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2008: Marketing 2.0 In Action
 

2008: Marketing 2.0 In Action

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Keynote speaker 2008: Marketing 2.0 in action

Keynote speaker 2008: Marketing 2.0 in action

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    2008: Marketing 2.0 In Action 2008: Marketing 2.0 In Action Presentation Transcript

    • About Bell Bell is Canada's largest communications company, providing consumers with solutions to all their communications needs, including telephone services, wireless communications, high- speed Internet, digital television and voice over IP. Bell also offers integrated information and communications technology (ICT) services to businesses and governments, and is the Virtual Chief Information Officer (VCIO) to small and medium businesses (SMBs). Bell is proud to be a Premier National Partner and the exclusive Telecommunications Partner to the Vancouver 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games. Bell is wholly owned by BCE Inc. For information on Bell's products and services, please visit www.bell.ca. For corporate information on BCE, please visit www.bce.ca.
    • Marketing 2.0 in action Rajat Chopra Marketing 2.0 and Beyond 2008 09 18
    • Blogs I Read Grokdotcom Seth’s Blog Blogging Me Blogging you Brand Autopsy Copy Blogger Six pixels of separation About me Rajat Chopra is an interactive and multichannel e- Reference Books marketer for bell.ca, Bell Canada’s consumer website. With over eight years of experience in the interactive industry, Rajat has been driving e- • The New Influencers business projects and strategies in various roles: online marketing, client strategy, program management, system architecture and project • Now Is Gone management. Very recently, he assumed a critical role in the • Marketing to the Social Web launch of the new Bell brand by leading the implementation of the brand on bell.ca. Rajat has intimate knowledge of business processes, from IT to marketing, and has evolved Research Studies from information technologist to business technologist. He earned an Executive Masters in Project Management from Schulich School of • Forrester Research Canada Business (York University), a Bachelor of Commerce and an advanced diploma in computer • Bell Canada applications.
    • “My favourite band is Linkin Park and they also like Starbucks and that’s how I heard about their coffee. The reason I added Starbucks is because I like their coffee and I enjoy drinking it.” “I joined the Jeep group because I own a Jeep and, well, Jeep owners are a very select group of people. By that I mean that Why users engage Jeep owners, especially Wrangler owners, with brand? all share a common bond and that is why we wave to each other when we pass each other on the road.” “I know it must seem really weird to friend a brand, like I did with Aquafina. I did because I drink Aquafina, and when I saw they had a MySpace page I just thought it would be fun to friend request them . . . it’s more of a way to list some of your favourite things.” Page 5 | 2008 09 18 | CONFIDENTIAL
    • Creating curosity… “er”
    • Bell-ements
    • The word is out… • Business-to-business (B2B) marketers struggle to integrate online and traditional marketing tactics and make them payoff in plump pipelines and brightened brands. • Today’s Marketers’ must abandon time-worn broadcasting and adopt community-focused marketing. • Community marketing replaces traditional offer- response strategies with communications that foster dialogue; embrace community issues and values; and position brands, vendor experts, and products as valuable community resources. Source: Forrester Research, Inc. Page 9 | 2009 09 18 | CONFIDENTIAL
    • New technology marketing discipline • Technology marketers’ traditional demand generation and customer conversion playbook is a passé. • Business Technologists (BT’s) are concerned with adoption of business capabilities as their objective, not product selection. These users use Web 2.0 technologies to advance adoption goals. • Community marketing, which encompasses an attitudinal, procedural, and technological overhaul of technology marketing practices, is the new discipline for matching buyers’ business needs with technology vendor capabilities. Page 10 | 2009 09 18 | CONFIDENTIAL
    • Agenda 1. Introduction: • Some facts • Buzzwords 2. How to successfully build a community marketing strategy. 3. The value social computing tools/online communities can add to your organization. 4. Incorporating the latest trends in the social computing and online space and planning for the future. 5. Issues around social computing and its business value. Page 11 | 2008 09 18 | CONFIDENTIAL
    • The Internet is changing. So what? • 60% of Internet traffic is user generated content. • Facebook is the #2 most visited Website in Canada. • 1 in 4 Canadians are on Facebook. • 110 million blogs exist today. • 75,000 new blogs created each day. • 2 million Wikipedia articles. Doubled since 2006. • 78.3 million YouTube videos as of January 2008. Page 12 | 2008 09 18 | CONFIDENTIAL
    • The Internet is changing. So what? Web 2.0 Social Media Social Computing Participative Web Social Networking Wikis Tagging Social Graph RSS Social Bookmarking Interactive Web Enterprise 2.0 Page 13 | 2008 09 18 | CONFIDENTIAL
    • Ignore the hype but not the opportunity Social Media • Functionality that allows anyone to easily create, share and publish content. • Examples: Blogs, Wiki, Facebook, YouTube Web 2.0 Web 1.0 • Social Media on Internet (public) – Public Media • Dynamic – Static • Participative – Consultation • Info generated by users – Info generated by webmaster • Collaborative – Informative Enterprise 2.0 (E2.0) • Social media used within an organization (behind firewall) • Business focus and business value: communication, collaboration, engagement • Rules, policies, process • Governance and moderation • Not Web 2.0! Page 14 | 2008 09 18 | CONFIDENTIAL
    • Agenda 1. Introduction: • Some facts • Buzzwords 2. How to successfully build a community marketing strategy: • The marketing funnel • Rethinking marketing • Marketing strategy • Areas to watch out for 3. The value social computing tools/online communities can add to your organization. 4. Incorporating the latest trends in the social computing and online space and planning for the future. 5. Issues around social computing and its business value. Page 15 | 2008 09 18 | CONFIDENTIAL
    • How to successfully build a community marketing strategy Forrester defines community marketing as: The application of marketing processes and resources to assimilate a supplier into customers’ adoption networks and activities in order to support better business outcomes. Source: Forrester Research, Inc. Page 16 | 2008 09 18 | CONFIDENTIAL
    • The marketing funnel • Executive seminars Marketers doing • Trade shows • Telemarketing marketing • TV/Radio ads • National Do Not Call registry • Email filtering People blocking • Spam acts marketing • Sirius Satellite Radio • Google People don’t need • Facebook marketing • Linked in • You Tube Page 17 | 2009 09 18 | CONFIDENTIAL
    • Rethinking marketing Interruption marketing Permission marketing • Direct mail • SEO / SEM • Telemarketing • Blogging • Email blasts • RSS • Print ads • Social Media • TV/radio ads • Viral videos • Trade Shows • Free tools/trials Community marketing is Permission marketing Page 18 | 2008 09 18 | CONFIDENTIAL
    • The ask… Usually is: • How to implement marketing 2.0 technologies? • Which technologies to use? Should be: • Who you’re trying to reach? • What you’re trying to accomplish? • How you plan to change your relationships with your customers? • And then, and only then, can you decide what technologies to use! Community marketing and social applications are about connecting with customers. Page 19 | 2008 09 18 | CONFIDENTIAL
    • Creating community marketing strategy – The How? 4 steps to social strategy formation - POST 1. People 2. Objectives 3. Strategy 4. Technology Source: Forrester Research, Inc. Page 20 | 2008 09 18 | CONFIDENTIAL
    • Creating community marketing strategy – People What’s possible? • Are customers socially active online? • Would customers accept Critics activities like reviews? • Are customers Collectors? • Are customers an above average Creator and Joiner? Community marketing success depends on analyzing customers and their social tendencies Page 21 | 2008 09 18 | CONFIDENTIAL
    • Tap into brains None Strong Ties: Potential Ties: People we know Someone know the Potential well (family, friends, answer! (someone in colleagues, etc) Weak your extended family, someone in your city, someone in the Strong company, etc) Weak Ties: Ties People that we interact with once None Ties: in a while Total Stranger (neighbour, friend of a friend, someone in other dept., etc) Source: Bell Canada Collaboration Group Page 22 | 2008 09 18 | CONFIDENTIAL
    • Creating community marketing strategy – Objective What you want to accomplish? Research: Typically involves private communities or brand Monitoring. Marketing: Extend the brand through social marketing activities. Sales: Word of mouth, ratings and reviews to influence potential customers. Support: Let customers support themselves. Development: Integrate customers opinions into product development lifecycle. Source: Forrester Research, Inc. Page 23 | 2008 09 18 | CONFIDENTIAL
    • Creating community marketing strategy – Strategy How to accomplish? Describe the new Extend relationship by giving its loyal customers grounds to discuss their relationship. experiences – motivating others to buy. Measure the impact Implement metrics tactics to measure of the change progress towards the objectives. Identify barriers to Get executive buy-in to support the strategy customers influence in buying decisions. Long-term strategy = Focus on relationships Page 24 | 2008 09 18 | CONFIDENTIAL
    • Creating community marketing strategy – Technology Which technologies to use? Ratings and reviews • Encourage customers to post their evaluations. Ex: CNet, edmunds.com, cellphones.ca • Leads to increase in sales. • Overall positive impact on brand. UGC – User- • Upload pictures and videos. generated content • Connect with friends, relatives – grow Ex: MySpace, Facebook, the network. YouTube, LinkedIn • Promotes trust – word of mouth marketing. List making • Assembling collections of user lists. Ex: amazon.com • Encourages cross-sell and upsell Page 25 | 2008 09 18 | CONFIDENTIAL
    • Areas to watch out for in POST process Anticipate failure points How to avoid it? Areas Profile mismatches ? Build strategies ill –suited to customers preferences. ? Focus on what customers' want instead of what you think is “cool” ? Example: blogging site for retirement savings plans Lack of defined ? Most common source of failure. objectives ? Waste of time if the goal is not clearly defined. Strategic timidity ? Lack of letting go of control. ? Unwillingness to assess and address the way social technologies change customer relationships. ? Example: Lack of buy-in from top level executives can lead you to fall in this strategic mousetrap. Flawed technology ? Square peg in round hole. implementation ? Select technology partner specializing in the tool you want to implement. ? Measure tool as you go along. Page 26 | 2008 09 18 | CONFIDENTIAL
    • Agenda 1. Introduction: • Some facts • Buzzwords 2. How to successfully build a community marketing strategy. • The marketing funnel • Rethinking marketing • Marketing strategy • Areas to watch out for 3. The value social computing tools/online communities can add to your organization. 4. Incorporating the latest trends in the social computing and online space and planning for the future. 5. Issues around social computing and its business value. Page 27 | 2008 09 18 | CONFIDENTIAL
    • The value social computing tools/online communities can add to your organization. Page 28 | 2008 09 18 | CONFIDENTIAL
    • The power of Social media Page 29 | 2008 09 18 | CONFIDENTIAL
    • Have you started embracing social tools and technologies? Page 30 | 2008 09 18 | CONFIDENTIAL
    • The value social computing tools/online communities can add to your organization. Blogs Social networking Rich Internet applications 1. Content creation and publishing. Wikis RSS 2. Team coordination Widget 3. Proactive information delivery Podcasting Mashups 4. Information location Online Communities 5. Communities of interest Facebook YouTube LinkedIn Page 31 | 2008 09 18 | CONFIDENTIAL
    • How Additional Brand Value Is Created On Social Networking Sites – Never ending Friending (1) User visits a branded profile (e.g., http://www.myspace.com/adidasso ccer). (2) User sees a wallpaper download in the brand’s community. (3) User passes the wallpaper along to a friend who might be interested. (4) User puts the wallpaper on profile page. (5) Other users see the wallpaper on the profile page. (6) They either use it themselves (4) or pass it along, as well (3). Source: “Never Ending Friending: A Journey Into Social Networking,” MySpace, Isobar and Carat, April 2007 Page 32 | 2008 09 18 | CONFIDENTIAL
    • Agenda 1. Introduction: • Some facts • Buzzwords 2. How to successfully build a community marketing strategy. • The marketing funnel • Rethinking marketing • Marketing strategy • Areas to watch out for 3. The value social computing tools/online communities can add to your organization. 4. Incorporating the latest trends in the social computing and online space and planning for the future. 5. Issues around social computing and its business value. Page 33 | 2008 09 18 | CONFIDENTIAL
    • Incorporating the latest trends in the social computing and online space and planning for the future. Page 34 | 2008 09 18 | CONFIDENTIAL
    • Australia vs US tends Community marketing should be part of online strategy Page 35 | 2008 09 18 | CONFIDENTIAL
    • Move up from core/popular to advanced web 2.0 tactics Microsites Click 2 call Rich media Tagging Podcasting Viral Marketing Weblogs Web widgets RSS Mash-ups Wikis Virtual worlds Social Networks Advergaming Page 36 | 2008 09 18 | CONFIDENTIAL
    • Latest trends vis-à-vis your choice of technology Listening tools: Talking tools: • Private communities • Blogs • Brand monitoring • Social Networks • Videos Supporting tools: Energizing tools: • Forums • Ratings and reviews • Wikis • Ambassador programs • Web widgets Embracing tools: • Idea communities • Suggestion boxes Refer slide# 20 Page 37 | 2008 09 18 | CONFIDENTIAL
    • Few examples of Enterprise social tactics adopted at Bell Canada Page 38 | 2008 09 18 | CONFIDENTIAL
    • Case Study: social video sharing Event Details • 2 week event pilot • 3000 employees visits • 100 videos created • 15,000+ views of videos • Sharing stories of why Bell is a great place to work Business Value • Trusted messaging • Job satisfaction • Confidence in company • Employee engagement • A culture of conversation • Work is fun! A Talking communication tool to build trust and collaboration Source: Bell Canada Collaboration Group Page 39 | 2008 09 18 | CONFIDENTIAL
    • Wikis A Supporting tool to support internal employees Source: Bell Canada Collaboration Group Page 40 | 2008 09 18 | CONFIDENTIAL
    • Just Ask: Simple but Powerful Q & A (PILOT ONLY) …provides employees with a fast & simple way to get answers to their business questions by tapping into the brains of the entire company. A question-answer based Supporting tool Source: Bell Canada Collaboration Group Page 41 | 2008 09 18 | CONFIDENTIAL
    • ID-ah! tm Traditional approaches • Suggestion box, shop floor visits • Innovation councils, focus groups • Empowerment Screenshot here Traditional limitations • Non-collaborative, black box • Volume and prioritization • Lack of momentum, slow • Area of influence ID-ahtm benefits • Collaborative • Self-governing, “trustparent” • Snowball • Real-time • Open A social computing-based Embracing tool for Bell Canada Source: Bell Canada Collaboration Group Page 42 | 2008 09 18 | CONFIDENTIAL
    • Agenda 1. Introduction: • Some facts • Buzzwords 2. How to successfully build a community marketing strategy. • The marketing funnel • Rethinking marketing • Marketing strategy • Areas to watch out for 3. The value social computing tools/online communities can add to your organization. 4. Incorporating the latest trends in the social computing and online space and planning for the future. 5. Issues around social computing and its business value. Page 43 | 2008 09 18 | CONFIDENTIAL
    • Issues around social computing and its business value. Page 44 | 2008 09 18 | CONFIDENTIAL
    • Social computing – next big thing or a threat? • Unsanctioned use of social tools is significant and growing. • Embrace the usage of these tools or curb it? • How much investment should be done? • What are inherent risks? A recent study by Forrester indicates that organizations with no plans to invest in Web 2.0 already estimate usage rates among employees in the 3% to 8% range Source: Forrester Research, Inc.; June 2007 US Web 2.0 Online Survey Page 45 | 2008 09 18 | CONFIDENTIAL
    • Specific issues… Information Policy compliance Security reliability ?Organization’s valuable ?Content posted without ? Usage of public intellectual capital. organization specific sources of data from approval flows. Wikis as verified truth ?Highly confidential or for business decisions, ?Privacy data unleashed high-value proprietary product development material posted into an to the public. and quality assurance. unsecured hosted environment. So… So… So… Use public sources of Follow policies for Perform appropriate data as one of the approving, posting, diligence into each many sources of input managing, and retaining but not as decision hosted tool. certain types of content. making criteria. Page 46 | 2008 09 18 | CONFIDENTIAL
    • 3 major impediments to mass market adoption Enterprise Web 2.0 lacks a measurable value proposition. Top-line revenue or bottom-line profit growth? Managers have concerns about Web 2.0 disruptions Unreliable facts, irrelevant gossips, unwanted noise? Many firms pursue a “search and destroy” strategy. A nuisance, serious risk to intellectual property security, computing security, and enterprise compliance strategies! Source: Forrester Research, Inc Page 47 | 2008 09 18 | CONFIDENTIAL
    • To conclude Embrace Community marketing, but on your own terms Information and knowledge managers must move Web 2.0 policies and usage guidelines to the top of their priorities. It’s critical to address Web 2.0 now, before usage explodes within your organization. • If Web 2.0 technology is already being used in your organization and providing value, you must establish a strategy that allows people to use the tools they find helpful but also governs usage from a risk, compliance, and policy perspective. • If Web 2.0 tools are not yet prevalent, that reality is likely to change very soon as more workers bring their favourite tools into a business setting. Source: Forrester Research, Inc. Page 48 | 2008 09 18 | CONFIDENTIAL
    • Thank You Rajat Chopra rajat.chopra@bell.ca Page 49 | 2008 09 18 | CONFIDENTIAL