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Semed arab eepr workshop policy development session intro
Semed arab eepr workshop policy development session intro
Semed arab eepr workshop policy development session intro
Semed arab eepr workshop policy development session intro
Semed arab eepr workshop policy development session intro
Semed arab eepr workshop policy development session intro
Semed arab eepr workshop policy development session intro
Semed arab eepr workshop policy development session intro
Semed arab eepr workshop policy development session intro
Semed arab eepr workshop policy development session intro
Semed arab eepr workshop policy development session intro
Semed arab eepr workshop policy development session intro
Semed arab eepr workshop policy development session intro
Semed arab eepr workshop policy development session intro
Semed arab eepr workshop policy development session intro
Semed arab eepr workshop policy development session intro
Semed arab eepr workshop policy development session intro
Semed arab eepr workshop policy development session intro
Semed arab eepr workshop policy development session intro
Semed arab eepr workshop policy development session intro
Semed arab eepr workshop policy development session intro
Semed arab eepr workshop policy development session intro
Semed arab eepr workshop policy development session intro
Semed arab eepr workshop policy development session intro
Semed arab eepr workshop policy development session intro
Semed arab eepr workshop policy development session intro
Semed arab eepr workshop policy development session intro
Semed arab eepr workshop policy development session intro
Semed arab eepr workshop policy development session intro
Semed arab eepr workshop policy development session intro
Semed arab eepr workshop policy development session intro
Semed arab eepr workshop policy development session intro
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Semed arab eepr workshop policy development session intro

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Energy Efficiency Policies for the SEMED/Arab Region Workshop. …

Energy Efficiency Policies for the SEMED/Arab Region Workshop.
15-16 April 2013. Amman,Jordan

Published in: Technology, Economy & Finance
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  1. © OECD/IEA 2010Energy Efficiency Policies for the SEMED/Arab RegionIntroduction to Policy Development Working Session16 April 2013Grayson Heffner and Sara Bryan Pasquire
  2. © OECD/IEA 2010Agenda The Big Picture The role of energy efficiency policies in overcomingbarriers to energy efficiency Organization of the policy development sessions
  3. © OECD/IEA 2010Energy demand will continue to grow –but the growth rate can be managed
  4. © OECD/IEA 2010Middle East and North African carownership will double in 20 yearsPLDV ownership in selected markets in the New Policies ScenarioStarting from a very low base, car ownership in non-OECD countries is set togrow considerably, driven by China. The extent of growth will determine futureoil demand.201020350100200300400500600700800UnitedStatesEuropeanUnionChina India MiddleEastWorldVehiclesperthousandpeople
  5. © OECD/IEA 2010Energy intensity has worsened inMiddle East and Africa regions0 0.3 0.6 0.9 1.2 1.5WorldChinaLatin AmericaMiddle EastAfricaJapanEuropean UnionUnited StatesE. Europe/Eurasia19802010toe per thousand dollars of GDP ($2011, MER)These regional trends are counter to the global trend
  6. © OECD/IEA 2010Middle East and North Africa account forabout two-thirds of total fossil-fuel subsidiesIEAWorld EnergyOutlook 2011
  7. © OECD/IEA 2010Global investment in energy efficiencySource: 2011 estimates, WEO 2012
  8. © OECD/IEA 2010
  9. © OECD/IEA 2010Total Final Energy Consumption (TFC) –across countries in SEMED (+1) regionEgypt64%Jordan6%Lebanon5%Morocco16%Tunisia9%
  10. © OECD/IEA 2010TFC by consuming sector - EgyptIndustry26%Transport26%Residential22%Commerce and publicservices3%Agriculture/forestry7%Non-specified (other)2%Non-energy use14%
  11. © OECD/IEA 2010TFC by consuming sector - TunisiaIndustry28%Transport28%Residential27%Commerce andpublic services8%Agriculture/forestry6%Non-energy use3%
  12. © OECD/IEA 2010TFC by consuming sector - JordanIndustry22%Transport38%Residential22%Commerce andpublic services8%Agriculture/forestry4%Non-specified (other)3%Non-energy use3%
  13. © OECD/IEA 2010TFC by consuming sector - MoroccoIndustry23%Transport28%Residential21%Commerce and publicservices4%Agriculture/forestry18%Non-specified (other)2%Non-energy use4%
  14. © OECD/IEA 2010TFC by consuming sector - LebanonIndustry16%Transport44%Residential26%Commerce and publicservices6%Non-specified(other)6%Non-energy use2%
  15. © OECD/IEA 2010Barriers to improved energy efficiencyBarrier ExamplesMarket failures  Energy price subsidies Agency problems, when benefits are split amongst several parties(e.g., renter-occupied housing), reducing the motivation to act Project sizeFinancial • Perceived risk• Transaction costs• Low capacity within the financial sector• Lending terms (period, interest rate, collateral requirements)Information  Lack of awareness Consumer indifferenceRegulatory andinstitutional Energy tariffs that discourage EE investment Institutional bias CompetingTechnical  Lack of affordable or suitable EE technologies Measuring savings Capacity to identifying and implementing EE projects Project performance risk
  16. © OECD/IEA 2010IEA survey of energy efficiency barriers65%46% 46% 46%38%27%23% 23% 23%19% 19%0%10%20%30%40%50%60%70%End-user awareness, low energy prices, financing, andimplementation capacity are commonly cited
  17. © OECD/IEA 2010IEA survey of energy efficiency barriers
  18. © OECD/IEA 2010Policies and interventions Information and education Advice and assistance Information and product labelling Capacity building Economic instruments Fiscal incentive Financial measures Market-based instruments Regulatory instruments Building codes & appliance standards Energy management requirements Energy savings obligations Technology development Enabling frameworks Legislation Funding Institutional arrangements Implementing agencies Public-private partnerships
  19. © OECD/IEA 2010Matching policies to barriers - examplesBarrier PolicyLimited Information Appliance labelingAwareness and education campaignsPerceived Risk Public sector procurementGuarantee facilitiesPrice or market distortion Appliance standardsTechnology and capacityshortfallsIndustry formationCreating EE delivery agenciesTransaction Costs Audit requirementsProject preparation facilitiesAccess to financing Revolving fundsPublic-private partnerships
  20. © OECD/IEA 2010Enabling frameworks and institutionalarrangementsFrameworks &ArrangementsEgypt Jordan Kuwait Lebanon Morocco TunisiaEnergy Efficiency Laws &Decrees√ √ √National Energy Strategiesand Plans√ √ √ √Apex Agency for EnergyPolicy√ √ √ √ √ √EE Specialist Agency √ √ √ √Results MonitoringCapacity√ √Capacity Programs √ √ √ √EE Regulations √ √Financial Arrangements √ √Academic & ResearchCapacity√ √ √ √ √Industrial Associations √ √ √ √ √Source: Tapping a Hidden Resource, World Bank 2009
  21. © OECD/IEA 2010Questions to consider whenformulating energy efficiency policies Will it work? How much will it cost? Who will pay? How long will it take? Will there be unintended impacts orinterference with other policies? Does the capacity exist to implement?
  22. © OECD/IEA 2010Policy Development Session
  23. © OECD/IEA 2010Form small groups organized by sector Industry Buildings Transport Cross-sectoral
  24. © OECD/IEA 2010Sequence of group discussion1. Energy efficiency improvement opportunities Discuss and agree the major energy savingsopportunities within the region Identify any major differences across countries2. Barriers to scaling-up energy efficiency Discuss and agree the major barriers in your sector Identify any major differences across countries3. Consider the policy recommendations putforward by the IEA and WEC and others Which of these are being implemented or considered? Any others that might be appropriate to the region? Which are not appropriate to the region? Why? Identify any major differences across countries
  25. © OECD/IEA 2010Sequence of group discussion (con.)4. Develop additional, regional potential policies Discuss additional policies especially applicable to theSEMED/Arab region or your country Identify any major differences across countries5. Rank-order the potential policies Work as a group to select the most important and lessimportant potential policies Were there major differences across countries? 6. Prepare to report-out your results Work with your assigned rapporteur Your presentation should cover each step of your workprocess, policy recommendations, and majordifferences across countries
  26. © OECD/IEA 2010Group Discussion ResourcesSource: Tapping a Hidden Resource, World Bank 2009
  27. © OECD/IEA 2010Consuming Sector Insights Manufacturing: 13 percent of regional GDP and 17 percent ofexports. Most energy-intensive manufacturing industries arecement, steel, fertilizers, and glass, consuming 25 percent of theenergy and contributing a significant share of GDP Buildings: Buildings are estimated to be responsible today for atleast 40 percent of energy use in the region Transport: No region of the world has a transport sector that ismore energy intensive. Measures to bring down energyintensity in the transport sector could include fuel priceincreases, demand management, greater investment in publictransport, measures to improve vehicle fuel economy, andintegrated transport and urban planning. Agriculture: Nearly half (45.7 percent) of the region’s cultivatedareas are irrigated, a fact that has huge implications for energyconsumption and water-resource management.Source: Tapping a Hidden Resource, World Bank 2009
  28. © OECD/IEA 2010Transport energy savings opportunitiesSector EfficiencymeasureBarriers PolicyrecommendationRankPassengervehiclesMotorcycles andscootersTrucks and inlandfreightAir and maritimePublictransportationRailThree transportation efficiency modalities -avoid/reduce, shift, and improve
  29. © OECD/IEA 2010Buildings and tertiary energy savingsopportunitiesSector EfficiencyMeasureBarriers PolicyrecommendationsRankStreet lightingOffice lightingHeating,ventilation and airconditioningCommercialrefrigeration,freezing, cookingSmall andmedium motorsOffice equipmentand servers
  30. © OECD/IEA 2010Industry energy savings opportunitiesSector EfficiencyMeasureBarriers PolicyrecommendationsRankEnergy intensive1Electric motorsand drivesProcess heatNon-energyintensive2SMEs1cement, glass, paper, steel, petro-chemicals, desalination2 Food processing, services, textiles, other
  31. © OECD/IEA 2010Appliances and lighting (Households)energy savings opportunitiesSector EfficiencyMeasureBarriers PolicyrecommendationsRankResidential whitegoodsResidential airconditionersTV andelectronicsHot waterheatersHeatingHouseholdLighting
  32. © OECD/IEA 2010Agricultural and water supply energysavings opportunitiesSector EfficiencyMeasureBarriers PolicyRecommendationRankIrrigationDesalination

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