Digital tools that facilitate
conversations: Understanding the
social health experience
Craig Lefebvre, PhD
Alexandra Born...
To me the ideal doctor
would be a man endowed
with profound knowledge
of life and of the soul,
intuitively divining any
su...
Connected health
continuously aggregates
personal data from multiple
stakeholders to “connect” the
patient to the optimal ...
Participatory Medicine is a
movement in which
networked patients shift
from being mere passengers
to responsible drivers o...
Digital Connections for Health &
Healthcare
Integrative and Ubiquitous Digital Health Experiences
Figure 1: Social network site use by age group, 2005-2012 (adapted from Pew Internet and
American Life Project surveys: Fe...
The Health Care Dyad and
Digital Health Experiences
7
Motivations for Participating
in Online Communities and
Social Network Sites
General Term
Entertainment
Social Enhancement...
Social Identity Theory and
Social Media Use
Component
Social Categorization
Social Identity
Social Comparison
Psychologica...
User behavior in online health
communities (OHC)s• Need for Answers. OHC membership motivated by desire to learn more abou...
Creating Social Health Experiences
• 42% use social media to
look up consumer
reviews of health
treatments or physicians;
...
Outcomes of Social Health Experiences
• Health information obtained through social
media sites would cause them to seek a
...
Reminder: The data and
discussion from this
presentation are available
at http:xxxx
13
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Digital tools that facilitate conversations: Understanding the social health experience

297 views

Published on

An approach to thinking about the social revolution in preventive health and healthcare. Offers a way to think about these changes, how they impact existing social relationships, and what can be done to move towards a social health experience for all participants.

Published in: Health & Medicine
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
297
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
4
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
3
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • This afternoon we’re going to focus on “The People” – the social aspects of digital health experiences – and how those experiences are being facilitated by digital social networks and other forms of social technologies.
  • People seem to use the internet as a resource to facilitate conversations with others, especially their health care providers. One survey by Tu (2011) found that 58% of all American adults searched for health or medical information online in the past year (among online adults that figure increases to 85%). Another survey by PwC found the average US adult seeks health information online about 3x/month.
    Tu found that about half of health searchers said the information influenced whether they asked their doctor a question or even whether t6o see a doctor (43%). About 20% said that the information influenced their decision about seeking a second opinion.
    Fox et al found that about half of online health searchers are doing it on behalf of someone else.
    Now that 2/3s of all internet users are using SNS, the role of social experiences has expanded for them; 33% are using SNS to obtain health information and share symptoms. Yet, another survey puts this figure closer to 6% for people who go to SNS to search for health information.
    HOWEVER, a survey of healthcare providers by AMN Healthcare found that while 48% are using SNS to access continuing education, share articles with colleagues and communicate with employers, only 8% are using social media to connect with patients
  • The Uses & Gratification is a social science theory that has been emerging since the 1970’s, and the theory has found new focus in light of
    telecommunications, computer-mediated-communication, and the internet. The foundations are based on understanding why people
    use a specific media and the gratification that they receive from it.
    U&G research categorizes motivations for media use by the following: diversions, social utility, personal identity, and
    surveillance. Table 1 summarizes the key motivators based on U&G that have been identified in the literature.
    Empirically Validated Motivator
    Entertainment - Diversions, Pass time, Entertainment
    Social Enhancement - Social utility, Interpersonal utility, Social enhancement
    Connectivity - Social utility, Interpersonal utility, Maintaining interpersonal connectivity
    Self-discovery - Personal identity, Self-discovery
    Get Information - Surveillance, Information seeking, Purposive value, Get Information
    Provide Information - Purposive value, Provide Information
    Convenience - convenience
    LINK: http://hct.ece.ubc.ca/publications/pdf/noreen-fels-ho-acmmm2010.pdf
  • Definition
    Categorization -The ordering of social environment in groupings of
    persons in a manner that is meaningful to the subject.
    Identity - Part of an individual’s self concept which derives from his
    knowledge of his membership of a social group(s) together with the emotional significance attached to that membership.
    Comparison - Ability to define one’s self and one’s group by measuring it
    against another group.
    Distinction - Ability to separate one’s own group from another by
    Similarities.
    Belonging - The ability for one to have greater similarities with others in
    the group.
  • Digital tools that facilitate conversations: Understanding the social health experience

    1. 1. Digital tools that facilitate conversations: Understanding the social health experience Craig Lefebvre, PhD Alexandra Bornkessel, MA 1
    2. 2. To me the ideal doctor would be a man endowed with profound knowledge of life and of the soul, intuitively divining any suffering or disorder of whatever kind, and restoring peace by his mere presence. ~Henri Amiel Providing Optimal Healthcare: The Doctor 2
    3. 3. Connected health continuously aggregates personal data from multiple stakeholders to “connect” the patient to the optimal tool or provider that can address needs immediately and in the most appropriate and cost- effective manner. ~Grameen Research Providing Optimal Healthcare: Connections 3
    4. 4. Participatory Medicine is a movement in which networked patients shift from being mere passengers to responsible drivers of their health, and in which providers encourage and value them as full partners. ~Society for Participatory Medicine Providing Optimal Healthcare: Participatory 4
    5. 5. Digital Connections for Health & Healthcare Integrative and Ubiquitous Digital Health Experiences
    6. 6. Figure 1: Social network site use by age group, 2005-2012 (adapted from Pew Internet and American Life Project surveys: February 2005, April 2009 and August 2012).
    7. 7. The Health Care Dyad and Digital Health Experiences 7
    8. 8. Motivations for Participating in Online Communities and Social Network Sites General Term Entertainment Social Enhancement Maintaining Interpersonal Connectivity Self-discovery Get Information Provide Information Convenience Source; Kamal, N., Fels, S., & Ho, K. (2010, October). Online social networks for personal informatics to promote positive health behavior. In Proceedings of second ACM SIGMM workshop on Social media (pp. 47-52). ACM.
    9. 9. Social Identity Theory and Social Media Use Component Social Categorization Social Identity Social Comparison Psychological Distinction Sense of Belonging Source; Kamal, N., Fels, S., & Ho, K. (2010, October). Online social networks for personal informatics to promote positive health behavior. In Proceedings of second ACM SIGMM workshop on Social media (pp. 47-52). ACM
    10. 10. User behavior in online health communities (OHC)s• Need for Answers. OHC membership motivated by desire to learn more about own (or loved one’s) health condition. • Stumble Across OHCs. Membership idea often planted by Web search results or self-directed research. • Cautious. Healthy skepticism of members, information. • Verify Information. Cross-check OHC info with online resources and healthcare providers. • Personal Experiences. Discussions revolve around personal experiences with medications, self-care. • Starting Point. OHC info used as starting point for health decisions. Supplements provider advice, other research. 10 Source: Rupert, et al. (2012). How do online health communities influence treatment decisions?
    11. 11. Creating Social Health Experiences • 42% use social media to look up consumer reviews of health treatments or physicians; • 25% share their own health experiences on social media websites; and • 20% belong to a health forum or online health community. PricewaterhouseCoopers. Social media “likes” healthcare: From marketing to social business. 2012.
    12. 12. Outcomes of Social Health Experiences • Health information obtained through social media sites would cause them to seek a second opinion (45%); • Influence their choice of a specific physician, hospital or medical facility (41%); • Affect how they manage a chronic condition or approach diet and exercise routines (40%); and • Be considered in their decision to take certain medications (34%). PricewaterhouseCoopers. Social media “likes” healthcare: From marketing to social business. 2012.
    13. 13. Reminder: The data and discussion from this presentation are available at http:xxxx 13

    ×