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Session with foreign language teachers in Italy covering European Schoolnet, STEPS results and ICT for language teaching.

Session with foreign language teachers in Italy covering European Schoolnet, STEPS results and ICT for language teaching.

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  • 65,000 schools 12 000 projects 100 00 teachers eTwinning 2.0
  • Teacher survey on ICT in schools: Learnind data from 18,000 interviews Research knowledge base: 60 research studies and reports reviewed by Correspondents in 22 countries Policy knowledge base: completed by 30 National Correspondents School survey of good practice: 255 respondents, every country represented Case studies: 25 structured visits, 13 countries represented. Evidence for the study came from five sources and analysed in five reports: Reviews of 60 studies (up to 4 per country plus studies covering more than one country) identified and reviewed by National Correspondents (nominated by ministries of education) in 22 countries. This is the most detailed picture ever taken in terms of EU coverage on what kind of research is carried out on the impact of ICT in primary education and the results of that research Data from interviews with a representative sample of over 18 000 primary school teachers and head teachers Responses to a survey of policy-makers in 30 countries on ICT interventions and strategies in their country Responses to a school survey of good practices completed by teachers Case studies based on visits by experts to 25 schools exemplifying the impact of strategies, including lesson observation and interviews with teachers and pupils.
  • Teachers positive about the impact of ICT on learners and learning Skills and competence development are supported with ICT: - Communication - Language (first and second) - Mathematics - Science - Digital - Social and cognitive skills ICT helps children understand better the subject they are studying ICT improves schools’ ability to cater for individual needs However, learners may not have the necessary basic computer skills There is a discrepancy between children’s home and school ICT use. Overall, there is a broad consensus among primary teachers about the positive impact of ICT on learners and learning. Research shows that a range of skills and competencies are acquired by the use of ICT: digital, communication, language (first and second), social and cognitive skills. Teachers interviewed in the LearnInd survey note a positive impact on basic skill acquisition (reading, writing, calculation) through the use of ICT and research echoes this finding. UK research shows that English, maths and science test scores improve with ICT. Many case studies highlight how ICT helps children understand the subject they are studying and caters for individual needs, although schools find it hard to isolate ICT’s contribution to test scores. However, research suggests pupils may not have the necessary basic computer skills and there is a discrepancy between children’s home and school ICT use.
  • 87% of teachers say that pupils are more motivated and attentive with ICT Positive impact on students´ motivation, attitudes and engagement Guided, active and enquiry-based tasks with ICT are motivating Learners participate more actively in learning when ICT is used ICT impacts on group processes and collaborative learning ICT is a means to overcome low motivation, social diversity and disengagement ICT improves links between learning inside and outside school and involves parents. 87% of teachers say that pupils are more motivated and attentive with ICT according to the LearnInd data. Much of the research suggests that ICT has a positive impact on students´ motivation, attitudes and engagement, in particular that guided, active and enquiry-based tasks with ICT are motivating. A large scale comparative study shows that pupils participate more actively in learning when ICT is used. Teachers in the school survey strongly felt that ICT is a means to overcome low motivation, social diversity and disengagement. In the case studies there are examples of schools using ICT to improve links between learning inside and outside school and to involve parents, and ICT impacting on group processes and collaborative learning.
  • ICT-based assessment systems give more sophisticated feedback to teacher, parent and pupil on performance Virtual learning environments allow for individual tracking of progress and help identify the next ‘learning step’, enabling pupils themselves to detect errors and shortcoming. Achievement can be recorded in e-portfolios. ICT-based assessment systems used in some case study schools give more sophisticated feedback to teacher, parent and pupil on their performance, e.g. through the analysis of test scores. Virtual learning environments allow for individual tracking of progress and help identify the next ‘learning step’, enabling pupils themselves to detect errors and shortcomings. Achievement can be recorded in e-portfolios.
  • 75% of teachers use computers in class Range of learning and teaching styles supported Rich constructivist learning environments improve learning outcomes Teachers in some countries are more optimistic about ICT than others A significant minority (21%) consider that using computers in class does not have significant learning benefits There is little to no correlation between impact optimism and level of equipment or sophistication of use, and even teacher skills. 75% of primary teachers (and their pupils) use computers in class according to the LearnInd data: from around 90% in the Nordic countries to approximately 35% in Greece, Latvia and Hungary. Teachers find that ICT supports in equal measure a range of learning and teaching styles, whether didactic or constructivist, in passive activities (exercises, practice) or in more active learning (self directed learning, collaborative work). The research shows that rich constructivist learning environments improve learning outcomes, especially for learners from disadvantaged areas. Teachers in some countries (United Kingdom, Cyprus, the Netherlands, Portugal and Poland) are more optimistic about ICT than others (Sweden, France and Austria). Nevertheless a significant minority (21%) consider that using computers in class does not have significant learning benefits. There is little to no correlation between impact optimism and level of school equipment or sophistication of use, and even teacher skills. There is a cluster of countries with high skills levels and high expectations as to ICT impact: the United Kingdom, the Netherlands, Cyprus and Malta. Only some relationship between teacher’s ICT skills and optimistic impact expectations Correlation between skepticism re ICT benefits and the motivation to ICT us in class and The older the teachers, the more likely they will lack motivation to ICT use in class.
  • Teachers use ICT more for administration, organisation and planning, according to some studies Teachers are aware of the potential benefits of ICT for students, but lack the pedagogical vision to integrate ICT in teaching ICT can promote new pedagogical approaches, but only if integrated into subject lessons. Despite the high level of reported classroom use (above), teachers use ICT more for administration, organisation and planning, according to some studies. They also show that teachers are aware of the potential benefits of ICT for students, have a positive perception of ICT in terms of supporting active autonomous learning and creating authentic tasks but lack the pedagogical vision to integrate ICT effectively in teaching. The research shows that ICT can promote new pedagogical approaches, but only if ICT is fully integrated into subject lessons. In the Nordic countries teachers in primary schools more often regard ICT as supporting their pedagogy than teachers in secondary school.
  • Teachers consider that using ICT improves their motivation and teaching skills All 30 countries are investing in developing teachers’ ICT skills New teachers may have little training in using ICT in teaching in some countries Teachers adopt technology more easily step by step with minimal disruption On-site preferable to off-site training. There are some worrying findings: Failure to acquire sufficient ICT skills No gains in pupils’ learning Courses lack the practical dimension No technical and pedagogical support. Teachers responding to the good practice survey consider that using ICT improves their motivation and teaching skills. We know from the policy survey that the 30 countries are investing in developing teachers’ ICT skills but that teachers entering the profession may have little formal training in using ICT in teaching in a significant number of countries. Research has some worrying conclusions about the effectiveness of continuing professional development in ICT: that teachers have failed to acquire the desired level of ICT skills for classroom instruction and that training has not translated into gains in pupils’ learning. Research suggests that teachers adapt new technologies more easily in a step by step process with minimal disruption, and that on-site training is preferable to off-site training. Training courses fail to match needs and lack the pedagogical and practical dimension, according to the analysis of responses to the policy survey.
  • Almost all primary schools use computers: - At least 88% in each country have internet access - On average eight internet computers per 100 learners - 8 countries have more than 14 computers per 100 learners - 72% of the study’s 209,866 primary schools have broadband internet - In 20 countries over two-thirds of primary schools have broadband. However, large variations in ICT infrastructure across and within countries: - From 3.1 to 32 computers per 100 pupils - Smaller primary schools are disadvantaged. Interactive whiteboard provision ranges from very few to all schools. Analysis of the 2006 LearnInd data reveals that almost all primary schools use computers, at least 88% in each country having internet access and with on average eight internet computers per 100 pupils. However, there are huge variations in ICT infrastructure and connectivity across and within countries. The computer to pupil ratio ranges from Luxembourg (23 computers per 100 pupils), Denmark and Norway (18), the United Kingdom (16) and the Netherlands (15) to lower figures in Latvia, Lithuania and Poland (6) and Greece and Slovakia (5). According to figures provided for the policy report the computer to pupil ratio now ranges from 3.1 to 32 per 100 pupils and that eight countries have more than 14 computers per 100 pupils (representing over 50 000 schools). 72% of the study’s 209,866 primary schools have broadband internet access and in 20 countries over two-thirds of primary schools have broadband. Interactive whiteboard provision ranges from very few (e.g. Finland, Norway) to near saturation (UK, where all primary schools have at least one). Denmark, Estonia and Norway have the highest levels of virtual learning environment use offering access from outside school. Smaller primary schools are disadvantaged in terms of equipment according to research, yet case studies show the benefits for schools in small communities are considerable.
  • Thirteen recommendations are made for actions at four levels: EDUCATION POLICY Increase, improve and diversify teacher education and support Build ICT into general educational policies Focus policies on teaching and learning – a comprehensive vision Leave room for initiative, especially in assessment Ensure effective and equal access to quality equipment and digital learning resources SCHOOLS Emphasise pedagogy, not ICT Capitalise on learners’ ICT competence and exploit the reach of technology to families Invest in school leaders’ training to lead change Develop roles and responsibilities for ICT and pedagogical support RESEARCH Complement the current picture by exploiting other methods and topics, e.g. test beds, ethnographic and long term studies to look at subject specific ICT impact and the evaluation of learning processes and outcomes Establish a long term and continuous monitoring system on the impact of ICT in schools based on quantitative and qualitative indicators, and more exchanges between schools to review and asses e-maturity EUROPEAN CO-OPERATION Provide a toolkit for indicator use by schools and policy-makers Improve the flow of knowledge of what works between countries, in particular relating to new tools and technologies, e.g. netbooks for children and deprived families, social networking, use of interactive whiteboards and learning platforms.
  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dAckkQxMadA
  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M9HF8YwmL34
  • http://joedale.typepad.com/integrating_ict_into_the_/2009/09/using-wordle-in-the-classroom.html
  • marinomarina2@gmail.com of Livorno From franpanzica@tin.it Francesca Panzica

Transcript

  • 1. Languages, technology and learning: European developments Roger Blamire European Schoolnet Udine December 2009
  • 2. 1: European Schoolnet is for schools
    • School collaboration
      • e.g. eTwinning
    • Teaching materials
      • e.g. The Learning Resource Exchange
    • Projects and competitions
      • e.g. Xplora
    • Internet safety guidance
      • e.g. Insafe
    • ICT evidence and good practice
      • e.g. STEPS
  • 3. 2: STEPS: Study of the impact of technology in primary schools
    • Approach
    • Results
    • Impact on learners, teachers, schools
    • Recommendations
  • 4. Approach and Methodology : Multiple perspectives Birmingham UK Teacher survey: 18,000 interviews 60 research studies, 22 countries Policy survey: 30 Correspondents School survey: 255 respondents 25 case studies, 13 countries
  • 5. Impact on learners /1: Knowledge, skills and competences
    • Skills and competences developed
    • Subject understanding is enhanced
    • Provision for individual needs improved
    • Learners may lack basic computer skills
    • Discrepancy between home and school ICT
    Romania: maths
  • 6. Impact on learners /2 : Motivation, confidence and engagement in learning
    • Higher levels of motivation and
      • attention, say 87% of teachers
    • More active participation
    • Low motivation, social division
      • and disengagement overcome
    • Collaborative learning supported
    • Guided, enquiry-based tasks work
    • Learning outside school supported
    • Parental engagement improved
    Italy: Twinning with Bucharest
  • 7. Impact on learners /3: Sophisticated and individualised assessment
    • Sophisticated feedback on performance
    • Value of virtual learning environments
    • Achievement recorded in e-portfolios
    Estonia: e-diary
  • 8. Impact on teachers /1: Teachers use ICT and are ‘ICT-optimistic’
    • Three in four teachers use ICT
    • Range of pedagogies supported
    • Constructivist learning
    • environments leverage ICT value
    • Teachers in some countries are
    • more ICT-optimistic than in others
    • There is a sceptical 21%
    • Low correlation between levels of
      • equipment, use and skills
      • and ICT-optimism
  • 9. Impact on teachers /2: ICT is pedagogically under-used
    • Lack of pedagogical vision
    • New pedagogical approaches
    • only if integrated into subjects
    • Use for administration,
      • organisation and planning
    Finland: collaborative learning
  • 10. Impact on teachers /3: Motivation and digital and pedagogical skills Spain: on-site training
    • Motivation and teaching
      • skills improved
    • Ideal = step by step, on-site
      • training, minimal disruption
    • Little ICT training for new teachers
    • Courses lack practical dimension
    • Little technical / pedagogical support
  • 11. Impact on schools /1: Children’s access to technology is improving
    • Almost all primary schools use computers
    • Large variation in infrastructure across and within countries
    • IWB provision ranges from very few to all schools
    - 88+% in each country have internet access - 8 internet computers per 100 learners - 8 countries have more than 14 computers per 100 learners - 72% of the primary schools have broadband internet - In 2/3 of countries over 2/3 of schools have broadband - Ten-fold range: 3.1 to 32 computers per 100 pupils - Smaller primary schools are disadvantaged
  • 12. How does Italy compare?
  • 13. Recommendations
    • Increase, improve
    • and diversify teacher
    • education and support
    • Build ICT into
    • general educational
    • policies
    • Focus on a vision
    • for learning
    • Allow for initiative
    • in assessment
    • Ensure access to
    • quality equipment and
    • learning resources
    • Emphasise
    • pedagogy not ICT
    • Capitalise on
    • learners’ ICT
    • competence and
    • exploit the reach of
    • technology to families
    • Invest in school
    • leaders’ training
    • to lead change
    • Develop roles and
    • responsibilities for ICT
    • ICT and pedagogical
    • support
    • Complement the
    • current picture by
    • exploiting other
    • methods and topics
    • Establish a long
    • term and continuous
    • monitoring system
    • on the impact of ICT
    • in schools
    • Provide a toolkit for
    • indicator use by
    • schools and
    • policy-makers
    • Improve the flow of
    • knowledge of what
    • works between
    • countries.
    EDUCATION POLICY SCHOOLS RESEARCH EU COOPERATION
  • 14. 3: Language teaching with technology
    • Resources used by language teachers
    • Examples of practice
  • 15. YouTube: Using Google maps
  • 16. Teachers’ TV: Using Moodle
  • 17. Blogs: Using Wordle
  • 18. Yahoo groups: Sharing resources
  • 19. eTwinning: i-voix
  • 20. eTwinning: L’albatros
  • 21. Teachers - the key to effective learning