Page 1 of 9RBG Communiversity
Page 2 of 9Get Up And Go!Please clear the way and let me pass,If you intend to give up here:It seems a shame that you shou...
Page 3 of 9Music In My SoulTheres music in my soul today,A joy of heart not there before:This state of conscience I relayT...
Page 4 of 9The Black MotherWhere can I find love that never changesSmiles that are true and always just the same,Caring no...
Page 5 of 9Have Faith In SelfToday I made myself in life anew,By going to that royal fount of truth,And searching for the ...
Page 6 of 9The Rise Of The NegroTo rise and demonstrate en masseIs way to make the oppressor think,And so the Negro in his...
Page 7 of 9Some BiographyBorn in St. Anns Bay, Jamaica, on August 17, 1887, MarcusGarvey was the youngest of 11 children. ...
Page 8 of 9Branches also existed in places such as Panama, Costa Rica,Ecuador, Venezuela, Ghana, Sierra Leone, Liberia, Na...
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“WRITTEN POETRY” By The Honorable Marcus Mosiah Garvey... and More

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“WRITTEN POETRY” By The Honorable Marcus Mosiah Garvey... and More

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  • WE AS RBGz ARE WALKING IN THE FOOTSTEPS OF MARCUS GARVEY...IN PURSUIT OF REPRODUCING THE BEST OF HIS MANY GREAT CONTRIBUTIONS TO OUR NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND PAN-AFRIKAN SPIRIT.
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“WRITTEN POETRY” By The Honorable Marcus Mosiah Garvey... and More

  1. 1. Page 1 of 9RBG Communiversity
  2. 2. Page 2 of 9Get Up And Go!Please clear the way and let me pass,If you intend to give up here:It seems a shame that you should yieldYour life without its fullest share.You are a coward for your pains,To come this way, and then blow out:Real men are made of stuff to last,Which they, themselves, would never doubt.Get up! You broken bits of flesh!Take courage and go fighting on;For every black man theres a day,Which pride in race has well begun.Written by Marcus Garvey (1887-1940)
  3. 3. Page 3 of 9Music In My SoulTheres music in my soul today,A joy of heart not there before:This state of conscience I relayTo rich and proud and meek and poor.Theres music in my happy Soul:From Heavens realm doth truly flowThis music in my happy Soul,My conscience tells me riglitly so.My song of joy I sing to you:Let peace and love forever beAmong ye men of every hue,Of every land and charted sea.I crave no other fortune great,But joy to live in peace with God;My hopes are fixed on His Estate,In faith so true as prophets had.This music in my soul todayI spread in truth with love unfurled;On waves of cheer it goes, I pray,To reach around the belted world.Written by Marcus Garvey (1887-1940)
  4. 4. Page 4 of 9The Black MotherWhere can I find love that never changesSmiles that are true and always just the same,Caring not how the fierce tempest rages,Willing ever to shield my honored name?This I find at home, only with Mother,Who cares for me with patient tenderness;She from every human pain would ratherSave me, and drink the dregs of bitterness.If on lifes way I happen to flounder,My true thoughts should be of Mother dear,She is the rock that neer rifts asunder,The cry of her child, be it far or near.This is love wonderful beyond compare;It is Gods choicest gift to mortal man;You, who know Mother, in this thought must share,For, she, of all, is Angel of your Clan.My Mother is black, loveliest of all;Yes, she is as pure as the new made morn;Her song of glee is a clear rythmic callTo these arms of love to which I was born.I shall never forget you, sweet Mother,Whereer in life I may happen to roam;Thou shalt always be the Fairy CharmerTo turn my dearest thoughts to things at home.Written by Marcus Garvey (1887-1940)
  5. 5. Page 5 of 9Have Faith In SelfToday I made myself in life anew,By going to that royal fount of truth,And searching for the secret of the fewWhose goal in life and aim is joy forsooth.I found at last the friend and counsellorThat taught me all that I in life should know;It is the soul, the sovereign chancellor,The guide and keeper of the good you sow.I am advised-"Go ye, have faith in self,And seek once more the guide that lives in you"Much better than the world of sordid pelf,Alas! I found the counsel to be true.Aha! I know right now that I shall seeThe good in life, and be a better man;I will by thought and deed pull all to me,In saving others, yea, every one.Go down and search yourself awhile in part,And tell me all of what vou see and hear;Isnt there something pulling at your heart?Tell me the truth and have ye then no fear!There is a voice that speaks to man, within,It is the Soul that longs for you to knowThere is no need for you to grope in sin,For you in truth and light may ever grow.Written by Marcus Garvey (1887-1940)
  6. 6. Page 6 of 9The Rise Of The NegroTo rise and demonstrate en masseIs way to make the oppressor think,And so the Negro in his Class,Sends forth his message to the King.The King, a symbol of the State,Sends forth his men to find whats wrong,And back comes word of awful fateOn which the lives of men do hang.The State assumes its task at last,And makes an effort to amendThe wrongs that reigned throughout the pastBy giving heed, though laws defend.Written by Marcus Garvey (1887-1940)
  7. 7. Page 7 of 9Some BiographyBorn in St. Anns Bay, Jamaica, on August 17, 1887, MarcusGarvey was the youngest of 11 children. Garvey moved toKingston at the age of 14, found work in a printshop, and becameacquainted with the abysmal living conditions of the laboringclass. He quickly involved himself in social reform, participatingin the first Printers Union strike in Jamaica in 1907 and in settingup the newspaper The Watchman. Leaving the island to earnmoney to finance his projects, he visited Central and SouthAmerica, amassing evidence that black people everywhere werevictims of discrimination. He visited the Panama Canal Zone andsaw the conditions under which the West Indians lived andworked. He went to Ecuador, Nicaragua, Honduras, Colombia andVenezuala. Everywhere, blacks were experiencing greathardships.Garvey returned to Jamaica distressed at the situation in CentralAmerica, and appealed to Jamaicas colonial government to helpimprove the plight of West Indian workers in Central America.His appeal fell on deaf ears. Garvey also began to lay thegroundwork of the Universal Negro Improvement Association, towhich he was to devote his life. Undaunted by lack of enthusiasmfor his plans, Garvey left for England in 1912 in search ofadditional financial backing. While there, he met a Sudanese-Egyptian journalist, Duse Mohammed Ali. While working forAlis publication African Times and Oriental Review, Garveybegan to study the history of Africa, particularly, the exploitationof black peoples by colonial powers. He read Booker T.Washingtons Up From Slavery, which advocated black self-help.In 1914 Garvey organized the Universal Negro ImprovementAssociation and its coordinating body, the African CommunitiesLeague. In 1920 the organization held its first convention in NewYork. The convention opened with a parade down Harlems LenoxAvenue. That evening, before a crowd of 25,000, Garvey outlinedhis plan to build an African nation-state. In New York City hisideas attracted popular support, and thousands enrolled in theUNIA. He began publishing the newspaper The Negro World andtoured the United States preaching black nationalism to popularaudiences. His efforts were successful, and soon, the associationboasted over 1,100 branches in more than 40 countries. Most ofthese branches were located in the United States, which hadbecome the UNIAs base of operations. There were, however,offices in several Caribbean countries, Cuba having the most.
  8. 8. Page 8 of 9Branches also existed in places such as Panama, Costa Rica,Ecuador, Venezuela, Ghana, Sierra Leone, Liberia, Namibia andSouth Africa. He also launched some ambitious business ventures,notably the Black Star Shipping Line.In the years following the organizations first convention, theUNIA began to decline in popularity. With the Black Star Line inserious financial difficulties, Garvey promoted two new businessorganizations - the African Communities League and the NegroFactories Corporation. He also tried to salvage his colonizationscheme by sending a delegation to appeal to the League of Nationsfor transfer to the UNIA of the African colonies taken fromGermany during World War I.Financial betrayal by trusted aides and a host of legalentanglements (based on charges that he had used the U.S. mail todefraud prospective investors) eventually led to Garveysimprisonment in Atlanta Federal Penitentiary for a five-year term.In 1927 his half-served sentence was commuted, and he wasdeported to Jamaica by order of President Calvin Coolidge.Garvey then turned his energies to Jamaican politics, campaigningon a platform of self-government, minimum wage laws, and landand judicial reform. He was soundly defeated at the polls,however, because most of his followers did not have the necessaryvoting qualifications.In 1935 Garvey left for England where, in near obscurity, he diedon June 10, 1940, in a cottage in West Kensington.Source: http://www.afropoets.net/marcusgarvey.htmlFor additional Honorable Marcus Garveyresource see RBG Communiversity on SlideShare and /orRBG Blakademics on ScribdAudio/mp3 Downloads: RBG BHM 2012 Special EducationVideo: RBG BLAKADEMICS TV
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