" minority students share. Instead, treat minority students as individuals. Helpful? Why? Why not?
  • 37. Discussion Starters on the Implications for Heritage Classrooms Invite guest speakers to your class who represent diversity in gender, race and ethnicity, even if the topic itself does not deal with multi-cultural or diversity issues. Helpful? Why? Why not?
  • 38. Discussion Starters on the Implications for Heritage Classrooms Where appropriate, use the lecture materials to show how your field has become more diverse in the past few years. Present information about the increases in men or women, minorities, international employees in the profession. Discuss how the changing population has affected the field. How is the profession adapting to a global market? Helpful? Why? Why not?
  • 39. Discussion Starters on the Implications for Heritage Classrooms If you use materials which are not written in gender neutral or gender inclusive terms (especially older cases and journal articles), point out that the norm in business has changed since the materials were printed. Use these types of materials as an opportunity to remind students that most businesses use gender inclusive/gender neutral language as a matter or course. Helpful? Why? Why not?
  • 40. Discussion Starters on the Implications for Heritage Classrooms If a student or guest speaker makes a blatantly sexist, age biased, racist, or other comment which is likely to be offensive, ask the person if s/he could re-phrase the question/comment to express the idea without offending other members of the class. Use the opportunity to inform the class that those types of statements are inappropriate in professional settings. Stress that while each person has a right to his or her opinion, offensive statements and behaviors are simply inappropriate in the workplace environment and in the classroom environment. Helpful? Why? Why not?
  • 41. Discussion Starters on the Implications for Heritage Classrooms Do not talk over a student's question or comment. Allow a student to completely finish before you respond. Some faculty jump in while quieter men or women or international students are asking a question to finish the sentence, or answer before the question is complete. In classroom discussion, insist that students also allow each other to complete a statement/question before responding. Helpful? Why? Why not?
  • 42. Discussion Starters on the Implications for Heritage Classrooms If students make group presentations, insist that every member of the team must have a speaking part. If groups work on more than one task, use a rotating leader system. Each member of the group must take a leadership role on one task, or on a major part of the task. This assures that all members of the group, regardless or gender, race, age, or ethnicity, have a chance to learn leadership and organizational skills. Helpful? Why? Why not?
  • 43. Discussion Starters on the Implications for Heritage Classrooms If your class is basically a lecture class, or if students are hesitant to ask questions, allow students to write questions at the end of class to turn in, and which can be answered during the next class meeting. Choose questions from men and women, from international students, etc.. Make sure that good and bad questions are distributed equally and fairly among gender, race and ethnic groups. Alternately, assign students to ask questions in advance and rotate through the class roster, so that every student has an equal chance to answer questions. Helpful? Why? Why not?
  • 44. Discussion Starters on the Implications for Heritage Classrooms
    • Turn in your index card
    • As time allows, we will discuss the some of the ideas and insights which we have not covered
    • Remember cultural competency is an ongoing practice. We never fully “know” or “understand” another’s culture. Think of the iceberg.
  • 45. Final Thoughts on Diversity:
    • “ Tolerance implies a respect for another person, not because he is wrong or even because he is right, but because he is human.”
    • John Cogley Commonweal
  • 46.
    • “ If we cannot now end our differences, at least we can help make the world safe for diversity.”
    • John Fitzgerald Kennedy (1917-63)
    • 35th U.S. President, Democrat
  • 47.
    • “ Diversity: the art of thinking independently together.”
    • Malcolm Stevenson Forbes (1880-1954)
    • American publisher, businessman
  • 48.
    • “ I have a dream that my four children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character.”
    • Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. (1929-68)
    • African American reverend, civil rights leader.
  • 49.
    • “ Our loyalties must transcend our race,
    • our tribe, our class, and our nation:
    • and this means we must develop
    • a world perspective.”
    • Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. (1929-68)
    • African American reverend, civil rights leader.
  • 50.
    • “ There never were, in the world, two opinions alike, no more than two hairs, or two grains; the most universal quality is diversity.”
    • Michel Eyquem de Montaigne (1533-92)
    • French essayist
  • 51.
    • “ There is nothing like returning to a place that remains unchanged to find the ways in which you yourself have altered.”
    • Nelson Mandela (b. 1918)
    • South African civil rights leader,
    • Nobel Peace Prize winner
  • 52.
    • “ The most important single ingredient
    • in the formula of success is knowing
    • how to get along with people.”
    • Theodore Roosevelt (1858-1919)
    • 26th U.S. President, Republican
  • 53.
    • “ Prejudice is the child of ignorance.”
    • William Hazlitt
  • 54.
    • “ It’s amazing what ordinary people can do if they set out without preconceived notions.”
    • Unknown
  • 55. Thank You for Your Participation

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