• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content

Loading…

Flash Player 9 (or above) is needed to view presentations.
We have detected that you do not have it on your computer. To install it, go here.

Like this presentation? Why not share!

PNPA a transformative approach to nanoengineering education

on

  • 1,036 views

A novel approach to nanotechnology and nanoengineering education, using a rubric developed by Northwestern University and NCLT. First presented at SUNY Albany in August 2010, STEMtech in November ...

A novel approach to nanotechnology and nanoengineering education, using a rubric developed by Northwestern University and NCLT. First presented at SUNY Albany in August 2010, STEMtech in November 2010, and funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) grant 0903316

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,036
Views on SlideShare
1,036
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
7
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike LicenseCC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike LicenseCC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    PNPA   a transformative approach to nanoengineering education PNPA a transformative approach to nanoengineering education Presentation Transcript

    • PNPA - a Transformative Approach for Learning and Practicing Nanoengineering Robert D. Cormia Foothill College
    • Training for Success
      • Workplace effectiveness
      • Extensible careers
      • Supporting innovation
      • Learning platform
      • PNPA - nanomaterials engineering framework
      Bill Mansfield, a technician at the New Jersey Nanotechnology Center at Bell Labs in Murray Hill, N.J., holds a reflective 8-inch MEMS (micro-electro-mechanical system) disk in a "clean" room of the nanofabrication lab at Bell Labs.
    • SRI/Boeing Study
      • What do technicians do ?
      • What do technicians know ?
      • What don’t they know how to do ?
      • Need relevant experience
      • Solve relevant problems
      Nanotechnology, Education and Workforce Development - AIAA Technical Conference 2007 Vivian T. Dang, Michael C. Richey, John H. Belk (Boeing) , Robert Cormia (Foothill College), Nora Sabelli (SRI), Sean Stevens, Denise Drane, Tom Mason and …NCLT and Northwestern University
    •  
    • Nanotechnician Competencies
      • Measurements
      • Fabrication / process
      • Modeling / simulation
      • Knowledge of nanoscale
      • Work in teams (SETM)
      Deb Newberry Dakota County Technical College – University of Minnesota
    • Nanomaterials Engineering
      • Challenging applications
        • Novel properties
        • Novel structures
        • New processes
      • New structure – property relationships
      http://tam.mech.northwestern.edu/joswald/
    • Scenario Based Instruction
      • Industry context
        • Energy
        • Medicine
        • Information storage
        • Biotechnology
        • Transportation
      • What are the problems?
      • What are the materials?
      • What are the processes?
    • Nanomaterials for Energy
      • CIGS – Copper Indium Gallium (di) Selenide
      • CZTS – Copper Zinc Tin Sulfur / Selenide
      • Carbon nanotubes
      • Graphene
      • Lithium iron phosphate
      Carbon nanotubes are proposed as a novel storage vessel and carrier for hydrogen gas
    • CIGS Solar PV Module Stack Nanoco’s advanced PV-QDs comprise a proprietary organic ‘capping agent’ or ‘ligand’, which allows for ease of printing utilizing a variety of printing techniques. Once printed, the organic capping agent is removed via heating providing an inorganic photoactive layer of the desired phase.
    • Chalcopyrite Structure
    •  
    • Ten Key Nanostructures
      • Thin film and amorphous silicon (PV) – solar energy
      • Carbon nanotubes (CNT) / carbon composite materials (aerospace & transportation)
      • Surface coatings and SAMs (Self Assembled Monolayers) Sensors and bionanotechnology
      • Nitinol™ (biomedical stents) / electropolished alloys
      • Thin film and plasma coatings (polyester film) / high performance glazing
      • Particles (coated particles) biomedicine / powder metallurgy (lithium batteries)
      • Dendrimers (nanochemistry) – biomedical drug delivery
      • Polymers and composites / nanoparticle filler - lightweight automotive and aircraft materials
      • Silicon materials Micro Electro Mechanical Systems - (MEMS), Lab-on-a-Chip (LOC), DNA microarrays
      • Ceramics and electro ceramics / fuel cells - (stationary / mobile power)
    • Nanoflowers
    • PNPA Rubric
      • Application driven process (A)
      • Properties (P)
      • Nanostructures (N)
      • Fabrication (P)
      • Characterization (N-P)
      • The ‘Nanoengineering Method’
      A Rubric for Post-Secondary Degree Programs in Nanoscience and Nanotechnology
    • PNPA Rubric as a Compass
      • As you work, as you learn, as you read:
        • What are the applications? (A)
        • What properties are needed? (P)
        • What are the (nano)structures ? (N)
        • How do you fabricate / process it? (P)
      • Use characterization tools to develop structure property relationships (N-P)
      • Fine tune process (P) to fine tune (N-P)
    • PNPA / 4-D Compass Process (P) Applications (A) Properties (P) Nano- Structure (N)
    • PNPA – Example Curriculum
      • S elf A ssembled M onolayers (SAM)
      • Surface coatings
      • Surface properties
      • Derivatized surface structure
      • SAMs structure / wetting
      • Coating process and XPS characterization
      • Correlate spectroscopy with performance
      Partner – Asemblon http://asemblon.com/
    • Deeper Learning Outcomes
      • Can PNPA help students learn better?
        • Understand / consider application needs
        • Visualize structures / properties together
        • Ask how a material is made / processed?
        • Think about methods / tools to characterize
      • Use PNPA to ‘connect’ topics in the four-course series – from A to PNPA
      • Can PNPA help technicians work better?
    • NSF Project 2009-2012
      • Develop a four course program
      • Rewrite curriculum using PNPA
      • Integrate scenario / contextual purpose
      • Develop Linked Learning Outcomes (LLO)
        • A dozen key nanostructures and themes
      • Train and test how this affects technicians
        • NanoNoteBook® Semantic Wiki course journal
        • Employer interviews – did PNPA matter?
    • Four Course Nano Program
      • NANO51 – Survey of Nanotechnology (A)
      • NANO52 – Nanostructures (N-P, N-P)
      • NANO53 – Nanocharacterization (N-P)
      • NANO54 – Nanofabrication (P, N-P)
      • Internship – practice PNPA / industry
      P = Properties N = Structures P = Processing A = Applications N-P = Structure-Properties N-P = Structure-Processing
    • Discovery
      • Needed an ‘on ramp’ to the program
        • NANO50 for high school students
        • Big picture Nanoscience concepts
      • Industry supports ‘integrated model’
        • Nanomaterials engineering method
      • Nanostructures to nanosystems
        • Understanding how networks affect properties
        • Helps foster structure => properties insights
    • NANO 50 - Nanoscience
      • High school students
      • AS degree / transfer
      • Incumbent workers
      • Displaced workers
      • Workshop: ‘Big Ideas of Nanoscale Science and Engineering’ (SRI and NCLT 2006-2008)
    • PNPA Rubric - Applied
      • In the workplace…
        • Think broadly about devices / applications
        • Visualize structures and their properties
        • Understand fabrication / processing
        • Think about characterization – constantly
      • Are structure-properties characterized?
      • Can structure-processing be improved?
      • Apply PNPA in every ‘working discussion ’
    • Program Learning Outcomes (PLOs)
    •  
    • Nanomaterials Engineering PLOs
      • For nanomaterials engineering, the overarching learning outcomes are:
        • What did you make? ( characterize structure )
        • How did you make it? ( micro-process )
        • How can you make it better? (optimize process => structure for structure => properties
        • How do make it consistently? (process variance of process => structure relationship
    • SETM – Extensible Technicians
      • We don’t train for multidimensional thinking required in a workplace
        • S cientific knowledge
        • E ngineering process
        • T echnology know-how
        • M anufacturing competencies
      • Technicians need to think from all four corners of SETM – just like PNPA (rubric)
    • SETM / 4-D Technicians Engineering (E) Technology (T) Science (S) Manufacturing (M)
    • Nanostructures to Nanosystems => PNPA-2
      • (N) nanostructure => nanosystem
      • (A) archetype ( network structure )
      • (P) process ( network interactions )
      • (P) (emergent) properties (at scale)
      PNPA-2 helps explain the emergence of properties at scale by extending a nanostructure to a nanosystem, and understanding properties as a result of extended network interactions (e.g. electrical conductivity and magnetism)
    • Graphene
    • Graphene as a Network Lattice constants m and n Delocalized pi e - bonding network pi-stacking interactions from a ‘ structure ’ to a ‘ system ’
    • Networked Carbon Structures From the network architecture, add interactions, observe emergent properties
    •  
    • Biomimicry – PNPA 2.0?
    • Summary
      • PNPA – nanoengineering method
        • Train technicians for multidimensional work
      • Four course nanoengineering program
      • PNPA - LLO with structures and context
      • Create a course notebook (Semantic Wiki)
      • Test for deep learning / working outcomes
      • Develop the ‘ extensible technician ’ SETM
    • Acknowledgements
      • George Bodner
      • Neha Choksi
      • Vivian Dang
      • Denise Drane
      • Mark Hersam
      • Gregory Light
      • Tom Mason
      • Michael Richey
      • Nora Sabelli
      • Shawn Stevens
      • Boeing Corporation
      • Evans Analytical Group
      • NASA-Ames Res. Center
      • NCLT – National Center for Learning Technologies
      • Northwestern University
      • Purdue University
      • SRI International
      • Stanford University
      • University of Michigan